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Testicular self-examination

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Because testicular cancer is a significant killer of teenage boys and grown men, doctors recommend monthly self-examination.

Men from puberty onwards should examine their testes after a hot shower or bath, when the scrotum is looser. They should first examine each testicle separately, feeling for lumps, and then compare them to see whether one is larger than the other. By doing this each month, males will become familiar with what is normal for them.

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14y ago
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13y ago

Regularly feel your testicles. They should be smooth all the way around. If you notice a bump that is attached to one that wasn't there the last time you checked, have it looked at.

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13y ago

If cancer is suspected, the doctor will order an Ultrasound.

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12y ago

Palpation with the fingers. Also, an Ultrasound is used.

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10y ago

A man should check for testicular cancer once a year. Testicular cancer is most common among males between the age of 15 to 35 so they should check annually for abnormalities.

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Q: How often should a man check for testicular cancer?
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Related questions

Why is it important for a male to examine his testes regularly how often should it be done?

It is important to check for testicular cancer. Once a month or so is sufficient to feel for unusual lumps.


How often should testicular exam be done?

a testicular exam should be done once a month


Why do your testicles hurt at night?

Testicular cancer Testicular cancer is cancer that develops in the testicles, a part of the male reproductive system. Epididymitis Inflammation of the epididymis. Testicular torsion In testicular torsion the spermatic cord that provides the blood supply to a testicle is twisted, cutting off the blood supply, often causing orchialgia. prolonged testicular torsion will result in the death of the testicle and surrounding tissues. Mumps A contagious and infectious viral disease causing swelling of the parotid salivary glands in the face, and a risk of sterility in adult males Hydrocele The accumulation of serous fluid in a body sac technically, it depends on what type of pain it is and you should see a doctor


What are the three main age groups having the highest frequency of testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer occurs most often in males in one of three age groups: boys 10 years old or younger; adult males between the ages of 20 and 40; and men over 60.


Where does testicular cancer originate from?

The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. There is no link between vasectomy and testicular cancer. Factors that may increase a man's risk for testicular cancer include:Abnormal testicle developmentHistory of testicular cancerHistory of undescended testicle(s)Klinefelter syndromeOther possible causes include exposure to certain chemicals and HIV infection. A family history of testicular cancer may also increase risk.Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men between the ages of 15 and 35. It can occur in older men, and rarely, in younger boys.White men are more likely than African-American and Asian-American men to develop this type of cancer.There are two main types of testicular cancer: seminomas and nonseminomas. These cancers grow from germ cells, the cells that make sperm.Seminoma: This is a slow-growing form of testicular cancer usually found in men in their 30s and 40s. The cancer is usually just in the testes, but it can spread to the lymph nodes. Seminomas are very sensitive to radiation therapy.Nonseminoma: This more common type of testicular cancer tends to grow more quickly than seminomas. Nonseminoma tumors are often made up of more than one type of cell, and are identified according to these different cell types:Choriocarcinoma (rare)Embryonal carcinomaTeratomaYolk sac tumorA stromal tumor is a rare type of testicular tumor. They are usually not cancerous. The two main types of stromal tumors are Leydig cell tumors and Sertoli cell tumors. Stromal tumors usually occur during childhood.


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Why would you get cancer of the pancreas?

Check the link below. It appears that it is often related to gene mutations.


Testicular cancer?

DefinitionTesticular cancer is cancer that starts in the testicles, the male reproductive glands located in the scrotum.Alternative NamesCancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancerCauses, incidence, and risk factorsThe exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. There is no link between vasectomy and testicular cancer. Factors that may increase a man's risk for testicular cancer include:Abnormal testicle developmentHistory of testicular cancerHistory of undescended testicleKlinefelter syndromeOther possible causes include exposure to certain chemicals and HIV infection. A family history of testicular cancer may also increase risk.Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men between the ages of 15 and 35. It can occur in older men, and rarely, in younger boys.White men are more likely than African-American and Asian-American men to develop this type of cancer.There are two main types of testicular cancer: seminomas and nonseminomas. These cancers grow from germ cells, the cells that make sperm.Seminoma: This is a slow-growing form of testicular cancer usually found in men in their 30s and 40s. The cancer is usually just in the testes, but it can spread to the lymph nodes. Seminomas are very sensitive to radiation therapy.Nonseminoma: This more common type of testicular cancer tends to grow more quickly than seminomas. Nonseminoma tumors are often made up of more than one type of cell, and are identified according to these different cell types:Choriocarcinoma (rare)Embryonal carcinomaTeratomaYolk sac tumorA stromal tumor is a rare type of testicular tumor. They are usually not cancerous. The two main types of stromal tumors are Leydig cell tumorsand Sertoli cell tumors. Stromal tumors usually occur during childhood.SymptomsThere may be no symptoms. Symptoms that may occur can include:Discomfort or pain in the testicle, or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotumDull ache in the back or lower abdomenEnlargement of a testicle or a change in the way it feelsExcess development of breast tissue (gynecomastia), however, this can occur normally in adolescent boys who do not have testicular cancerLump or swelling in either testicleSymptoms in other parts of the body, such as the lungs, abdomen, pelvis, back, or brain, may also occur if the cancer has spread.Signs and testsA physical examination typically reveals a firm lump (mass) in one of the testicles. When the health care provider holds a flashlight up to the scrotum, the light does not pass through the lump.Other tests include:Abdominal and pelvic CT scanBlood tests for tumor markers: alpha fetoprotein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta HCG), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH)Chest x-rayUltrasound of the scrotumA biopsy of the tissue is usually done after the entire testicle is surgically removed.TreatmentTreatment depends on the:Type of testicular tumorStage of the tumorOnce cancer is found, the first step is to determine the type of cancer cell by examining it under a microscope. The cells can be seminoma, nonseminoma, or both.The next step is to determine how far the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. This is called "staging."Stage I cancer has not spread beyond the testicle.Stage II cancer has spread to lymph nodes in the abdomen.Stage III cancer has spread beyond the lymph nodes (it could be as far as the liver, lungs, or brain).Three types of treatment can be used.Surgical treatment removes the testicle (orchiectomy) and nearby lymph nodes (lymphadenectomy). This is usually performed in the case of both seminoma and nonseminomas.Radiation therapy using high-dose x-rays or other high-energy rays may be used after surgery to prevent the tumor from returning. Radiation therapy is usually only used for treating seminomas.Chemotherapy uses drugs such as cisplatin, bleomycin, and etoposide to kill cancer cells. This treatment has greatly improved survival for patients with both seminomas and nonseminomas.Support GroupsJoining a support group where members share common experiences and problems can often help the stress of illness. Your local branch of the American Cancer Society may have a support group. See: www.cancer.org for more information.Lance Armstrong, a famous cyclist, is a survivor of testicular cancer. His web site -- www.laf.org -- offers support and information for patients with testicular cancer.The National Cancer Institute website also provides further information: www.cancer.govExpectations (prognosis)Testicular cancer is one of the most treatable and curable cancers.The survival rate for men with early-stage seminoma (the least aggressive type of testicular cancer) is greater than 95%. The disease-free survival rate for Stage II and III cancers is slightly lower, depending on the size of the tumor and when treatment is begun.ComplicationsTesticular cancer may spread to other parts of the body. The most common sites include the:AbdomenLungsRetroperitoneal area (the area near the kidneys)SpineComplications of surgery can include:Bleeding and infection after surgeryInfertility (if both testicles are removed)If you are of childbearing age, ask your doctor about methods to save your sperm for use at a later date.Calling your health care providerCall your health care provider if you have symptoms of testicular cancer.PreventionThe United States Preventive Services Tast Force recommends against routine screening for testicular cancer because there is no known effective screening technique.A testicular self-examination (TSE) performed on a monthly basis, however, may help detect such cancer at an early stage before it spreads. Finding it early is important to successful treatment and survival. Young men are sometimes taught how to perform self-exams shortly after puberty.ReferencesEinhorn LH. Testicular cancer. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 210.National Cancer Institute. Testicular cancer treatment PDQ. Updated Jan. 15, 2009.Richie JP, Steele GS. Neoplasms of the testis. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 29.Screening for testicular cancer: update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2004. Accessed March 29, 2009.


How often should a male testicular and female breast exam be preformed?

Digital rectal examination is done yearly for males 50 and above. Self breast exam monthly for women.Mammograms as early as 35 years old if there is familial history of cancer. 39 years old and above annul mammograms for those not at risk.


What should you check if your quad is stalling often?

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What are the Symptoms of testicular cancer?

The most common symptom of testicular cancer is a lump, or swelling, in one of your testicles. Testicular lumps are most commonly found on either the front, or the side, of the testicle. They often feel like a hard, pea-sized swelling. Testicular cancer can also cause other symptoms, including: * a dull ache, or sharp pain, in your testicles, or scrotum, which may come and go, * a feeling of heaviness in your scrotum, * a dull ache in your lower abdomen, * a sudden collection of fluid in your scrotum (hydrocele), * fatigue, and * generally feeling unwell.Common symptoms of testicular cancer are:lump in the testicle about the size of a peatesticle is painful to the touchpain in the lower abdomen or lower backblood in the urine


How often should someone get breast cancer checks?

You should get screened for breast cancer at least once every one to two years. The breast cancer screen is usually conducted by your family physician.