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2007-05-12 22:56:35
2007-05-12 22:56:35

Does it have a power distribution box under hood? Check dimmer switch and wiring

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Related Questions


It is a relay or switch problem. A circuit breaker or fuse won't keep a light on.


If headlamps are not working but the parking lights are working can it be the fuse that is faulty


That's how 1964 1/2 thru 1967 Mustangs lights are designed to operate.. when the headlamps are turned on the amber parking lights are turned off. That was changed sometime in 1967-68 so that the amber parking lights remain on when the headlamps are on.. It is possible to install a later model (1968) type headlight switch and wiring if you really want the parking lights to remain on when the headlamps are on however. Electrical Wiring drawings are available (to purchase) for every year mustang from almost any mustang restoration shop/website.


A block heater does not use a fuse on the vehicle It is like a heating element on an electric kettle , it has a circuit breaker or fuse on the electrical supply panel in the building ( or if it is a plug in post in a parking lot , the breaker is inside the post )



If the headlights do not come on and the parking lights do in a 2000 Jeep Wrangler, it is possible that the fuse is blown for the headlamps. It is also possible for them to both be burned out due to touching the glass part when installing them. Oil in the fingers will overheat them and burn them out.


You probably have a faulty headlight switch. Replace it and that should fix it. Been there, done that.




See Headlamps, Front Parking and Turn Signal Lamps on page 6-36 of your "Owner's Manual", under Section 6: Service and Appearance Care - Bulb Replacement.....


See Headlamps, Front Parking and Turn Signal Lamps, under Section 6: Service and Appearance Care - Bulb Replacement, on page 6-36 of your "Owner's Manual"...


Same circuit/fuse as the parking/tail lights.


When your parking light stays on after you shut off the car, it is likely that the relay on that circuit stayed on. Disconnect the battery for 10 minutes or so and then reconnect it.


See Headlamps, Front Turn Signal, and Parking Lamps on page 5-53 of your "Owner's Manual", under Section 5: Service and Appearance Care - Bulb Replacement...


See Headlamps, Front Turn Signal, and Parking Lamps on page 5-53 of your "Owner's Manual", under Section 5: Service and Appearance Care - Bulb Replacement.....


See Headlamps, Front Turn Signal, Sidemarker, and Parking Lamps on page 5-48 of your "Owner's Manual, under Section 5: Service and Appearance Care - Bulb Replacement...


Should be the same circuit for parking/tail/dash lights


Should be parking/tail/dash lights on a common circuit


Check to see if the parking lights and tailights are working - if not may be a fuse (same circuit)


Check the fuse for parking/tailights (dash lights also on this circuit)


parking lights, these are usually tied to the same circuit as the instrument panel lights


Fuses That "Blow" RepeatedlyWithout being able to "hands on" troubleshoot the circuit served by the repeatedly blowing fuse, none of us can identify the specific defect which is causing your problem.Therefore, the following generic answer can be applied to any electrical circuit, whether in a vehicle, or in a building, or whether alternating current [AC] or direct current [DC].Fuses [and Circuit Breakers] are safety devices designed and installed in electrical circuits TO PROTECT the conductors [wires] and other components from short circuit conditions and/or overload conditions which cause an extremely large flow of electrical current [measured in Amperes], which causes overheating of the conductors that results in damage to the insulation and the conductors.And in a worst case scenario, the probability of a FIRE which could destroy the vehicle, house, or other structure in which the circuit is located.When a fuse or Circuit Breaker [and replacement fuses, or "tripping" Circuit Breakers] "blow," especially if it happens repeatedly, is an indication of an UNSAFE CONDITION in that circuit, usually a short.The fuse or circuit breaker is doing what it was designed, intended, and installed to do, protect the conductors and components of the circuit which it serves.The proper "fix" is for a qualified electrical technician, who knows what he or she is doing, to troubleshoot the involved circuit, find and identify the defect, and make proper repair [s], BEFORE replacing the fuse again [with the properly sized fuse or before resetting a circuit breaker].Some ignorant people will suggest installing a larger fuse or breaker to solve the problem, BUT that will only increase the hazard, not correct it.Do not follow "bad" advice by installing a larger fuse in a misguided attempt to correct the problem. To install an over-sized fuse would almost guarantee damage to the wiring and an electrical system fire


Fuses That "Blow" RepeatedlyWithout being able to "hands on" troubleshoot the circuit served by the repeatedly blowing fuse, none of us can identify the specific defect which is causing your problem.Therefore, the following generic answer can be applied to any electrical circuit, whether in a vehicle, or in a building, whether direct current [DC], or alternating current [AC].Fuses [and Circuit Breakers] are safety devices designed and installed in electrical circuits TO PROTECT the conductors [wires] and other components from short circuit conditions and/or overload conditions which cause an extremely large flow of electrical current [measured in Amperes], which causes overheating of the conductors that results in damage to the insulation and the conductors.And in a worst case scenario, the probability of a FIRE which could destroy the vehicle, house, or other structure in which the circuit is located.When a fuse or Circuit Breaker [and replacement fuses, or repeatedly "tripping" Circuit Breakers] "blow," especially if it happens repeatedly, is an indication of an UNSAFE CONDITION in that circuit, usually a short.The fuse or circuit breaker is doing what it was designed, intended, and installed to do; that is to protect the conductors and components of the circuit which it serves.The proper "fix" for this issue is for a qualified technician, who knows what he or she is doing, to troubleshoot the involved circuit, find and identify the defect, and make proper repair [s], BEFORE replacing the fuse again [with the properly sized fuse or before resetting a circuit breaker].Some ignorant few people will suggest installing a larger fuse or breaker to solve the problem, BUT that will only increase the hazard, not correct it.Do not follow "bad" advice by installing a larger fuse in a misguided attempt to correct the problem. To install an oversized fuse would almost guarantee damage to the wiring and the probability of an electrical system fire.


See Headlamps, Front Turn Signal, and Parking Lamps on page 5-55 of your "Owner's Manual", under Section 5: Service and Appearance Care - Bulb Replacement.....


Parking place is Place de Parking On street parking is Parking sur rue Parking underground is Parking souterrain Parking ticket is Billet de parking Parking meter is Parcometre



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