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Not really, it would be much better to say "You went to America in 1998" because the presence of the date means it was a specific event in the past. I have gone, or you have gone, implies that you went to stay with no intention of returning.

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โˆ™ 2008-08-18 02:26:50
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Q: You have gone to America in 1998 Is this grammatically correct?
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