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Arctic

The Arctic is the region around the Earth's North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole.

500 Questions

What is the arctic latitude?

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Geographically, the Arctic is that area around the north pole where the sun does not set at the summer soltice or rise at the winter soltice. This is latitude 66° 32' N which is called the Artic Circle. Climatically, the Arctic Region is defined as those northern areas where the July temperatures do not reach 50°F or 10°C. The latitude of these condions varies both north and south of the Arctic circle. Since they occur on all sides of the north pole, the Arctic, by either definition includes all longitudes.

What would happen if the icebergs melt?

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If icebergs were to melt, it would contribute to rising sea levels, impacting coastal communities and ecosystems. This would lead to increased flooding, erosion, and loss of habitat for many species that depend on these regions. Additionally, it would disrupt ocean currents and potentially alter weather patterns.

What is the water cycle of the Arctic?

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In the Arctic, the water cycle is similar to other regions but with some unique features due to the extreme cold temperatures. Water from the Arctic Ocean evaporates, forming sea ice and snow. Melting sea ice and snow contribute to freshwater sources in the region, while precipitation can fall as snow or rain. The frozen nature of the Arctic means that water storage in ice caps and glaciers is significant in this region.

More than a hundred types of mosses lichens and small flowering plants grow in the Arctic true or false?

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True. The Arctic region supports a diverse range of mosses, lichens, and small flowering plants, with over a hundred different species thriving in the harsh climate. These plants play a crucial role in the Arctic ecosystem, providing food and habitats for various wildlife species.

Why is the arctic ice cap not considered a glacier?

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The Arctic ice cap is a large mass of ice floating on the Arctic Ocean, whereas a glacier is a slow-moving mass of ice on land. Glaciers form from compacted snow over time, while the ice cap in the Arctic fluctuates with the seasons. Additionally, glaciers can carve out valleys and shape landscapes, which the Arctic ice cap does not do.

The Arctic Ocean is stratified and has limited vertical mixing of water because?

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The Arctic Ocean is stratified and has limited vertical mixing of water because of its cold temperatures and the presence of a halocline, which is a layer with a sharp decrease in salinity. This halocline acts as a barrier to vertical mixing by preventing the movement of water between different layers.

What is permafrost a characteristic of?

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Permafrost is a characteristic of frozen ground that remains below 0 degrees Celsius for two or more consecutive years. It is typically found in polar regions and high mountainous areas, where the ground freezes and thaws seasonally. The presence of permafrost can significantly impact ecosystems and infrastructure in these regions.

The tropical zones have stable year-round temperature because of their?

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The tropical zones have stable year-round temperatures because they receive consistent direct sunlight due to their proximity to the equator. This results in less variation in temperature throughout the year compared to other regions. Additionally, the high levels of humidity in tropical zones help regulate temperature by trapping heat.

How long do you have until the polar ice caps melt completely?

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The exact timing of complete melting of the polar ice caps is uncertain and heavily dependent on various factors such as greenhouse gas emissions and global warming trends. However, scientists warn that if current trends continue, some models predict that the Arctic could see ice-free summers by mid-century.

How is nunatak formed?

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Nunataks are formed when a rocky peak or ridge is left standing above a glacier or ice sheet due to erosion. The surrounding ice gradually erodes the softer rock, leaving behind the more resistant peak. Over time, the ice retreats, exposing the nunatak.

Is arctic water warm?

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Arctic waters are generally cold due to the region's high latitude and cold climate. The water temperatures in the Arctic Ocean can range from just below freezing to a few degrees above, but they are much colder than tropical or temperate waters.

What are some herbivore animal that lives in the arctic?

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Some herbivore animals that live in the Arctic include muskoxen, caribou (reindeer), Arctic hares, and lemmings. These animals have adapted to the cold climate and harsh conditions by developing thick fur and efficient metabolisms.

What would happen to arctic foxes if the snow and ice melted?

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Arctic foxes rely on snow and ice for hunting, camouflage, and denning. If the snow and ice melted, it could disrupt their ability to find food, hide from predators, and protect their young. This could lead to a decline in their population and threaten their survival in the Arctic environment.

Arctic animals can protect themselves from cold weather with?

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Arctic animals can protect themselves from cold weather with thick layers of fat or blubber to provide insulation, dense fur or feathers to trap heat, and specialized adaptations like smaller extremities to reduce heat loss. Some animals also huddle together in groups to share body heat and stay warm.

Is there hail in the Arctic?

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Hail is rare in the Arctic due to the cold temperatures that generally prevent the formation of thunderstorms needed for hail production. However, instances of hail have been observed in some parts of the Arctic during rare and extreme weather events.

What continent does the north pole pass through?

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Asked by Wiki User

It isn't. The geographic north pole is located in the Arctic Circle at a latitude of 90^N. This is in the middle of the Arctic Ocean which just happens to be (semi)permanently covered in a huge ice sheet. There is no land beneath it.

Is a ermine a omnivore or carnivore?

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Ermines are carnivores, meaning they primarily eat meat. They hunt small mammals, birds, and insects for their diet.

How much Arctic sea ice melts per year?

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Asked by Wiki User

A Priceless Pair of Photographs - an Alaskan Glacier [I think] - Taken from the same Vantage Point - 50 years apart.

In the First, the Glacier took up 90% of the Image. In the second, the Glacier took up just 15% of the Image.

This Q'n reflects the need to focus on Glacier loss.

All that remains is the Question "How do all of those millions who depend upon Glaciers intend to Cope after their Glacial Water is Gone?"

Here Find a Prime example of when Answers.com is irrelevant.

What part of the US does the Arctic Circle cross?

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The Arctic Circle crosses the state of Alaska in the United States. It passes through Alaska's northernmost region, including cities like Barrow and Deadhorse.

What are the jobs in the arctic region?

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Jobs in the Arctic region include roles in research (scientists, biologists), logistics (pilots, transportation experts), resource extraction (miners, oil workers), tourism (guides, hospitality staff), and government service (military personnel, administrators). These jobs are often specialized and require unique skills due to the challenging environmental conditions in the Arctic.

What are some plants that live in the polar tundra?

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Some plants that can be found in the polar tundra include mosses, lichens, dwarf shrubs like Arctic willow and Arctic moss, sedges, and grasses like Arctic cotton grass. These plants are adapted to survive in the harsh conditions of the tundra, such as cold temperatures, permafrost, and strong winds.

Is a arctic hare an omnivore?

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The Arctic Hare or Polar Rabbit (Lepus arcticus)is omnivorous. They primarily eat woody plants but also dine on grasses, leaves, buds, and berries. They are also known to eat meat.

Arctic animal starting with T?

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Asked by Wiki User

  • T-Rex
  • Tadpole
  • Tahr
  • Takin
  • Tamarin
  • Tanager
  • Tapaculo
  • Tapeworm
  • Tapir
  • Tarantula
  • Tarpan
  • Tarsier
  • Taruca
  • Tasmanian devil
  • Tasmanian Tiger
  • Tattler
  • Tayra
  • Teal
  • Tegus
  • Teledu (SE Asian mammal)
  • Tench
  • Tenrec
  • Termite
  • Tern
  • Terrapin
  • Terrier
  • Thrasher
  • Thrush
  • Thunderbird
  • Thylacine
  • Tick
  • Tiger
  • Tiger shark
  • Tilefish
  • Tinamou
  • Titi
  • Titmouse
  • Toad
  • Toadfish
  • Tomtit
  • Topi
  • Tortoise
  • Toucan
  • Towhee
  • Tragopan
  • Treecreeper
  • Triceratops
  • Trogon
  • Trout
  • Trumpeter bird
  • Trumpeter swan
  • Tsetse fly
  • Tuatara
  • Tuna
  • Turaco
  • Turkey
  • Turnstone
  • Turtle
  • Turtle Dove
  • one of those could be the answer

Arctic is not a continent?

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Asked by Wiki User

You are correct. The Arctic is not a continent; it is a region located at the northernmost part of the Earth surrounding the North Pole. It is mainly covered by ice and is made up of the Arctic Ocean and parts of various countries such as Canada, Russia, the United States, and others.

What are the scavengers in the Arctic?

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Scavengers in the Arctic include animals like ravens, foxes, and wolves. These animals play an important role in the ecosystem by feeding on leftover carcasses from other predators, helping to break down organic matter and recycling nutrients back into the environment.