Credit Reports

A report detailing one's borrowing and repayment record used to determine one's credit reputation. It is used by lending institutions to find the subject's credit worthiness.

14,529 Questions
Credit Reports
Credit

How do you fix an error on your credit report?

Fixing Errors on a Credit Report

Nobody can legally remove accurate and timely negative information from a credit report. But the law does allow you to request a reinvestigation of information in your file that you dispute as inaccurate or incomplete. There is no charge for this, so you may want to go the self-help route and consider credit repair independently. According to the Fair Credit Reporting Act you are entitled to a free copy of your credit report if you've been denied a loan, charge card, insurance, or job within the last 60 days. If your application is denied because of information supplied by a bureau or reporting agency, the company you applied to must provide you with that bureau or agency's name, address, and telephone number.

You can dispute mistakes or outdated items for free. Ask the reporting agency for a dispute form or submit your dispute in writing, along with any supporting documentation. Do not send them original documents. Clearly identify each item in your report that you dispute, explain why you dispute the information, and request a reinvestigation. If the new investigation reveals an error, you may ask that a corrected version of the report be sent to anyone who received your report within the past six months.

Job applicants can have corrected reports sent to anyone who received a report for employment purposes during the past two years. When the reinvestigation is complete, the reporting agency must give you the written results and a free copy of your report if the dispute results in a change. If an item is changed or removed, the credit bureau cannot put the disputed information back in your file unless the information provider verifies its accuracy and completeness, and the credit bureau gives you a written notice that includes the name, address, and phone number of the provider. You also should tell the creditor or other information provider in writing that you dispute an item.

Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider then reports the item to any bureau or reporting agency, it must include a notice of your dispute. In addition, if you are correct - that is, if the information is inaccurate - the information provider may not use it again. If the reinvestigation does not resolve your dispute, have the credit bureau include your version of the dispute in your file and in future reports. Remember, there is no charge for a reinvestigation.

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Credit

Can a satisfied judgment be taken off of your credit report?

A satisfied judgment can be taken off your credit, if it is inaccurate. If the judgment is yours, it will remain for the full reporting period allowed by law.

Here is more advice:

  • I have a satisfied judgment on my credit report. We satisfied this judgment 5 years ago. However, the plaintiff the judgment was awarded to, never bothered to give the court an order to mark the judgment satisfied. And I didn't know at the time that I could do it myself. I went down to the court Friday and gave them a 'request to vacate judgment' form. I have to wait a week to see if they will do it. If they don't, I'm taking the plaintiff in this judgment to court. I'm going to sue him for the amount of the satisfied judgment times the 5 years it's been reported to the credit bureaus. The credit bureaus are worthless and they are no help at all. They don't investigate anything. I found a lot of interesting websites with lots of info on how to fix errors on your credit report. If you want more info, email me and I'll send you a list of the URLs I found.
  • The previous answer was a bit scary. Credit reporting is not the responsibility of the judgment plaintiff, nor the courts, nor the bureaus themselves. If a consumer is sued over financial matters that typically show on a credit report (judgments, tax liens, foreclosures and bankruptcies) those actions need their proper disposition. Obtaining that disposition is not anyone else's responsibility. It is up to the defendant to find out what steps to take to clear their credit. A lawsuit for failing to do so would most likely be unsuccessful.
  • The lawsuit that he is speaking of is true and is valid, when and only after you have requested in writing, from the person who has put the Judgement on you, the filing of a satisfaction of Judgement, if they do not file within 14 day of receiving the written request then you can sue for the amount of the Judgement Plus 50 dollars according to California state law Code of Civil Procedure section 116.850. (116.850. (a) If full payment of the judgment is made to the judgment creditor or to the judgment creditor's assignee of record, then immediately upon receipt of payment, the judgment creditor or assignee shall file with the clerk of the court an acknowledgment of satisfaction of the judgment. (b) Any judgment creditor or assignee of record who, after receiving full payment of the judgment and written demand by the judgment debtor, fails without good cause to execute and file an acknowledgment of satisfaction of the judgment with the clerk of the court in which the judgment is entered within 14 days after receiving the request, is liable to the judgment debtor or the judgment debtor's grantees or heirs for all damages sustained by reason of the failure and, in addition, the sum of fifty dollars ($50).)
  • Regarding the above note: Successfully petitioning for a Motion to Satisfy Judgement does nothing more than show that the judgment was satisfied within the negative entry in your credit report. It will remain in your Credit Report (showing satisfied) for 7 years as allowed by law. Now, if someone knows in DETAIL (please be specific with your answer along with Links if referenced) how to truly remove a satisfied/paid judgment within the 7 years then please let us all know.

It should be removed automatically after seven years, but even a judgment that's satisfied can't be removed before then. Your credit history - the good and bad - is reported for a period of seven years.

I went through the same situation with a satisfied judgment that wasnt updated by the plaintiff. However, I found the credit bureaus helpful b/c I was able to go online and dispute it through annualcreditreport.com along with other stuff I know I paid. They updated it within a week and I had about 5 accounts updated (even some I know I still owed) I pays to stay on top of your credit, some companies may change names, lenders, go out of business (you never know) So, my advice is to dispute it on your credit report. Anyway, Good Luck with your lawsuit.

I agree with the above. I recently disputed a judgment that was satisfied but it wasn't being reported that way and they just deleted it.

A satisfied judgment should stay on your credit report for 7 years from the last activity. It can only be removed by the court that placed in on your credit report or by the credit bureau reporting it. You can request to both to verify the account is yours and if they judgment is not verified it can be removed.

A satisfied judgment does not have to stay on for 7 years at all. This is a myth. You must understand the law. It states that derogatory entries can stay on your report for 7 years, not mandatory that it will. The key is can stay on!! That part of the FCRA is in place for people who do not check there credit regularly. So it gives a limit to the holder of the debt or plaintiff to pursue resolution to get debt paid!!! To get removed all you have to do is get notice from original plaintiff that through the courts the debt has been paid. They will acknowledge this and get you a statement letter of satisfaction. Take that letter to the court that rendered the Judgement and they will update. The next step is in writing contact the Credit Bureaus and show cause for a dispute! The cause will be that per the original plaintiff the derogatory entry should be moved. They will have to investigate this for you and when they call the original plaintiff they will not respond and the Bureau will remove within 31 days. I have helped people get over 20 judgments removed this way!

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Credit Reports
Currency Conversions

Is japaness YEn weaker than Indian rupee?

If every country currency started at the same time with a 1 to 1 exchange rate to others, you could say that since that time, a country with a more expensive currency has had a stronger economy, more or less.

However, this is not the case. Exchange rates are fixed at various times in history and they can change at any moment if the government decides to do it.

For instance, for those two currencies, here are the exchange rates to the US dollar over some years:

"Currency Code 2000 1990 1980 1970 1960 1950

Indian Rupee INR 44.942 17.505 7.8629 7.5 4.7619 4.7619

Japanese Yen JPY 107.76 144.79 226.74 360 360 361.1 "

Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_exchange_rates

This gives following value of the Indian rupie in yen over the years:

2000 1990 1980 1970 1960 1950

2.40 8.27 28.84 48.00 75.60 75.83

So if one Indian rupie is 2.40 yen in 2000, it was 75.83 yen in 1950. Since that time, it has always lost in value in comparison to the yen.

Read more: If japan is too advanced than India than why one Indian rupee= 2.40yen? | Answerbag http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/602861#ixzz1D9wpodAY

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating

What will happen if you do not pay your credit cards?

  • The question of what "will" happen is not one that can be answered because there are numerous avenues a creditor can take. However, we can say what is likely to happen. First, they will report your late payments to the credit agencies and damage your credit rating (in addition to their late fees of course). Then, when the delinquency reaches a certain point (180 days is common) their GAP accounting rules require that they realize the loss and charge the debt off. This charge off also goes on your credit. A charge off essentially means they have tried to get their money back but have exhausted reasonable attempts. At this point they can take you to court to sue you for a judgment and maybe garnish your wages, or simply send you to a collection agency who will hound you. Court time costs money, so you're more likely to see option number 2. Many states have time limits on debt collection, you may want to check the laws in your area. If these consequences don't sound so good, call the card company and negotiate a lower rate and payment, offer to settle the account for a partial amount (you may have to borrow from friends or family to get the cash to do this) or meet with a bankruptcy lawyer to discuss chapter 7 or 13 protection.
  • Adding to the above answer: 1. When a lender sues a consumer for a defaulted credit card or loan, they may also seek compensation through the judgment for their attorney fees and associated court costs to be paid for by the consumer. So, in that context, it would not expensive for the lender to take the consumer to court. 2. There are no "time limits on debt collections". HOWEVER, there ARE "statutes of limitation" laws but these pertain to the how long a creditor has (in years) to SUE a consumer for the unpaid debt. If the statute in your state is 6 years, and you haven't paid on the debt in 7 years, you may still be contacted to pay the bill but the creditor can take no action if you do not. Also important to note is that the statue term BEGINS with the date of the LAST PAYMENT the consumer made, not the date that the line of credit was first opened. Certainly, it would seem rather stupid for a lender or debt purchaser to attempt to collect on a debt that is no longer showing up on a credit report and for which the lender has no power to force repayment via the courts, but it does happen. 3. Finally, laws vary state to state on the number of years before a statue expires as well as what specific action a lender may take, if any, to force repayment of a debt through a civil judgment. 4. "Written-off" and "charged-off" are not the same thing and it is helpful to know the difference. Charged-off means the account has gone 180 days (approx. 6 months) without a payment, the account will have been closed down and, most likely, the balance is now due in full to the lender. While it is still possible to negotiate a monthly repayment of the debt, the lender is not legally required to do so and can demand the full outstanding balance be paid immediately. Written-off accounts have been reported as a loss for the lender as unrecoverable. If an account is written-off by the lender, they may report this to the IRS and you may become responsible for taxes on the unpaid balance. Finally, I am not an attorney and am not offering legal advice. While there is helpful information on line, the best thing to do is to consult with a LOCAL attorney in your area (and I stress local to you...not a debt negotiation company who happens to have an attorney affiliated with them).
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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Credit

What happens to items on your credit report after seven years?

Generally, after seven years most information must be deleted from your credit reports with the exception of bankruptcies which can be reported for up to 10 years.

Here are more opinions and answers from other WikiAnswerers:

  • Most derogatory items, such as late payments, collection accounts and charge offs, fall off seven years from the DATE OF FIRST DELINQUENCY. And, as alluded to in the other response, there are certain items, such as bankruptcy filings, which can be legally shown for ten years from the date of discharge. Some items, such as unpaid tax liens, student loans and child support obligations have no statute of limitations and can legally be shown on your credit report forever. They will show for 7 to 10 years from the date they are paid, or the date of their legal disposition. Positive credit history can also be shown on your credit report for more than 7 years. Since it is simply good credit history, there is no need to worry about something old and positive that shows.
  • So what happens if you have an ivestigation done on the account. I have seen where they will then change the date of last activty to reflect the entry. So what can be done at that point. The seven years just keep going on and on. Since the 7 years is from the DATE OF FIRST DELINQUENCY, last activity does not change the allowable time on your credit report.
  • To the point regarding investigations, it can happen when an investigation takes place, the collection agency or creditor will refresh the account, and 7 years will just keep on going. This just happened to me with a library late fee from three years ago that I didn't know about until I recently found it on my Experian credit report. So I did an investigation because I didn't know what it was and it brought the account current. Because of that, I just paid it, although I wish I would have known three years ago; the infamous seven years now starts over again. THIS IS NOT CORRECT. I Restate - It is from the DATE OF FIRST DELINQUENCY. So even if you're young, check ALL THREE credit reports every year! I only used to check one, and in this case the library only reported to Experian. Shortly the right to obtain all three reports will be free for everyone in the U.S. so make sure you take advantage of it!
  • Disputing or investigating items on your credit report do not cause them to "go on" for another 7 years. The length of time derogatory information may show in your credit file is established by the Fair Credit Reporting Act at 7 years. The law was amended in 2003 to give a strict formula by which this date is established and to force Data Furnishers to identity it within 90 days of reporting the account (as a collection or charge off). This date may not be displayed on the format that a consumer sees, but it is in the file itself and can be requested from any Credit Reporting Agency. If a creditor were to change THIS DATE, it would be a violation of the FCRA. The term for this offense is "re-aging". Disputing and investigating items does cause the tradeline to be "updated". The date any account was last reported to the bureaus is the date that causes a deduction in credit scores. This may be the source of confusion. Updating an account because of a dispute, investigation or payment is not illegal, as long as the "date of last activity" does not change. Updating an account does not cause it to remain another 7 years.
  • I just want to remind people that when you receive a letter from your creditor that offers a one, last time solid payment, to pay off the debt, remember that it does NOT wipe away that debt history on your credit report. I was so amazed because they made me an offer, but when they sent me the offer "form" it was so shallow it wasn't even signed by an official! It was just initialed and even the letter heading looked tacky. The credit agency said they had no other "form" available. I told them over the phone that I thought I should show it to a lawyer first and the main man "Zeke" from California who handled my account got so upset he threatened to call off the "whole deal" and then immediately hung up on me. I then went to the Internet and found many other complaints against this NCO Financial Institution and many other NCO co. across the nation. So, I'll just keep on paying my present monthly payment of $25.00 for a hospital bill that I had missed 2 payments on due to unemployment and forget any future "deals" with NCO because they are what they are...and it's not good.
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Credit Reports
Credit

How do you remove a bankruptcy from your credit report?

Any account included in a bankruptcy remains on your personal credit report for a maximum of 7 years from the date the bankruptcy was filed. The bankruptcy itself, listed in the public record information section of a credit report, remains for either 7 years from the filing date if it was a Chapter 13, or 10 years from the filing date if it was a Chapter 7, 11 or 12. Source: Experian

More Information:

A bankruptcy can be removed from your credit report. I know two people who have done it.Basically how credit repair like this works is you, or attorneys you hire, challenge negative marks on your credit report. The Fair Credit Reporting Act - - gives you the right to dispute anything on your credit report. Once the credit reporting agency contacts the creditor to verify the account they have 30 days to respond with verification. If they do not respond the mark is removed. If they do respond you can challenge again and ask for real proof. I don't know the details of what is required but it can get to the point where they have to provide signed contracts, a list of all payments and bills, etc. What usually happens is the creditor does not respond and it is removed. The same is true of a bankruptcy, often the court does not get the information to the credit reporting agency so the bankruptcy is removed.That doesn't mean they can definitely remove a bankruptcy, or anything else. They may or may not. Obviously if the mark on your credit is not accurate it is a lot easier to have taken care of. I had credit issues caused by id theft that I was unable to do much about, but a credit repair agency quickly removed all the negative items and increased my score over 200 points. I know others who had legitimate bad marks, they seem to be able to get most of them removed but not all.

Of course, this doesn't remove the actual bankruptcy, or any debts owed. It just removes them from your credit reports

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Mortgages
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating

Is a credit score of 689 good?

yes. it is average. anthing above 700 is considered good.

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Credit Reports
Grammar
English Spelling and Pronunciation

What is contraction for had not?

had't

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Credit Reports
Video Games

How do you get free Air Rivals credits?

I hope by free you mean that you don't have to pay real money. If so, there are some people in the game that have a lot of money, and will be willing to get some credit onto your account for a trade inside the game.

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Personal Finance
Credit Reports
Money Management
Credit

What is a credit score?

Credit ScoresFor years, creditors have been using credit scores to determine if you'd be a good risk for credit cards and auto loans. More recently, credit scores have been used to help creditors evaluate your ability to repay home mortgage loans. Here's how scoring works.

Scoring is a system creditors use to help determine whether you will be able to pay your future bills on time.

Information about you and your financial experiences, such as your bill-paying history, the number and type of accounts you have, late payments, collection actions, outstanding debt, and the age of your accounts, is collected from your application and your credit report.

Using a statistical program, creditors compare this information to the past performance of consumers with similar profiles. A scoring system awards points for each factor that helps predict who is most likely to repay a debt. A total number of points -- a credit score -- helps predict how creditworthy you are, that is, how likely it is that you will repay a loan and make the payments when due.

Because your credit report is an important part of many credit scoring systems, it is very important to make sure it's accurate before you submit an application. To get copies of your report, contact the three major reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian (formerly TRW), and Trans Union.

A credit score is based on real data and statistics, so it usually is more reliable than subjective or judgmental methods. It treats all applicants objectively. Judgmental methods typically rely on criteria that are not systematically tested and can vary when applied by different individuals.

To develop a credit score model, a creditor selects a random sample of its customers, or a sample of similar customers if their sample is not large enough, and analyzes it statistically to identify characteristics that relate to creditworthiness.

Then, each of these factors is assigned a weight based on how strong a predictor it is of who would be a good risk. Each creditor may use its own scoring model, different scoring models for different types of loans, or a generic model developed by a scoring company.

Under the law, a credit score may not take into account certain characteristics � such as race, sex, marital status, national origin, or religion � as factors. However, creditors are allowed to use age in properly designed scoring systems. But any scoring system that includes age must give equal treatment to elderly applicants.

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Personal Finance
Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating
Money Management
Credit

Will declined credit card transaction affect your credit rating?

How embarrassing! It is more like a red flag (to you) that you have an issue with the credit card company. It could be in error, but it may also mean that you have met or exceeded your limit. Contact the credit card company as soon as possible to solve the issue.

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Auto Loans and Financing
Repossession
Credit Reports

Does credit acceptance corp defer car payments?

No they do not. And they will repo your car if you are too far behind. They may tell you that they will repossess your car if you are 10 days late, but it is a tactic used to scare you. They would loose more money trying to repo your car than waiting on your payment after 10 days.

312313314
Credit Reports
Lyrics and Sheet Music
Credit

What are the lyrics to the new Free Credit report commercial on the golf course?

Here are the lyrics. (To the best of my knowledge)

A young man with ambition met an old man at the top

Asked him if he had a secret and the old man stopped and thought and said

FREE 'cause it's how it oughta be, my brotha

CREDIT 'cause you need a loan for one thing or another

SCORE 'cause they break it down to one simple number that you can use

DOT to take a break 'cause the name is kinda long

COM an honor of the internet that it's on

put it all together at the end of the song it gives you free credit score.com and I'm done

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating

Is 591 credit score bad?

According to SmartMoney.com:

"Scores above 700 indicate a relatively low credit risk, according to Fair Isaac, while scores below 600 indicate relatively high risk and may result in credit denial or elevated interest rates."

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Credit

What is the Equal Credit Opportunity Act?

the person Equal Credit Opportunity ActThis act, passed in 1974 and monitered by The Federal Trade Commission, ensures that all consumers are given an equal chance to obtain credit. This doesn�t mean all consumers who apply for credit get it. Factors such as income, expenses, debt, and credit history are considerations for creditworthiness. The ECOA prohibits descrimination upon based on the following :

1. Race

2. Color

3. Religion

4. National Origin

5. Sex

6. Marital Status

7. Age (provided that the applicant has the capacity to enter into a binding contract

8. Receipt of income from any public assistance program

9. Good faith exercise of any rights under the Consumer Protection Act

If you have a credit application denied, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act requires creditors to specify why � if you ask. For example, the creditor must tell you whether you were denied because you have "no credit file" with a credit reporting agency (CRA) or because the CRA says you have "delinquent obligations." The ECOA also requires creditors to consider additional information you might supply about your credit history. You may want to find out why the creditor denied your application before you contact the CRA.

To go along with the Consumer Protection Act, here are summaries of the Fair Credit Reporting Act and the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. When combined these Acts make our consumer rights. For more information visit the Related Link.

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Mortgages
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating

Can you buy a home with a credit score of 518?

Yes. there are several ways to buy a home with bad credit. one of them is to homeowner financing, you can find deals on the newspapers, craigslist, and many other sources of information.Also, through an real estate investor, the real estate investor qualifies you as long as you have enough money for the downpayment, expect higher interest rate than the convencional loans, and as long as you pay your new mortgage for some time (about two years), on time you can renegotiate, refinance, through a financial institution other than the investor. either you are ready or not to buy a house the smart thing to do is to fix your Fico score. Learn everything you can about creative financing, real estate vocabulary, contact a real estate agent and ask for advise. Remember the more informed you are, the more likely you will get a better deal.

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Credit Reports

How often does your credit report get updated?

Credit information is forwarded to the three major credit reporting agencies by lenders and creditors, so the exact reporting varies. Usually it is reported monthly. This makes it important for consumers to have access to credit information on a regular basis.

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating

How many points on your credit score is paying off a judgment worth?

Paying off a JudgmentSettling judgments will have only a slight effect (if any) on your credit score. What it WILL effect is your ability to attain further credit - you may be denied credit due to an outstanding judgment or tax lien, regardless of what your FICO score is.

Paying off collections, especially older collections, will drop your FICO score initially. In the long term, of course, your score will be much better off, and some collection companies may even delete their trade line all together once payment is received, but do not count on this. If you need points in a hurry (applying for a home/car loan), do NOT start paying collections off. You will be doing yourself a grave disservice. Wait until the deal is done and pay these off either at closing or after the transaction is completed.

Finally, one recent 30 day late will drop a FICO score by approx. 50 points - a considerable sum, regardless of account type. Most people make the common mistake of refinancing their mortgage and skipping their last payment, thinking the deal will be done before anyone will notice the delinquency and saving themselves a mortgage payment. THIS IS A MISTAKE! I have seen many people lose their approvals (and thus their loans) because of this, and the results are quite devastating.

More Information:

  • PAYING a judgment will have no impact on your credit score. Getting the legal disposition (in this case a satisfaction), having that recorded, and informing the credit bureaus of this CAN impact your score, but only marginally, per the previous answer to this question. Exact scoring models are a closely guarded trade secret. Information about scores is mainly empirical and comes from trial and error. The reason that paying off collection accounts or getting the disposition to a legal item recorded and properly notated on your credit report affects your score so slightly is that 35% of your score is calculated from recent activity, such as late payments, payments on collection accounts (even payment in full), etc. This is why paying off derogatory items right before a purchase might not impact your scores in the way you anticipate. If possible, pay off or settle those collections and charge offs now, get dispositions recorded for any outstanding legal items, pay all accounts in a timely manner...do this for a full year, and THEN you will see significant improvement in your credit score.
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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Debt Consolidation

Should you hire a credit repair company?

Hiring a Credit Repair CompanyHere are some things to know about credit repair companies. By law (see The Credit Repair Organizations Act), credit repair services must give you a copy of the "Consumer Credit File Rights Under State and Federal Law" before you sign a contract to repair credit. Credit repair companies also must give you a written contract that spells out your rights and obligations. Read these documents before signing the contract. The law contains specific protections for you. For example, a credit repair company cannot: make false claims about their services; charge you until they have completed the promised services; or perform any services until they have your signature on a written contract and have completed a three-day waiting period. During this time, you can cancel the contract without paying any fees. Your contract must specify: the payment terms for services, including their total cost; a detailed description of the services to be performed; how long it will take to achieve the results; any guarantees they offer; and the company's name and business address.

Here are more opinions and answers from other FAQ Farmers:

  • Although there are a lot of scam artists out there peddling credit repair services, some are legit. Of course using a credit repair company is totally up to you. Just keep in mind that the credit repair company shouldn't charge you any money up front until they have performed the services that they agreed to perform - it's the law. Also, you must be fully involved in the credit repair process; no credit doctor or company can successfully restore your credit history without your participation. You should also read and completely understand your contract and be able to get out of it at anytime you choose to without penalty or obligation. Last but not least, you should understand that there is nothing a credit repair company can do that you can't do for yourself.
  • A credit repair company can do nothing an individual can do. So the only reason for one to use a credit repair company would be for help. If the individual can't or doesn't want to learn the credit system.

Also consider finding a consultant that is a member of a trade association that is regulated by the credit service industry. Credit Consultants Association is such an organization.

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating
Sears

When does Sears update to credit bureaus?

Usually every thirty days

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Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Credit

Should you re-open a previously closed credit card account?

No. If the account has been closed, you would need to re-apply if you wanted an account.

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Immigration
Credit Reports
Facebook
English Spelling and Pronunciation

If your name is misspelled on your I-797 form who do you approach to have it fixed?

Simply contact the immigration office where the I-797 come from and they will fix it.

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Credit Reports

What is in an investigative consumer report?

An investigative credit report is one that goes beyond a typical credit report, with more detail. It might include very personal details such as your reputation and personal character. They get this through interviews with neighbors, friends, business associates, etc.

287288289
Repossession
Credit and Debit Cards
Credit Reports
Car Rentals

Will stopping payment on crashed rental car affect credit?

Credit? No. But if you crashed the rental car, then stopped payment on it you could be arrested and/or sued.

** sure it would- the company can send you to collections and that would be on your report- affecting your credit.

283284285
Credit Reports
Improving Your Credit Rating
The Difference Between

What are investigative consumer reports?

An "investigative consumer report" is a detailed form of a credit report that involves interviews with your neighbors or acquaintances about your lifestyle, character, and reputation.

Investigative consumer reports may be used in connection with insurance and employment applications. You'll be notified in writing when a company orders such a report. The notice will explain your right to request certain information about the report from the company you applied to. If your application is rejected, you may get additional information from the credit reporting agency (CRA). However, the CRA does not have to reveal the sources of the information.

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