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In recent agronomy, tilling is not one of the best farming practices anymore.

Tilling involve digging about a spade deep, and putting the soil back in the ground, but inverting the top and bottom layers.

Both layers contain different sets of organisms, for instance aerobic bacteria that require oxygen in the top soil, and anaerobic bacteria in the bottom layer. You basically kill most of both kinds every time you till.

Tilling is a great mechanical way to get rid of weeds, as they will decompose when put upside down under the ground with no sunlight available, but it is currently viewed as bringing about a few flaws, among which:

  • Soil compaction: Tilling means heavy equipment will compact the soil in a job that is now viewed as unnecessary. Plant roots can't penetrate the bottom soil easily and it stresses the plants and reduce productivity.
  • Tillage pan: Because tilling always happen at the same depth, a watertight crust forms at the level separating the tilled soil from the still soil. This layer makes it harder for the plants to break through or for the nutrients to penetrate deep.
  • Erosion: A tilled soil is totally exposed to the action of rain without protection. Such naked soil is more likely to run off and erode.

More and more American farmers have adopted the "no-till" cultural practice, which consists in leaving the soil as it is after harvest, or maybe planting green manure, and planting the new crop directly in the soil that still has the stubbles of the old crop in it.

However, no-till relies heavily on genetically modified plants that produce their own pesticide in order to reduce the number of tractor passages.

The Fukuoka method of farming is an Organic Gardening method that does not use tillage, but it does not suit intensive organic farming.

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Lincoln Wolf

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11y ago

In recent agronomy, tilling is not one of the best farming practices anymore.

Tilling involve digging about a spade deep, and putting the soil back in the ground, but inverting the top and bottom layers.

Both layers contain different sets of organisms, for instance aerobic bacteria that require oxygen in the top soil, and anaerobic bacteria in the bottom layer. You basically kill most of both kinds every time you till.

Tilling is a great mechanical way to get rid of weeds, as they will decompose when put upside down under the ground with no sunlight available, but it is currently viewed as bringing about a few flaws, among which:

  • Soil compaction: Tilling means heavy equipment will compact the soil in a job that is now viewed as unnecessary. Plant roots can't penetrate the bottom soil easily and it stresses the plants and reduce productivity.
  • Tillage pan: Because tilling always happen at the same depth, a watertight crust forms at the level separating the tilled soil from the still soil. This layer makes it harder for the plants to break through or for the nutrients to penetrate deep.
  • Erosion: A tilled soil is totally exposed to the action of rain without protection. Such naked soil is more likely to run off and erode.

More and more American farmers have adopted the "no-till" cultural practice, which consists in leaving the soil as it is after harvest, or maybe planting green manure, and planting the new crop directly in the soil that still has the stubbles of the old crop in it.

However, no-till relies heavily on genetically modified plants that produce their own pesticide in order to reduce the number of tractor passages.

The Fukuoka method of farming is an Organic Gardening method that does not use tillage, but it does not suit intensive organic farming.

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Q: What is important of tilling in soil?
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Related questions

How is the tilling of soil useful for the crops growing in it?

how is tilling of soil useful for the crops to grow in it


What do you mean by tilling the soil?

Turning the soil over


What does tilling the soil mean?

Tilling the soil is the same cultivating it/ digging it up.


Why is it important to aerate?

Aeration improves movement of water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide through your soil which is important for not only plant roots, but also for microbes and other soil biota that also help move nutrients around for your plants. But, don't aerate too much with tilling. Tilling increases soil erosion and aslo nutrient leaching.


Does tilling reduce soil erosion?

drip irrigation


What is the art of tilling the soil called?

tillage


What is tilling?

Unsorted rock material deposisited directly by moving glaicers


What is the negative effect of tilling include?

increased soil erosion


The negative effects of tilling include .?

increased soil erosion


What is a one word substitute for the art of tilling soil?

cultivation


Soil erosion can be increased by?

Soil erosion can be increased by wind, water, or over tilling the land.


What are the different methods of soil preparation?

ploughing tilling levelling tillage