Will your insurance pay for the damages in an at fault accident even if the driver of your car is uninsured in your policy?

The real answer is that you should talk to your insurance agent, because laws vary from location to location.

However, in most states, what's being insured is the car, not the driver. If you give permission to someone to drive your car and they get in an accident and it's their fault, usually your insurance company is going to be primarily liable for the damages. Your insurance company will probably pay (up to the limits of your coverage, at least), and raise your insurance rates.

Even if you didn't explicitly give permission, in most jurisdictions permission is assumed if the driver was a friend or family member. If you did not give them permission, you're probably going to be asked to throw them under the bus and testify that they stole your car.

One complicating factor is that while what's insured is the car, the rates are set partially based on the car (some cars cost more to fix, so will have higher comprehensive and uninsured motorist rates) and partly based on the drivers' records (higher collision rates). If there's a driver in your household with a poor driving record, you may get a cheaper rate by promising the insurance company "Oh, no, he's not going to drive this car, he's going to drive a different car insured by some other insurer, so you don't have to worry about his driving record."

If you live in a state that allows you to exclude drivers from your policy, and the driver was a person that you specifically excluded, your insurance company might be allowed to say "Hey, you said Crash Bandicoot here was not going to be driving your car, and lo and behold, he did drive your car, liar liar pants on fire, you pay for this, buddy." They may not be allowed to wriggle off the hook entirely, but they probably will at least be allowed to use drastically reduced coverage amounts, leaving a large bill for you to deal with. Crash's insurance (if he has any) may, or may not, kick in.
The real answer is that you should talk to your insurance agent, because laws vary from location to location.

However, in most states, what's being insured is the car, not the driver. If you give permission to someone to drive your car and they get in an accident and it's their fault, usually your insurance company is going to be primarily liable for the damages. Your insurance company will probably pay (up to the limits of your coverage, at least), and raise your insurance rates.

Even if you didn't explicitly give permission, in most jurisdictions permission is assumed if the driver was a friend or family member. If you did not give them permission, you're probably going to be asked to throw them under the bus and testify that they stole your car.

One complicating factor is that while what's insured is the car, the rates are set partially based on the car (some cars cost more to fix, so will have higher comprehensive and uninsured motorist rates) and partly based on the drivers' records (higher collision rates). If there's a driver in your household with a poor driving record, you may get a cheaper rate by promising the insurance company "Oh, no, he's not going to drive this car, he's going to drive a different car insured by some other insurer, so you don't have to worry about his driving record."

If you live in a state that allows you to exclude drivers from your policy, and the driver was a person that you specifically excluded, your insurance company might be allowed to say "Hey, you said Crash Bandicoot here was not going to be driving your car, and lo and behold, he did drive your car, liar liar pants on fire, you pay for this, buddy." They may not be allowed to wriggle off the hook entirely, but they probably will at least be allowed to use drastically reduced coverage amounts, leaving a large bill for you to deal with. Crash's insurance (if he has any) may, or may not, kick in.