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โˆ™ 2012-02-06 09:20:00
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Equation of average speed

Does the speedometer of a car read average speed or instantaneous speed

A car travels 60 km in the first 2 hours and 68 km in the next 2 hours. What is the car's average speed

What is the frame of reference for a sunset

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Q: Which is at rest relative to a seated passenger in a moving car?
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What is at rest relative to a seated passsenger in a moving car?

Everything else in the car that is not itself rotating etc. is at rest relative to the passenger -- the seats, car body, dashboard, windows, etc, "At rest" is in this case just another way to say "moving at the same velocity."


A passenger in the rear car of a train moving at a steady speed is at rest relative to?

The train.


A passenger in the rear seat of a car moving at a steady speed is at rest relative to what?

The front seat of the car.


A passenger in the rear seat of a car moving at a steady speed is at rest relative to?

the front seat of the car I think.....


Which situation can you be at rest and moving at the same time?

Being at rest is a relative term. Relative to earth we are at rest when we are sitting down. However, you are moving because the earth is moving its orbit around the sun.


In which situation can you be at rest and moving at the same time?

Being at rest is a relative term. Relative to earth we are at rest when we are sitting down. However, you are moving because the earth is moving its orbit around the sun.


In which situation can be at rest and moving at the same time?

Being at rest is a relative term. Relative to earth we are at rest when we are sitting down. However, you are moving because the earth is moving its orbit around the sun.


Motion and rest are relative terms.what does this mean?

When an object is at rest, it is only at rest compaired to the observer. Consider that if you are in a moving vehicle then your passenger is at rest from your point of view, but to an observer, outside the vehicle the passenger and you are both in motion. Similarly to you inside the vehicle the observer outside is moving . as the earth itself is in motion, as well as the sun and in fact the whole galaxy, their is no way to absolutely define an at rest state, so all motion is measured relative to the observer, who is assumed to be at rest compaired to the observation.


In which situation can you be at rest and moving at the same time.?

As a passenger in a car !


Prove that rest and motion are relative terms?

Actually sitting on the earth we feel as if we are at rest. But relative to the pole star we are moving along a circular path. Also relative to the sun we are moving along an elliptical path around the sun. So actually speaking we are not at rest. In the same nothing is stationary. Everything is in motion. Rest means only a relative term.


All motion is relative?

All motion is relative. The question "is this object moving?" is in fact meaningless unless we specify "moving relative to what other object". Similarly, there is no such thing as "absolute rest": it's just as true to say that the road is moving at 50 km/h relative to your car as it is to say that your car is moving at 50 km/h relative to the road.


Can the train appear to be rest at rest while moving?

Yes and no. All motion is relative. When you say you are moving you mean in relation to something else. If are on the train and you choose something that moving alongside you at the same speed (another train for instance) then you are not moving relative to that, however you are moving in relation to the countryside. Both trains are moving in relation to a cow in the field.

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