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It is known as the fastest growing tree in the world, albizia falcata can grow to 10 meters in 2 years and 30 meters in 10 years. Albizzia falcata is a favorite specie for plantations in Indonesia.

It is very easy to kiln dry, with consistent shrinkage during drying. Once dried, it is virtually termites free. After kiln dry, the weight can be as little as 0.25, therefore as core materials, albizia falcata is very famous for it's lightweight, strength and stableness. Because of this it is very popular in the timber industry. Used primarily in plywood and furniture. It is considered a Softwood.

It is also considered a weed in some parts of the word because its fast growth can quickly overrun other plant species in an ecological niche.

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โˆ™ 2013-05-16 12:49:20
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Q: What is an albizia falcata?
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What is the is botanical name for mimosa?

The Mimosa Tree is Albizia julibrissin (Persian silk tree, pink silk tree).


List of Philippine trees with their scientific names?

Many different trees are found in the Philippines. They include: Acacia Abuhin (Acacia holosericea) Achuete (Bixa orellana) Adelfa (Nerium oleander) African Tulip (Spathodea campanulata) Alcaparras (Capparis spinosa) Alibangbang (Bauhinia malabarica) Amapola (Hibiscus mutabilis) Amherstia (Amherstia nobilis) Anang-Baluga (Diospyros malayana) Antsoan-Dilau (Senna spectabilis) Aroma (Acacia farnesiana) Asiatic Sau/Silktree (Albizia julibrissin) Atemoya (Annona atemoya) Ates (Annona squamosa) Australian Anahau (Livistona australis) Avocado (Persea americana) Balatbat-Bilog (Licuala grandis) Balimbing (Averrhoa carambola) Bambu Hitam (Gigantochloa atroviolacea) Bayabas (Psidium guajava) Bayabas-Kitid (Psidium cujavillus) Big-Leafed Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) Black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) Bo Tree (Ficus religiosa) Brandis Bamboo (Dendrocalamus brandisii) Brazilian Firetree (Schizolobium parahybum) Breadfruit - see rimas Brownea (Brownea grandiceps) Brown Salwood (Acacia aulacocarpa) Buddha Bamboo (Bambusa tuldoides) Burma Kanomoi (Diospyros ehretioides) Burmann Cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanni) Butong (Dendrocalamus asper) Caballero (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) Calabash (Crescentia cujete) Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora) Canalete (Cordia gerascanthus) Cana-Fistula (Cassia fistula) Champaca (Michelia champaca) Cherimoya (Annona cherimolia) Chico/Sapodilla (Manilkara zapota) Chinese Anahau (Livistona chinensis) Chinese Bamboo (Bambusa dolichoclada) Chinese Rosewood (Dalbergia cochinchinensis) Chittagong Balok (Milletia atropurpurea) Consuelda (Euphorbia tirucalli) Cutchtree (Acacia catechu) Dapdap-Palong (Erythrina crista-galli) Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) Divi-Divi (Caesalpinia coriaria) Dudoang-Bulate (Hydnocarpus anthelminthicus) Earpod (Enterolobium cyclocarpum) Earpod Wattle/Auri (Acacia auriculiformis) Fiddled Fig (Ficus pandurata) Fireball (Calliandra haematocephala) Firetree (Delonix regia) Fishrod Bamboo (Phyllostachys aurea) Floranjilla (Solanum wrightii) Fringon (Bauhinia monandra) Fringon-Morado (Bauhinia purpurea) Gamboge-Tree (Garcinia morella) Gatasan-Layugan (Garcinia polyantha) Giant Bamboo (Dendrocalamus giganteus) Giant Ipil-Ipil (Leucaena pulverulenta) Granada (Punica granatum) Graygum (Eucalyptus tereticornis) Greenwattle (Acacia decurrens) Guama (Inga laurina) Gumamela (Hibiscus rosasinensis) Gumamela De Arana (Hibiscus schizopetalus) Guyabano (Annona muricata) Handapara (Dillenia indica) Hogplum (Spondias mombin) Hojacruz (Crescentia alata) Holarrhena (Hoarrhena antidysenterica) Honshu-Chiku (Bambusa multiplex) Huampit (Clausena lansium) Hybrid-Quinine (Cinchona hybrida) India Bamboo (Bambusa bambos) India Lanutan (Polyalthia longifolia) India Rosewood (Dalbergia latifolia) India Rubber (Ficus elastica) Ipil-Ipil (Leucaena leucocephala) Italian Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) Jacaranda (Jacaranda mimosifolia) Jackfruit - see nangka Japanese Alder (Alnus maritima) Japanese Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) Jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril) Java Almon (Canarium Indicum) Java Tanglin (Adenanthera microsperma) Kabiki (Mimusops elengi) Kahel (Citrus aurantium) Kalachuche (Plumeria acuminata) Kalachucheng-Pula (Plumeria rubra) Kalachucheng-Puti (Plumeria alba) Kalamunding (Citrus Microcarpa) Kamachile (Pithecellobium dulce) Kamansi - see rimas Kamias (Averrhoa bilimbi) Kanela (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) Kasui/Cashew (Anacardium occidentale) Katurai (Sesbania grandiflora) Kauayan-Kiling (Bambusa vulgaris) Kauayan-Tinik (Bambusa blumeana) Kauayan-Tsina (Bambusa multiplex) Kayali (Gigantochloa atter) Kayam (Inocarpus fagifer) Kuhl Abiki (Pinanga kuhlii) Kusibeng (Sapindus saponarea) Langil (Albizia lebbek) Lemon-Scented Gum (Eucalyptus maculata) Limon-Cito (Triphasia trifolia) Logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum) Loleba (Bambusa atra) Loudon Banaba (Lagerstroemia loudoni) Lukban (Citrus grandis) Lumbang (Aleurites moluccana) Machiku (Dendrocalamus latiflorus) Madagascar Pandan (Pandanus utilis) Madagascar Plum (Flacourtia jangomas) Madake (Phyllostachys bambusoides) Madre-Cacao (Gliricida sepium) Mahogany (Swietenia mahogani) Makopa (Syzygium samarangense) Malabar Narra (Pterocarpus marsupium) Malakaturai (Senna multijuga) Malapascuas (Euphorbia cotinifolia) Malarayap-Intsik (Atalantia citrioides) Malatanglin (Adenanthera pavonina) Malayan-Abiki (Pinanga malaiana) Malayan Myrtle (Lagerstroemia floribunda) Maluko (Pisonia grandis) Mamon (Annona glabra) Mangium (Acacia mangium) Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) Manzanitas (Ziziphus mauritiana) Marcgrav Sweetsop (Annona marcgravii) Melina (Gmelina arborea) Melindres (Lagerstroemia indica) Mexican Gumtree (Cochlospermum regium) Mezquite (Prosopis juliflora) Moluccan Sau (Paraserianthes falcataria) Money Jak (Artocarpus rigidus) Mottled-Leaf Dapdap (Erythrina variegata) Mulberry (Morus macroura) Nam-Nam (Cynometra cauliflora) Nangka/Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) Naranjita (Citrus nobilis) Narrow-Leafed Saraca (Saraca taipengensis) Neem (Azadirachta indica) Niog (Cocos nucifera) Oldham Bamboo (Bambusa oldhamii) Oliva (Cycas revoluta) Palo-Santo (Triplaris cumingiana) Panama Rubber (Castilla elastica) Paper Mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera) Papuang-Gilai (Polycias ornata) Papuang-Laparan (Polycias guilfoylei) Para Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) Pascuas (Euphorbia pulcherrima) Perpon-Pula (Acalypha wilkesiana) Persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) Peruvian-Bell (Thevetia peruviana) Peruvian Parasol (Cavanillesia hylogeiton) Pigeon-Berry (Duranta erecta) Pinkball (Calliandra portoricensis) Pinkshower (Cassia javanica) Pointed Star-Apple (Chrysophyllum oliviforme) Polynesian Ivory-Palm (Coelococcus amicarum) Portugese Cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) Pukinggang-Kahoi (Clitoria racemosa) Purple-Red Fireball (Calliandra calothyrsus) Quassia (Quassia amara) Quinine (Cinchona calisaya) Raintree/Acacia (Samanea saman) Red-Bark Quinine (Cinchona succirubra) Rimas/Kamansi/Breadfruit (Artocarpus communis) River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) Sampaloc (Tamarindus indica) Sandalwood (Santalum album) San Francisco (Codiaeum variegatum) Saraca (Saraca declinata) Sawai (Manilkara kauki) Sibukau (Caesalpinia sappan) Sineguelas (Spondias purpurea) Solid Bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus) Southern Mahogany (Eucalyptus botryoides) Spanish Cedar (Cedrela odorata) Spineless India Bamboo (Bambusa tulda) Spiny American Bamboo (Guadua angustifolia) Spotted Iron Gum (Eucalyptus maculata) Star-Apple (Chrysophyllum cainito) Stemmed Durian (Durio testudinarum) Strychnine-Tree (Strychnos nux-vomica) Surinam Cherry (Eugenia uniflora) Swamp-Mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta) Taiwan Bamboo (Bambusa dolichomerithalla) Taiwan Useful Bamboo (Bambusa utilis) Talipot Palm (Corypha umbraculifera) Tambis (Syzygium aqueum) Tampui (Syzygium jambos) Tangalo (Actinorhytis calapparia) Tasmanian Bluegum (Eucalyptus globulus) Teak (Tectona grandis) Thailand Bamboo (Thyrsostachys siamensis) Thailand Gamboge-Tree (Garcinia hanburyi) Thailand Shower (Senna siamea) Tiger/Spotted Bamboo (Bambusa maculata) Toyokan (Cleidion megistrophyllum) Traveler's/Traveller's Tree (Ravenala madagascariensis) True Star-Anise (Illicium verum) Trumpet Tree (Cecropia peltata) Tsa (Camellia sinensis) Tsampakang-Puti (Michelia x alba) Tsempedak (Artocarpus interger) Tsiampaka (Elmerillia tsiampacca) Tuba (Croton tiglium) Viapple (Spondias cytherea) Waya (Dendrocalamus membranaceus) Yambu (Syzygium malaccense) Yellow-Bark Quinine (Cinchona ledgeriana) Yellow-Brunsfelsia (Brunsfelsia americana) Yellow-Elder (Tecoma stans) Yellow Shower (Senna fruticosa) Zapote (Diospyros digyna) Zigzag-Rosewood (Dalbergia sissoo)


What is the scientific name of rain tree?

InTrODUCTIOn Rain tree (Samanea saman) is easily recognized by its char- acteristic umbrella-shaped canopy. When grown in the open, the tree usually reaches 15-25 m (50-80 ft) in height with a canopy diameter wider than the tree is tall. Rain tree is most important in the Pacific as a shade tree on small farms, along roads, in parks and pastures. The wood has limited use for carved bowls in local markets; it could be developed more widely as a commercial timber, comparing favorably to black walnut. A multitude of minor uses is documented for rain tree, most of them of purely local sig- nificance, but all could be explored for wider applicability. Rain tree naturalizes freely almost everywhere it has been introduced and is considered an invasive pest in Vanuatu and Fiji. In many other places naturalized rain tree is not considered a problem. DISTrIbUTIOn Native range Extensive cultivation has obscured the native range of rain tree. It is believed to be native in northern South America (Colombia, the Caribbean slope and the Orinoco drainage of Venezuela), and in Central America as far north as El Salvador. It is now widespread from Mexico south to Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. In these areas, it occurs in low-eleva- tion dry forests and grassland/savannah habitats. Current distribution Family  Fabaceae (alt. Mimosaceae), legume family Subfamily  Mimosoideae Non-preferred scientific names Albizia saman (Jacquin) F. Mueller Enterolobium saman (Jacquin) Prain ex King Inga salutaris Kunth. Inga saman (Jacquin) Willd Mimosa saman Jacquin Pithecellobium saman (Jacquin) Bentham Common names Pacific islands filinganga (Northern Marianas) gouannegoul, saman (French) gumorni spanis (Yap) kasia kula, mohemohe (Tonga) marmar (New Guinea) 'ohai (Hawai'i) rain tree, monkey pod, saman (English) tamalini, tamaligi (Samoa) trongkon-mames (Guam) vaivai ni vavalangi, sirsa (Fiji) Other regions acacia, palo de China (Philippines) algarrobo, algarrobo del país, carreto negro, delmont  Samanea saman (rain tree)  Rain tree is cultivated and naturalized throughout the tropics. In the Pacific, rain tree is known to occur on the following islands: American Samoa (Tutuila), Com- monwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Saipan, Rota), Federated States of Micronesia (Chuuk, Kosrae, Pohnpei), Fiji (Kanacea, Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu), French Polynesia (Íles Tubuai [Rurutu], Tahiti, Marquesas, Moorea, Raiatea), Guam, Hawai'i, Marshall Islands (Jaluit, Kwajalein), Niue, Palau (Koror), Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Pitcairn, Rotuma, Samoa ('Upolu), and Tonga (Tongatapu, 'Eua, Vava'u, Lifuka/Foa). The species is also naturalized in a number of the Caribbean Islands includ- ing Puerto Rico. It is almost certainly even more wide- spread than the foregoing list indicates. bOTAnICAL DeSCrIPTIOn Preferred scientific name  Samanea saman (Jacquin) Merrill guannegoul, samán (Spanish) gouannegoul, saman (French) Size Rain tree generally attains maximum heights of 15-25 m (50-80 ft). In rare cases it can reach a height of 50 m (160 ft). The crown typically reaches 30 m (100 ft) in diameter. Very large trees may reach 50-60 m (160-195 ft) in diam- eter. Rain trees usually have a short, stout trunk of about 1-2 m (3-6.5 ft) in diameter at breast height (dbh), but the trunk can attain 2-3 m (6.5-10 ft) dbh in exceptional cases. Under dense planting conditions, trees may attain greater height (to 40 m, 130 ft) with a narrower crown diameter than when planted in the open. Form Rain tree has a distinctive, umbrella-shaped crown. The crown is typically broad and domed; the horizontal spread is greater than the height when grown in spacious, open settings. Under plantation conditions, the crown is more vase-shaped. Flowers The tiny flowers (12-25 per head) are massed in pinkish heads 5-6 cm (2-2.4 in) across and about 4 cm (1.6 in) in rAIn Tree? The name rain tree has been attributed to: • The leaflets are light-sensitive and close together on cloudy days (as well as from dusk to dawn), allowing rain to fall through the canopy to the ground below. • The grass is often much greener under a rain tree than the surrounding grass. • A steady drizzle of honeydew is often created by sap-sucking insects. • Nectaries on the leaf petioles excrete sugary juice that sometimes falls from the tree like rain. • During heavy flowering, stamens can drop from the canopy like rain. height. The long, bicolored stamens (white in lower half and reddish above) give the whole inflorescence the ap- pearance of a powder puff or feather duster held slightly above the foliage. Thousands of heads are borne at the same time, covering the tree in pinkish bloom. The central flower in each head is larger, stalkless, has more petals, and is in- capable of forming a fruit; this flower is a nectar-produc- ing organ that attracts pollinators. Usually only one flower per head (rarely two) is pollinated and forms a fruit. Leaves Leaves are alternately arranged along twigs and have a prominent swelling (pulvinus) at the petiole base; stipules are present and threadlike; the leaf blades are twice-even- pinnately compound, arranged in 2-6 pairs of pinnae, each pinna bearing 6-16 diamond-shaped leaflets, shiny green above, dull and finely hairy beneath, 2-4 cm (0.8-1.6 in) long and 1-2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) wide, the apical leaflets larg- est. During dry periods trees are semi-deciduous, losing their leaves for a short period. Where there is a definite dry season, they may remain leafless for a period of weeks but refoliate quickly if there is adequate moisture. This gives the appearance that rain tree is "evergreen" in moister cli- mates. Fruit Mature pods are black-brown, oblong, lumpy, 10-20 cm long (4-8 in), 15-19 mm (0.6-0.8 in) wide, ca. 6 mm (0.25 in) thick, straight or slightly curved, not dehiscing but eventually cracking irregularly, and filled with a sticky, brownish pulp that is sweet and edible. Top: Flowers and new leaves. Bottom: Fruit in varying stag- es of ripeness. photos: C. ElEvitCh InTrODUCTIOn Rain tree (Samanea saman) is easily recognized by its char- acteristic umbrella-shaped canopy. When grown in the open, the tree usually reaches 15-25 m (50-80 ft) in height with a canopy diameter wider than the tree is tall. Rain tree is most important in the Pacific as a shade tree on small farms, along roads, in parks and pastures. The wood has limited use for carved bowls in local markets; it could be developed more widely as a commercial timber, comparing favorably to black walnut. A multitude of minor uses is documented for rain tree, most of them of purely local sig- nificance, but all could be explored for wider applicability. Rain tree naturalizes freely almost everywhere it has been introduced and is considered an invasive pest in Vanuatu and Fiji. In many other places naturalized rain tree is not considered a problem. DISTrIbUTIOn Native range Extensive cultivation has obscured the native range of rain tree. It is believed to be native in northern South America (Colombia, the Caribbean slope and the Orinoco drainage of Venezuela), and in Central America as far north as El Salvador. It is now widespread from Mexico south to Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. In these areas, it occurs in low-eleva- tion dry forests and grassland/savannah habitats. Current distribution Family  Fabaceae (alt. Mimosaceae), legume family Subfamily  Mimosoideae Non-preferred scientific names Albizia saman (Jacquin) F. Mueller Enterolobium saman (Jacquin) Prain ex King Inga salutaris Kunth. Inga saman (Jacquin) Willd Mimosa saman Jacquin Pithecellobium saman (Jacquin) Bentham Common names Pacific islands filinganga (Northern Marianas) gouannegoul, saman (French) gumorni spanis (Yap) kasia kula, mohemohe (Tonga) marmar (New Guinea) 'ohai (Hawai'i) rain tree, monkey pod, saman (English) tamalini, tamaligi (Samoa) trongkon-mames (Guam) vaivai ni vavalangi, sirsa (Fiji) Other regions acacia, palo de China (Philippines) algarrobo, algarrobo del país, carreto negro, delmont  Samanea saman (rain tree)  Rain tree is cultivated and naturalized throughout the tropics. In the Pacific, rain tree is known to occur on the following islands: American Samoa (Tutuila), Com- monwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Saipan, Rota), Federated States of Micronesia (Chuuk, Kosrae, Pohnpei), Fiji (Kanacea, Taveuni, Vanua Levu, Viti Levu), French Polynesia (Íles Tubuai [Rurutu], Tahiti, Marquesas, Moorea, Raiatea), Guam, Hawai'i, Marshall Islands (Jaluit, Kwajalein), Niue, Palau (Koror), Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Pitcairn, Rotuma, Samoa ('Upolu), and Tonga (Tongatapu, 'Eua, Vava'u, Lifuka/Foa). The species is also naturalized in a number of the Caribbean Islands includ- ing Puerto Rico. It is almost certainly even more wide- spread than the foregoing list indicates. bOTAnICAL DeSCrIPTIOn Preferred scientific name  Samanea saman (Jacquin) Merrill guannegoul, samán (Spanish) gouannegoul, saman (French) Size Rain tree generally attains maximum heights of 15-25 m (50-80 ft). In rare cases it can reach a height of 50 m (160 ft). The crown typically reaches 30 m (100 ft) in diameter. Very large trees may reach 50-60 m (160-195 ft) in diam- eter. Rain trees usually have a short, stout trunk of about 1-2 m (3-6.5 ft) in diameter at breast height (dbh), but the trunk can attain 2-3 m (6.5-10 ft) dbh in exceptional cases. Under dense planting conditions, trees may attain greater height (to 40 m, 130 ft) with a narrower crown diameter than when planted in the open. Form Rain tree has a distinctive, umbrella-shaped crown. The crown is typically broad and domed; the horizontal spread is greater than the height when grown in spacious, open settings. Under plantation conditions, the crown is more vase-shaped. Flowers The tiny flowers (12-25 per head) are massed in pinkish heads 5-6 cm (2-2.4 in) across and about 4 cm (1.6 in) in rAIn Tree? The name rain tree has been attributed to: • The leaflets are light-sensitive and close together on cloudy days (as well as from dusk to dawn), allowing rain to fall through the canopy to the ground below. • The grass is often much greener under a rain tree than the surrounding grass. • A steady drizzle of honeydew is often created by sap-sucking insects. • Nectaries on the leaf petioles excrete sugary juice that sometimes falls from the tree like rain. • During heavy flowering, stamens can drop from the canopy like rain. height. The long, bicolored stamens (white in lower half and reddish above) give the whole inflorescence the ap- pearance of a powder puff or feather duster held slightly above the foliage. Thousands of heads are borne at the same time, covering the tree in pinkish bloom. The central flower in each head is larger, stalkless, has more petals, and is in- capable of forming a fruit; this flower is a nectar-produc- ing organ that attracts pollinators. Usually only one flower per head (rarely two) is pollinated and forms a fruit. Leaves Leaves are alternately arranged along twigs and have a prominent swelling (pulvinus) at the petiole base; stipules are present and threadlike; the leaf blades are twice-even- pinnately compound, arranged in 2-6 pairs of pinnae, each pinna bearing 6-16 diamond-shaped leaflets, shiny green above, dull and finely hairy beneath, 2-4 cm (0.8-1.6 in) long and 1-2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) wide, the apical leaflets larg- est. During dry periods trees are semi-deciduous, losing their leaves for a short period. Where there is a definite dry season, they may remain leafless for a period of weeks but refoliate quickly if there is adequate moisture. This gives the appearance that rain tree is "evergreen" in moister cli- mates. Fruit Mature pods are black-brown, oblong, lumpy, 10-20 cm long (4-8 in), 15-19 mm (0.6-0.8 in) wide, ca. 6 mm (0.25 in) thick, straight or slightly curved, not dehiscing but eventually cracking irregularly, and filled with a sticky, brownish pulp that is sweet and edible. Top: Flowers and new leaves. Bottom: Fruit in varying stag- es of ripeness. photos: C. ElEvitCh


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