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Community colleges are way cheaper to attend than university. Instructors there are able to be more helpful than those in university (because they don’t have textbooks or research that they’re busy working on). Anyone is admitted, unlike university when you have to be accepted in. You also don’t have to take the SATs because you’d go to university as a transfer student. If you don’t know what you want to major in, you can take extra time in the community college trying to figure it out (which is much better than attending a university and figuring out that you may not like the field you decided to major in). The time spent in community college translates into two years of university. Many people stereotype community college as a place where dumb/unsuccessful high school dropouts and graduates attend after they’ve been rejected from universities. Which is only partially true. Community college is for anyone, no matter what their reasons are.

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16y ago
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13y ago

Community colleges do not have an application process like universities do. They are not selective because, as their name might suggest, they are there to educate the community, which is also why they are much cheaper than universities. It may also have to do with the fact that community colleges do not receive as much funding as universities, so they need more students to enroll so they can meet their revenue minimums.

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15y ago

Associates (Community College Level) vs. Bachelors (Four Year College or University)

Community College Level

An Associate degree (two year community college) is designed as a two year program of study as a full-time student provided the student takes the degree as prescribed by the college. Evidently it would take longer as a part-time student. Within the United States, the associates typically falls into three main categories; Associates of Arts (AA), Associates of Science (AS), and Associates of Applied Science (AAS). An associates of arts (AA), and associates in science (AS) degrees are typically designed for transfer to a four year college or university. Therefore, these degrees have a strong liberal arts emphasis and include a good balance of humanities, social science, and written communication along with the exact sciences especially in higher level math. They also have the foundational course work needed as prerequisites for the higher level courses at the four year institution. The AAS was typically designed as a terminal degree giving the student all the expertise needed to enter the workforce after completion of the degree. However, today, many AAS degree are transferable to four year institutions, but the student should meet with the transfer counselor for appropriate direction when it comes to the AAS degrees. Depending on the program of study and state mandates, the associates can take anywhere from 60 to 64 credits to complete. Some programs of study (usually within the health related fields) may take a bit more in credits.

Four Year College or University Level

The Bachelor's degree (four year college or university)is designed as a four year program of study provided the student takes the degree as prescribed by the college or university. Again, part-time students will take longer to complete the degree. How long it would take depends on the credit load taken per semester. Basically, within the United States there are two common categories; Bachelors of Arts (BA), and Bachelors of Science (BS). It depends on the institution and department within the school as to which focus they prefer.

The BA has a broader scope, with a strong emphasis on the humanities, theoretical and general knowledge in a recognized discipline, interdisciplinary field, or of a professional study.

The BS is more of a focused approach with a science base to include a balance of liberal arts, technological knowledge, math and computer oriented skills, and practical skills needed for a particular discipline within the field.

The number of credits required depends on the program of study. In general, the bachelors can take between 120 and 128 credits to complete. Some programs of study may take more. For example, architecture. The following are some differences between community colleges, and four year colleges and universities.

Community College

Many individuals start at the community college level for a variety of reasons to include:

  • Community colleges are less expensive to start out with. You can cut the cost of a four year degree almost in half by starting at a community college first, and then transferring to four year college or university to finish up the last two years.
  • There are typically smaller classroom sizes at the community college with a better professor to student ratio, which means more individualized attention.
  • Some students do not meet the entrance requirements of the four year college or university, thus they start at the community college first, then transfer later.
  • The community colleges are typically more family oriented, with a strong sense of community.
  • Some students like to be close to home, thus they start at their home county community college.

Four Year Colleges and Universities

  • Four year institutions are usually larger, with a number of activities not offered at the community college level. For example, fraternities, and sororities, College Football, etc.
  • Some colleges may have top name lecturers, within large lecture halls which are preferred by many students.
  • Some individuals like the four year institutions environment (the university atmosphere).
  • There are students who can major in special program curriculums not offered by the community college.

In the end, it is a matter of preference. Do you like being a big fish in a little pond, or a little fish in a big pond? Whichever you choose, you must be happy with your school, its offerings, the services provided, and environment. If you're not happy, you will not fair as well.

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15y ago

Many individuals start at the community college level for a variety of reasons to include: * Community colleges are less expensive to start out with. You can cut the cost of a four year degree almost in half by starting at a community college first, and then transferring to four year college or university to finish up the last two years. * There are typically smaller classroom sizes at the community college with a better professor to student ratio, which means more individualized attention. * Some students do not meet the entrance requirements of the four year college or university, thus they start at the community college first, then transfer later. * The community colleges are typically more family oriented, with a strong sense of community. * Some students like to be close to home, thus they start at their home county community college.

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14y ago

The advantages of community college is that they usually cost less and are close to home. Also, they are good for those whom are already in the workforce and looking to further thier education.

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Q: Why are more students enrolling in community colleges?
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What are the best schools on the east coast that accept students with mediocre grades?

Community colleges are not only more affordable but provide an excellent education even for those with mediocre grades. These colleges are more readily accepting of their applicants.


Community Colleges Can Be A Good Option?

The impact of the recession is causing more people to look for ways to cut cost. Some parents that have children graduating from high school are having difficulty paying for a college education. Private and public colleges and universities can be extremely expensive. For example, one year can cost from $20,000 to $70,000 per year. More families are considering the advantages of enrolling in community colleges. Community colleges have been looked at by some as an inferior way to get a higher education. But often students that start out in community colleges are more successful than those that do not. The smaller class size encourages instructors and students to become more acquainted. This results in a closer relationship during the classes. As a result, many students excel in these courses. The one on one training can make a huge difference in the life of a struggling student. In addition, the transition from high school to college can be overwhelming. Starting out in community colleges gives the student a chance to adjust to their new found freedom. Additionally, community colleges are less expensive than traditional public and private universities and colleges. A student and their family can save as much as $10,000 to $50,000 by attending community colleges. Many students are discovering that they can take their foundational classes at this school, and they can transfer when it is time to pursue a major. This method is highly cost effective, and it makes a great deal of sense. In conclusion, new ways of thinking are causing many people to reevaluate higher education options. It is great to attend an ivy league or traditional university; however, the budget of many is unable to afford this. Students do not have to completely lose out on a higher education because of finances. It is very possible to get a good quality education at a more affordable cost. Students that are considering racking up massive student loans may want to rethink this. Getting educated at community colleges is a way to avoid massive debt. This will be very important in their financial life. Many students express regret over the looming student loans. The difficult economy makes it worse on these students. Some are unable to find jobs and pay on their college student loans.


What groups are more important to college students and why?

In Colleges


How to Enroll In Community Colleges As a Senior?

Generally, adult seniors over the age of sixty-five, will enroll in their local Community Colleges. The college is much less expensive than a 4-year college, and they are much smaller in size. Usually, Community Colleges will allow seniors, over the age of sixty-five, to take college courses at no charge, but the courses do not get graded or used to earn a degree. Enrolling is easy and usually takes only a few steps. It is imperative that potential students call ahead to make an appointment with a Guidance Counselor. This is all that it takes to get the information needed. It also makes enrolling easy, pleasant and fast. At the same time, get all of your questions answered regarding your chosen major. if you decide to go for a degree, this is the time to find out more about the courses required. 1. Write a request for copies of all of your school records from the High School. Email them for a faster response. Be certain that all of your attending dates are correct or the school will not be able to locate your past records. 2. If you had taken college courses in your younger years, use the same procedure as above. Generally, many of the Community Colleges will accept specific subject grades that were given from other colleges. This holds true regardless of how many years it has been since you had last attended. Once the records arrive at the Community Colleges, the registrar will figure out how many credits can be used towards your earning a degree. 3. Decide whether you want to attend the college for a degree or if you merely want to attend classes. A registration procedure for each is entirely different. In fact, one is free, and the other charges a fee for each credit earned. 4. Arrange a meeting with the Community College Guidance Counselor. Discuss the reasons you want to enroll. Mention the classes that you are interested in taking that will lead to the college degree. Community Colleges offer a vast variety of classes, and charge different fees. Students who are interested in the theater can take acting classes. Those who are artistic can take painting or ceramic classes. There are also typing courses for students who are interested in a career in computers. Enrolling in Community Colleges is extremely easy and their fees are less than any 4-year colleges. These courses are required for students who wish to further their studies at a University.


How to Get a Good Education At Community Colleges?

If you compare tuition rates of community colleges to universities, community colleges will win hands down. However, the education you receive at community colleges may not stack up to the education you receive from their competitors. So, how can you ensure that you get a good education while still attending community college? • If you plan on attending a four-year university after community college, than you should call that university and inquire which community colleges they accept the majority of their students from. If there is a community college close to your house, but the university you want to attend doesn’t really accept a lot of their students, then it is worth driving a little bit further to the community college they do accept from. • Community colleges offer honors programs just like universities do. So, inquire about those classes, and enroll in any honor class that you are qualified for. Honors classes at a community college can prepare you for what it would be like to take higher level classes at a university. • Know your math and English materials. Many community colleges, like universities, require their new students to take math and English placement exams. If you do not score well on those exams, you will be required to take lower level courses which do not apply toward your anticipated degree. This can hold you back from transferring to a university for up to a year in some cases. • Get ready to hit the books. Just because you are in community college does not mean you can slack off. Universities look at your community college grades, just as they did your high school grades, when deciding if you meet their requirements. Consequently, universities look more positively on those transfer students who earned good grades in their freshman and sophomore years at community colleges. So, while community colleges may not stack up to a university in every way possible, there are some great opportunities that are available to students who attend community colleges. Take advantage of them and you will be successful when it comes time to transfer to a university.


What colleges do not accept homeschooled children?

None. All colleges accept homeschooled students, and a large number actively attempt to recruit more homeschooled students.


Who can tell me the best colleges about in Los Angeles?

LACCD are the largest community college district in the United States serving more than 250,000 students annually at nine colleges, spread throughout 36 cities in the greater Los Angeles area.


What are Colleges located in largely isolated areas with small populations are called?

Colleges located in largely isolated areas with small populations are typically referred to as rural colleges or rural campuses. These schools often cater to students who prefer a quieter and more close-knit community environment.


are Tennessee schools good or bad lately?

Schools in Tennessee lately have been holding their ground. Many students are graduating and more and more students are enrolling because of the new classes being offered.


How many students who are accepted into college are there on a scholarship?

their is more that 2 million students accented in colleges in the world


Do community colleges offer any courses in advanced career training?

Many community colleges do offer advanced career training. Contact your local community college for class schedules. Many community colleges do offer advanced carrer training. Contact your CC for more information on how to get this training.


What types of people attend community colleges?

Many individuals start at the community college level for a variety of reasons to include:Community colleges are less expensive to start out with. You can cut the cost of a four year degree almost in half by starting at a community college first, and then transferring to four year college or university to finish up the last two years.There are typically smaller classroom sizes at the community college with a better professor to student ratio, which means more individualized attention.Some students do not meet the entrance requirements of the four year college or university, thus they start at the community college first, then transfer later.The community colleges are typically more family oriented, with a strong sense of community.Some students like to be close to home, thus they start at their home county community college.Some careers only require an associates degree.