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The Bluest Eye was written by Toni Morrison.

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11y ago
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4mo ago

"The Bluest Eye" was written by Toni Morrison, a renowned American author and Nobel Laureate in Literature. The novel explores issues of racism, beauty standards, and self-worth through the story of a young Black girl named Pecola Breedlove.

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10y ago

It was published in America by the publishers Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

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13y ago

Toni Morrison wrote The Bluest Eye.

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Q: Who wrote the novel the bluest eye?
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Related questions

When was The Bluest Eye created?

The Bluest Eye was created in 1970.


How many chapters in im The Bluest Eye?

The novel "The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison consists of an introductory section followed by four parts, which are further divided into a total of eleven chapters.


What year was the book The Bluest Eye written?

Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye was published in 1970.


Analize the title of the bluest eye?

In a nutshell.... The novel is titled the Bluest Eye because of the predominate theme of the socialy comformed idea of beauty. The obsession that Pecola had with blue eyes in what eventually led to her insanity. Thus, Morrison titled the book the Bluest Eye to represent the theme of conformed beauty. In a nutshell.... The novel is titled the Bluest Eye because of the predominate theme of the socialy comformed idea of beauty. The obsession that Pecola had with blue eyes in what eventually led to her insanity. Thus, Morrison titled the book the Bluest Eye to represent the theme of conformed beauty.


How many pages does The Bluest Eye have?

Mr.AnonymousTheir is 430,000+ copies sold


In The Bluest Eye does pecola get blue eyes?

Yes, Pecola does not physically get blue eyes in Toni Morrison's novel "The Bluest Eye." Her desire for blue eyes stems from a belief that they will make her feel beautiful and accepted in a society that values whiteness. The novel explores themes of internalized racism, oppression, and the damaging effects of societal beauty standards.


What was Toni Morrisons first book?

Toni Morrison's first book was "The Bluest Eye," which was published in 1970. It is a powerful novel that explores themes of race, beauty, and identity.


What was the time setting 'Of the Bluest Eye'?

The time setting of "The Bluest Eye" is the early 1940s in Lorain, Ohio. The novel spans over a year, primarily focusing on the events that take place during one particularly difficult year in young Pecola Breedlove's life.


What are some internal conflicts of The Bluest Eye by Morrison?

Some internal conflicts in "The Bluest Eye" include Pecola's struggle with her sense of self-worth and identity due to societal beauty standards, her desire for blue eyes as a symbol of acceptance and validation, and the impact of trauma and abuse on her mental well-being. These conflicts highlight themes of race, beauty, and identity in the novel.


Is The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison an autobiography?

No, The Bluest Eye is not an autobiography. It is a work of fiction that explores themes of race, identity, and beauty through the story of a young Black girl growing up in 1940s Ohio.


WHAT ARE THEMES OF THE BLUEST EYE?

Some themes in "The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison include racism and its impact on self-worth, beauty standards and their harmful effects, the search for identity and belonging, and the destructive nature of internalized oppression.


What role does social class play in the novel The Bluest Eyes?

In "The Bluest Eye," social class plays a significant role in shaping characters' lives and influencing their perceptions of themselves and others. The characters' socioeconomic status impacts their access to opportunities, education, and resources, highlighting the inequalities and prejudices that exist based on class. Additionally, the novel explores how societal notions of beauty and self-worth are often tied to social class, reinforcing systemic discrimination and marginalization.