Basque Language and Culture

The Basque People primarily live in the area known as the Basque Country, located around north-central Spain and south-western France.

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Basque Language and Culture

Are the Basque people Indo-Europeans?

No, they are not.

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Basque Language and Culture

Where in the world is the Basque language spoken?

The Basque Language, which is the language spoken by the Basque people, is currently used in Southern France and in Northern Spain.

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International Cuisine
Europe
Basque Language and Culture

What do the Basque people eat?

Dairy products, meat, seafood, and vegetablescharacterize the Basque cuisine.

Specifically, the Basque people traditionally engage in farming, fishing, and herding. They have access to fertile lands and to fish-rich ocean waters. They also raise livestock, among which sheep are favored and from which therefore lamb dishes are treasured.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is the history of the Basque language?

That it is an ancient language of southwestern Europe and that it may be an ancient language of Eurasia's Caucasus is the history of the Basque language.

Specifically, the Basque language is known to have been spoken before, during and after ancient Greek and Roman contacts with the Iberian Peninsula. It still is spoken in the modern equivalents of that ancient homeland: northwestern Spain and southwestern France. But according to some scholars, the Basque language's origins may have been elsewhere. If such is the case, then the history of the Basque language also will take in the rugged mountainscapes of the Eurasian Caucasus, from which herders oasis-hopped southeastward into Asia (and possibly southwestward through Asia and into Europe before the time of the Indo-Europeans).

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Basque Language and Culture

What are some common Basque last names?

iturribarria

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Basque Language and Culture

What have the Basque people been fighting for?

They have a language and culture and they want they own land.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is 'Welcome' when translated from English to Basque?

Ongi etorri! is a Basque equivalent of the English word "Welcome!"

Specifically, the adverb ongi means "well". The verb etorri translates as "to come". The pronunciation will be "ON-ghee ey-TOR-ree" by those who speak Guipuzcoan Basque.

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Basque Language and Culture

Did children work in Basque culture?

Yes, children always have helped out with work in Basque culture.

Specifically, business, farming, fishing, and grazing are all activities associated with Euzkadi ("The Basque Country"). They are activities which require discipline, observation, and skills which can be started quite early on in life. Additionally, traditional Basque inheritance procedures spotlight not the eldest but the fittest person to take over, and so it will be not only boys, but also girls, who develop impressive, precocious work habits.

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Basque Language and Culture

What constitutes the economics of the Basque people?

Farming, fishing, herding, small-scale business and industry, and tourism constitute the economics of the Basque people.

Specifically, the Basque people can be found along the coasts and nearby hilly/mountainous interiors of southwestern France and northwestern Spain. They have reputations as expert farmers, fishers, and herders. Additionally, they rank high in such small-scale businesses as area lodgings and restaurants.

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Ireland
Basque Language and Culture

What was the year in which the Basque people discovered Ireland?

It is unknown when or even if the Basque people discovered Ireland.

Specifically, the Celts of Ireland and the Basque of southwestern France and northwestern Spain exhibit genetic similarities regarding the Y-chromosome. The Celts may have originated in Eurasia, where the ancient Tokharian language is most related to Celtic languages and where the Tarim River Basin mummies preserve Celt-like fairness of skin and lightness of hair. The Basques also may have originated in Eurasia, where some scholars link their language -- unlike any other in the world -- to languages such as Georgian in the Caucasus.

It is known that the Celts ultimately settled in Ireland. It also is known that Ireland previously was settled by other peoples. But it thus far is unknown who the original discoverers of the Emerald Isle were.

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Basque Language and Culture

How are the Basque people unique?

Language is what predominantly makes the Basque people unique.

Specifically, the language can be found on both sides of the border between northern Spain and southern France. But it is unrelated to any of the other regional languages and in fact to any other world language. The southwestern part of Euzkadi ("The Basque Country") may show linguistic influences from Spanish even though knowledge of French and Spanish will not help those who seek comprehension or mastery of Euskara ("Basque").

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Basque Language and Culture

What is the Basque language?

A language which is spoken on both sides of the border between southern France and northern Spain is what the Basque language is.

Specifically, the language is not known to be related to any language in the region and in fact to any other language in the world. Some scholars link it to languages -- such as Georgian -- which are spoken in Eurasia's Caucasus. People will find the language typically called Euskara by its native speakers.

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Basque Language and Culture

What are three main cities associated with the Basque people?

Bilbo/Bilbao, Donostia/San Sebastián, and Gasteiz/Vitoria are three main cities associated with the Basque people.

Specifically, each city expresses key aspects of Euzkadi's ("Basque Country") cultural economics. Bilbo, Donostia, and Gasteiz have respective reputations as centers of fishing, tourism, and industry. The respective pronunciations of the names will be "BEEL-bo", do-NO-stya", and "ga-STEYS" in Basque.

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Basque Language and Culture

What challenges do the Basque people face?

Cultural integrity, economic survival, and political independence are some of the challenges which the Basque people face.

Specifically, the Basque people aim to preserve their language, which is specific to their region and unknown by most of Spain. They engage in activities -- particularly farming, fishing, herding, small-scale business and industry, and tourism -- which are lucrative for them but whose profitability can be affected by a national economy which may not do as well. They respect their past, which includes autonomy from Spain's monarchs and which may not find its best expression in national political structures.

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Basque Language and Culture

How did the Basque people develop communities?

Defense, language, and livelihood prompted the Basque people's articulation of their culture into one of communities.

Specifically, the Basque people articulate a culture which is distinct from that of Spain's other surviving peoples. They therefore formed communities to protect their unique language. They also realized that community life was necessary for families whose men could be absent for long periods of time, what with the demands of fishing Atlantic waters and herding throughout the nearby mountains.

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History of Ireland
Ireland
History of Spain
Basque Language and Culture

What did the Basque people bring to Ireland?

Mammals are what the Basque brought from northern Spain to Ireland.

Specifically, research indicates that the badgers, mountain hairs, pygmy shrews and pine martins of Ireland trace back to the fauna of northern Spain. It is suggested that people speaking very ancient Basque (or its ancestor) sailed from northern and northwestern Spain to Ireland. The migration may have taken place as recently as 8,000-17,000 years ago. It was accompanied by the stocking of boats with what - equipment, fauna, flora - was familiar to the Basque in their lands in modern-day France and Spain. It was followed quite some time later by peoples who had been neighbors of the Basques in Iberia (and possibly ancient Eurasia before that): the Celts.

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Basque Language and Culture

Where in Europe is the Basque culture from?

France and Spain are the places in Europe where the Basque culture can be found.

Specifically, the Basque people engage in economic activities which are typical of the region: crafts, farming, fishing, herding, manufacturing, and tourism. But they exhibit distinct cultural differences which are epitomized in their language. The Basque language remains unrelated to any other language in the world even though scholars have suggested links with languages such as Georgian within Eurasia's Caucasus.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is the name of the Basque people?

Euskaldunak is the name of the Basque people.

Specifically, the word is a noun in its plural form. The ending, pluralizing letter -k specifies that more than one Basque (Euskalduna) is involved. The pronunciation will be "EY-oo-SKAL-doo-NAK" by those who speak Guipuzcoan Basque.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is 'Hello' when translated from English to Basque?

Kaixo! is a Basque equivalent of the English word "Hello!"

Specifically, the word functions as a greeting. It is one of several greetings with which the visitor to Euzkadi ("The Basque Country") may be met. The pronunciation will be "keye-SHO" by those who speak Guipuzcoan Basque.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is so unusual about the Basque language?

That it is spoken within an area populated by speakers of Romance languages but that it is not related to any regional or any other world language is what is so unusual about the Basque language.

Specifically, the Basque language can be heard on both sides of the border separating southwestern France and northwestern Spain. But the vocabulary -- other than modern loan words -- cannot be predicted from knowledge of the region's predominant dialects and languages. The grammar (such as the declensions of nouns) likewise is unlike that of surrounding Romance languages, such as Catalan, French and Spanish.

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Basque Language and Culture

What struggles do the Basque people face in order to become a country?

The basque people and their party Eta , are fighting a violent cause to get a area free from Spain for the basque people.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is 'today' when translated from English to Basque?

Gaur is a Basque equivalent of the English word "today".

Specifically, the word functions as an adverb. As an important adverb of time, it tends to begin, not end (as happens sometimes in English), a phrase or sentence. The pronunciation will be "gowr" by those who speak Guipuzcoan Basque.

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Basque Language and Culture

What is 'Life is good' when translated from English to Basque?

Bizia ona da! is a Basque equivalent of the English phrase "Life is good!"

Specifically, the noun bizia is "life". The adjective ona means "good". The verb da means "is".

The pronunciation will be "BEE-zya O-na da" by those who speak Guipuzcoan Basque.

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Basque Language and Culture

What two countries would you visit to meet the Basque people?

France and Spain are the two main countries to be visited by those who seek to meet the Basque people.

Specifically, the Basque people live in Euzkadi ("The Basque Country"). They therefore may be found along the border of southwestern France in terms of the northern limits of their homeland. They also may be found along the border of northwestern Spain in terms of their southern limits.

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Basque Language and Culture

What statement best explains how geography helped the Basque culture survive?

Opportunities for defense and escape is a statement which explains how geography helped the Basque culture to survive.

Specifically, the culture of the Basque people can be found along the coasts and nearby interiors of southwestern France and northwestern Spain. Access to the sea means that the Basque people can use the water for defense or escape. The prevalence of hilly/mountainous terrain results in locations that are easier to defend than to attack.

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