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The President nominates a candidate for the US Supreme Court; the Senate votes whether to confirm or reject the nomination. If the candidate is confirmed, he or she is appointed to the US Supreme Court.

Process

The preselected list of candidates is usually recommended by people in the President's political party or by members of legislation (House of Representatives, and Congress), usually it's a combination of both. The President nominates a potential justice.

After a candidate has been nominated, the FBI investigates the person's background and provides a report to the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Judiciary Committee conducts hearings (questioning) on the candidate. The hearing is meant to determine whether the candidate is qualified and suitable for the position.

After the Committee reviews the nominee, they pass a recommendation to reject or coor. The Senate then votes for or against the candidate. In order to become a Supreme Court Justice, the nominee must receive a simple majority (51 votes) of the Senate, unless a group chooses to filibuster, in which case a three-fifths (60) cloture vote is required to end the filibuster and complete the appointment.

It is highly unlikely that a candidate will be rejected. Since 1789, the Senate has rejected 30 out of the 144 nominees, the most recent being Robert Bork in 1987.

A Contributor's Tip

First, get into law: go to a good College or University, then to a specialized law school. All in all, a LOT of years in school. Then, you probably start out as an intern for a defense lawyer or crown council. You could join a defense firm later on. If you're really good, and once you have enough experience, you can become employed by the government as a provincial crown, then a supreme court crown. After 30+ or so years, you can apply for a judging job, then work your way up to supreme court Judge.

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12y ago
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12y ago

There is only one path to these positions. Every Supreme Court justice is nominated by the president. A sitting president usually has a list of potential nominees, but action isn't taken until there is an opening on the court. The nominee is approved or rejected by the Senate, and the process continues until a nominee is approved. Usually the Chief Justice is replaced by a newnominee to the court; there is no constitutional requirement that a sitting justice be nominated for the position of Chief Justice. But a president could make such a nomination. There would then be a vacancy to fill, starting with another presidential nomination. The president nominates for the vacant position of Chief Justice; he cannot single-handedly replace the Chief Justice.

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9y ago

The United States Constitution enumerates specific instructions as to the naming and confirmation of Supreme Court justices. These are the appointment by the president and confirmation by the Senate.

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9y ago

The language in Article II, Section 2 of the Constitution can be summarized as defining the appointment process as "nomination by the President, with Senate approval, demonstrated by a simple majority vote confirming the nomination."

Explanation

According to Cornell University Law School, "The Constitution appears to distinguish three stages in appointments by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The first is the "nomination" of the candidate by the President alone; the second is the assent of the Senate to the candidate's "appointment;" and the third is the final appointment and commissioning of the appointee, by the President."

Article II, Section 2, Paragraphs 2 and 3

Nomination Clause

"[The President] shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law: but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments.

"The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of their next session."

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6y ago

The President nominates a candidate for the US Supreme Court; the Senate votes whether to confirm or reject the nomination. If the candidate is confirmed, he or she is appointed to the US Supreme Court.

Process

The preselected list of candidates is usually recommended by people in the President's political party or by members of legislation (House of Representatives, and Congress), usually it's a combination of both. The President nominates a potential justice.

After a candidate has been nominated, the FBI investigates the person's background and provides a report to the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Judiciary Committee conducts hearings (questioning) on the candidate. The hearing is meant to determine whether the candidate is qualified and suitable for the position.

After the Committee reviews the nominee, they pass a recommendation to reject or confirm to the Senate floor. The Senate then votes for or against the candidate. In order to become a Supreme Court Justice, the nominee must receive a simple majority (51 votes) of the Senate, unless a group chooses to filibuster, in which case a three-fifths (60) cloture vote is required to end the filibuster and complete the appointment.

It is highly unlikely that a candidate will be rejected. Since 1789, the Senate has rejected 30 out of the 144 nominees, the most recent being Robert Bork in 1987.

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8y ago

The President nominates a person, the the Senate votes to confirm the nomination.

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12y ago

must be nominated by the president

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Q: How does someone become a US Supreme Court justice?
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Related questions

Are The president's power to appoint supreme court justices is checked by?

The President submits his choice to be a Supreme Court Justice for approval to the Congress. If the Congress does not vote for approval, (and there have been times when they voted against the President's choices), the person does not become a Supreme Court Justice and the President has to select someone else and have that person voted for by the Congress.


What native South Carolinian served as a justice on the US supreme court and then resigned that seat in order to become the Chief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court?

John Rutledge


What age requirement for the supreme court justice?

There are no explicit requirements in the U.S. Constitution for a person to be nominated to become a Supreme Court justice. No age, education, job experience, or citizenship rules exist. In fact, according to the Constitution, a Supreme Court justice does not need to even have a law degree.


What is an Associate Justice on the US Supreme Court?

Associate Justice is the formal title for any US Supreme Court justice who is not the Chief Justice. There are eight Associate Justices and one Chief Justice on the Supreme Court.


Can a person be a US Supreme Court justice and a Senator?

No, not at the same time. A US Supreme Court justice can serve in the Senate if he (or she) resigns from the Supreme Court, runs for office, and is elected. A US Senator can become a justice on the US Supreme Court if he (or she) resigns from the Senate (or has already resigned or been voted out of office) and is subsequently appointed by the President and approved by the Senate.


Who was the first president to become a supreme court justice?

The first (and so far only) US President to have also served as a Justice of the Supreme Court was William Howard Taft, who was appointed Chief Justice by Warren Harding.


What position did William Howard Taft hold after presidency?

He was Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1921-1930. He was nominated to the post by President Harding.He was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.


What were thurgood marshalls careers?

Thurgood Marshall's careers were an attorney and A Supreme Court Justice .


Who is the highest judge of the US Supreme Court?

The Chief Justice presides over the US Supreme Court. At present, the Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court is John G. Roberts, Jr.


How many years do you need to be a citizen to become a US Supreme Court justice?

While there is no specific citizenship requirement in the United States Constitution for a federal judge or Supreme Court Justice, Article VI of the Constitution does require judges and justices to be "bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution." Since it is highly unlikely that someone could be a foreign national and still swear to that oath or affirmation, it is highly unlikely that a non-citizen could become a Supreme Court Justice.


Does the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court lead the Court?

Yes. The Chief Justice leads or "presides over" the Supreme Court.


Which former president was chief of justice after presidentcy?

William Howard Taft went on to become the Supreme Court Chief Justice.