Insomnia

Insomnia is a sleep disorder which someone is not able to fall or stay asleep as long as they need. It can lead to unnecessary stress and irritable moods during the day.

Asked in Insomnia, Cough and Cold Medicine

Can cough syrup with codeine cause insomnia?

User Avatar
It depends. For many people codeine tends to make them drowsy. For others, it can give "energy". Also, if you take more than the indicated dosage of codeine it may cause insomnia.
Asked in Exercise, Medication and Drugs, Coffee, Insomnia

Is it bad to drink coffee before bed?

User Avatar
The caffeine will keep you up and alert, so it would be difficult to sleep well. The caffeine will keep most people alert. Many people have the opposite reaction. The stimulant settles out the imbalance and the mind settles down. Rather than being hyper, one becomes calm.
Asked in Insomnia

What is the fear of having insomnia called?

User Avatar
insomniphobia? that sounds quite scientific!
Asked in Parenting and Children, Insomnia

What do you do if your child keeps waking up in the middle of the night?

User Avatar
Some children just wake up more than others. The reasons can vary with age, but there are usually some simple explanations. Babies need to get into a routine. If you just hear them stirring, or even whimpering a little, it doesn't hurt to just settle themselves back in. They usually will fall back asleep on their own. If they begin crying, and continue to cry, they are usually trying to let you know they are not comfortable. They could be hungry, wet, or just in need of a little comforting. Some say that you will spoil them by going to them in the night, but after raising my own, that simply isn't true. As long as you take care of their needs, and then lay them back in their own bed to go back to sleep, you are simply helping them to get a better night's rest. This will help establish patterns, even if it wears you out in the beginning. In the long run, it will pay off. There are other issues that can also be a problem. Colic is somewhat common in infants. If their little belly seems blown up, or they just cry and cry, and you cannot comfort them, this could be an issue. Check with their doctor. It is usually easily treated with a new formula, or anti-gas drops. As toddlers get older, the reasons begin to change. If they are waking up throughout the night, it could have to do with a smaller bladder. They may need to use the restroom, or they may have wet the bed. If bedwetting is a consistent problem, keep a change of linens and pajamas on hand. Do not fuss at them, or make them feel bad. They couldn't help it. Having the stuff on hand makes it so it can be dealt with quickly, and they can get right back to sleep. Also, their imaginations are beginning to grow, so they may be insecure. Any noise can be the monster under the bed. You may also want to consider factors such as passing headlights, nearby train tracks, and hot water heaters that click on throughout the night. Also, the mattresses in most toddler beds are pretty cheaply made. Try laying on the child's bed. See if you are still comfortable in twenty minutes. In our youngest daughter's case, a new mattress made all the difference. Other toddlers are coming into an age that they want to test their limits. Three year olds can sniff out weakness like a lioness. You have to be firm, consistent, and as drama free as possible. After you talk to them, and make sure there is no real problem, promptly walk them straight back to their bed. Keep in mind that you children are full of energy. If they spent the afternoon watching television or sitting in their room playing with toys, you are probably not going to get them to stay in that bed. You have to do something to burn off the energy, give them their bath, have a little quiet time, and then send them to bed. Sometimes, there are more serious or deep seated issues going on. Sexual/Physical Abuse Night Terrors Hallucinations Schizophrenia Sleep Apnea These are more rare, but can be a possibility. There will often be daytime symptoms to go along with these problems. If the issue seems very severe, or persistent, you need to talk to your child's doctor. They can evaluate the situation, and maybe even order a sleep study. There are therapies, changes in habits, natural cures, and in some situations, medications that can help.
Asked in Insomnia

How did adam young get insomnia?

User Avatar
When you go 2 weeks without sleep you begin to develop insommnia. Then a month and you have Adam's current stage (on and off for 3 months).
Asked in Insomnia

Do I need a doctor's note for insomnia?

User Avatar
that depends on what for if it involves work or school or other legally binding things your required to do then yes u will need a doctors note
Asked in Insomnia

Can you go to a hospital to get insomnia cures?

User Avatar
A doctor at a hospital could certainly prescribe a sleeping aid, but your best bet is to try to find the root cause of what is disturbing your sleep cycles. Cutting out caffeine, more exercise, reducing stress and creating a peaceful environment before bed are all helpful in combating insomnia. If these recommendations do not help then make an appointment with your general physician for a check up to rule out any possible illnesses that could be causing sleep disturbances.
Asked in Insomnia

Is there such thing as partial insomnia?

User Avatar
Yes. There are many sufferers of it. But if someone doesnt get enough sleep all of a sudden, and it only happens once, then it is not partial insomnia. If this happens for many days, then it is.
Asked in Insomnia

Can meditation cause insomnia?

User Avatar
Since I started meditating I have found it harder to sleep, my mind is simply too aware, too present, to drift into sleep... what shall I do? You know, I also suffered insomnia from meditation. At first doing meditation was relaxing, then i tried to improve the skill. I think trying to focus while meditating has caused my brain somewhat difficult to shut down. I continually aware of the surrounding while I was shutting my eyes. Gradually my sleep pattern disturbed so much, I slept less and less, to the point I didnt sleep for 2 days straight. It really freaked me out. It was then impossible to drift off. I sought help from church...but they didnt calm me a bit, some people blamed me for doing evil thing such meditation, because it's probably evil things had possessed me, and other equivalent crap diagnoses. Because of my fragile condition at that time, added by guilty feeling endorsed by church community, it had worsened my condition even more. I became depressed because of anxiety built up caused primarily by insomnia. I keep praying God to relieve my suffering. Until my prayer answered by someone advised me to go to this psychiatrist in town. She treated me with depression medication and sleeping pills. My psychiatrist is just like angel sent from heaven. Just after 3 days taking medication, my condition 80% improved. I continued my medication for about 6 months. Three months later...free from sleeping pills, i did have relapse by having anxious thoughts, but this time I was aware of the symptoms and back to my medication for another 3 month. I think I didnt finish my depression treatment completely at the first time, because I worried of the side effect for taking prolong sleeping pills. Now I consider myself 98%recovered. After one year and half ordeal caused by MEDITATION. I believe that it's not suitable for everyone. Just like people allergic to certain food, I'm not built for meditation. There is good reading from Mary Garden. She shared her experience about Meditation. She saw lots of bad effects caused by meditation. In fact there are many people having nervous breakdowns, and many need to be institutionalized. Read it! I'm glad, I'm still saved. God still loves me.. MEDITATION AND INSOMNIA 1. If our skeletal muscular system is isometrically contracted (hardened) towards our head we would be hyperactive and feel like moving. 2. If the muscles that raise the lower jaw are hardened we would be more aware of our body and also of what is happening around us. If the above combination occurs after meditating in the evening or night we would be insomniac on that night.
Asked in Insomnia

What is insomnia?

User Avatar
Insomnia is a condition in which you have trouble falling or staying asleep. Some people with insomnia may fall asleep easily but wake up too soon. Others may have trouble with both falling asleep and staying asleep. The end result is poor quality sleep that doesn't leave you feeling refreshed when you wake up. There are two types of insomnia. The most common type is called secondary insomnia. More than 8 out of 10 people with insomnia are believed to have secondary insomnia. Secondary means that the insomnia is a symptom or a side-effect of some other problem. Some of the problems that can cause secondary insomnia include: Certain illnesses, such as some heart and lung diseases Pain, anxiety, and depression Medicines that delay or disrupt sleep as a side-effect Caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, and other substances that affect sleep Another sleep disorder, such as restless legs syndrome; a poor sleep environment; or a change in sleep routine In contrast, primary insomnia is not a side-effect of medicines or another medical problem. It is its own disorder, and generally persists for least a month or longer. Insomnia is a common health problem. It can cause excessive daytime sleepiness and a lack of energy. Long-term insomnia can cause you to feel depressed or irritable; have trouble paying attention, learning, and remembering; and not do your best on the job or at school. Insomnia also can limit the energy you have to spend with friends or family. Insomnia can be mild to severe depending on how often it occurs and for how long. Chronic insomnia means having symptoms at least 3 nights per week for more than a month. Insomnia that lasts for less time is known as short-term or acute insomnia. Secondary insomnia often resolves or improves without treatment if you can eliminate its cause. This is especially true if the problem can be corrected soon after it starts. Better sleep habits and lifestyle changes often help relieve insomnia. You may need to see a doctor or sleep specialist to get the best relief for insomnia that is persistent or for which the cause of the sleep problem is unclear.
Asked in Insomnia

What is a good antidepressant for anxiety and insomnia?

User Avatar
Of course, you will need to talk to your doctor first but Lexapro is a good antidepressant.
Asked in Insomnia

How can you reduce insomnia?

User Avatar
== == Exercise, reducing stress, time to yourself, a dog to love, or a significant other who helps you feel better, eating healthy I had insomnia so badly one time that i almost went insane. It's a VERY long story, but I couldn't sleep for months, I was a vegetable. After trying every thing from herbs, to relaxation tapes, to warm baths, melatonin, Valerian root, biofeedback, you name it, none of it worked. I got on anti-depressants, and within a few weeks, I was almost myself. I was also prescribed xanax and I stayed on it (just at night) regularly for about 10 years. I just eased myself off of it (xanax) about six months ago, and I'm fine now. Still on Paxil, but you need to ask your doctor about it. So many things can cause insomnia. Mine was extreme. But I also exercise regularly, and TRY to eat healthy. You can't depend solely on pills, but if you work with your doctor, they (meds) can help you. Have you had a death in the family recently, or a divorce or a move? Those things can all hit you a few weeks, or even months later (as post-traumatic-stress-disorder) and manifest themselves in the form of insomnia. See a doctor. First the most important thing is insomnia is caused by stress if we reduces stress than we can reduces insomnia . # Try a short 20-minute nap on your lunch break, or simply lie under a tree for 10 minutes a day and take a few deep and lasting breaths. # Exercise regularly to promote inner wellness, just make sure you exercise at least two hours before you go to bed or you will disrupt your sleep. # Meditate for five minutes daily, which can reduce your heart rate and help you feel calmer.
Asked in Insomnia

What are the specific causes of insomnia?

User Avatar
Answer First, and most important, a person suffering from insomnia should get to a doctor. There are many possible causes, and you want to rule out all the medical ones first. I am a clinical social worker and not a physician. Here are a few things that could interfere with sleep: Apnea. Ask your sleeping partner if you're not sure. If you suffer from it, your partner will know. This is the disorder where you stop breathing for a few moments, and then snore loud enough to remove the wallpaper. Apnea can be related to weight, and it can also be "essential", or neurologically caused. There are treatments, including CPAP (Continuous Positive Air Pressure Pump). Alcohol. Part of the misuse of alcohol can be the mistaken idea that it helps induce sleep. It doesn't, at least not in the long term. Anyone who has struggled with this addiction will tell you about the many destructive consequences of alcohol. Incidentally, if I wanted to create depression in people, I'd give them alcohol. Mental health issues. Depression and other mental health conditions can cause or co-exist with insomnia. The different patterns of broken sleep can indicate the kind of issue being dealt with. For example, some people can fall asleep quickly, but wake very early and cannot return to sleep. Others remain awake for most of the night and might get short periods of fitful sleep at daybreak or during the day. Irregular bed times, or working alternating shifts. Your body does get used to a rhythm (or tries to) and if you attempt quick or frequent changes, you will run into trouble. A television in the bedroom. No, no, no. It doesn't help you sleep. The bedroom is for two of life's special activities--- and TV isn't one of them. Bad mattress. You know if you have one. Make a change, especially if you're getting those strange aches you never had before. Eating late. Food increases blood sugar, and blood sugar tells the brain "It's time to be awake!" Caffeine late in the day, or throughout the day. Insist all you want that it doesn't bother you. Yes, yes it does. Even if you "sleep", caffeine will disrupt the natural sleep rhythms that help to make sleep restorative. Bright light (PARTICULARLY) those full-spectrum lights, late in the day. These lights are wonderful, and when used properly they can have a very positive effect on mood, especially for people who suffer from Seasonal-Affective-Disorder (SAD). But they must be used with great care. Used late in the day, they have the effect of re-setting your circadian clock. This can be corrected, but why mess with it at all? Use these lights under the direction of a physician or knowledgeable professional. Napping during the day. I know, you can't sleep at night, so you have to sleep some time, right? Try to work through it, and avoid napping. Try these tips: Get good physical activity during the day. At least, get some natural sunlight on your face early in the day. (Don't stare at the sun, of course, but get some sun on you.) Have a regular bed time, and have a dark and reasonably cool bedroom. Make your bed; this does help to promote good sleep. Take a shower or warm soak before bed, but give your body about an hour to cool down before you get into bed. Cooling is a signal to the brain that "it's time to rest". Generally, if you are having trouble falling asleep remaining in bed is not a good idea. Get up and do something quiet and relatively non-stimulating until you feel drowsy enough to hop into bed. Remaining in bed only serves to associate 'being in bed' with 'struggling for sleep'.
Asked in Insomnia

Does vitamin b complex cause insomnia?

User Avatar
B6 definitely does for me. I can't take it, even in the morning, or I won't sleep at all that night.
Asked in Insomnia

What is the difference between insomnia and sleep apnea?

User Avatar
Insomnia is a sleep disorder in which you either have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that causes a person to stop breathing multiple times throughout the night night. Sleep apnea is typically recognized by extremely loud snoring.
Asked in Insomnia

Why does stuffy air cause insomnia?

User Avatar
A possible answer. When we sleep our aspirations become fewer per minute and shallower. If a person has some problem with their respiratory system the oxygen saturation in their blood begins to drop. At some point the body recognizes this as asphyxiation and awaken the sleeper same as in sleep apnea. When the individual awakes he?she can take deeper breaths more often restoring the oxygen saturation level to the blood stream.
Asked in Insomnia

Can celebrex cause insomnia?

User Avatar
I have been taking Celebrex to control pain and swelling after knee replacement surgery. I have noticed the following side effects: Insomnia Diarrhea Restlessness and confusion.
Asked in Insomnia

Is Insomnia a communicable disease?

User Avatar
No, its more of a psychological issue than a disease. It could be a symptom of a communicable disease, but in itself it is not contagious.
Asked in Insomnia

Why do people get insomnia?

User Avatar
Whilst stress is a big factor it is linked to a much larger problem in that people are not taking the necessary steps to prepare themselves for a good nights sleep. For example, a lot of people watch TV right up until going to bed which keeps the mind active, and causes more problems when trying to fall asleep. I would recommend that people take time out to really look hard at what they do when leading up to sleep, especially what I call the pre-sleep routine. Also, take a look at their environment for sleep to see what can be done to improve this. Examples of some tips from tiphub.com's page include: - Keeping your bedroom for sleeping, not working or living from. - Reducing ambient lighting in your dwelling during evenings. - Choosing the right type of snack before sleep to help you fall asleep (interesting one on Turkey actually). - Using White Noise to invoke sleep. Answer Stress is a big factor. Also, past experiences can cause insomnia. If a person was abused as a child or other related issues, later in life the person may get an "unconscious fear" of that happening again.
Asked in Insomnia

Can alcohol cause insomnia?

User Avatar
Yes it can because you can be up for hours drinking and not sleeping a wink but other alcohols can make you fall asleep. Yes if taken in excessive alcohol can cause you insomnia
Asked in Insomnia

What herbal remedy is used to treat insomnia?

User Avatar
* Valerian (Valeriana officinalis, Valerianaceae) is the herbal remedy most often first tried for insomnia. * There are several other herbs too that can be tried to treat the sleeping disorder of insomnia. Our nature has endowed has with numerous and effective herbs that can be a great help in treating insomnia. We have lemon balm that if taken in higher quantity in will boost sleep. Next is the chamomile that has some active ingredients that will help cool the mind and also promote sleep. We also have skullcap that is excellent mild relaxant. These are just some of the herbal that can help cure insomnia disorder. If we have to dig in we can find lots of herbal plants around the world.
Asked in Insomnia

Is reading in bed lying on your back a good cure for insomnia or does it just ruin your eyesight?

User Avatar
Any damage to your eyesight depends on the light you have and the distance you are holding the book, not your position in bed. The reading as far as it is calming and not an upsetting subject, is what helps to fall asleep, not the position.
Asked in Insomnia

What is a good home remedy for insomnia?

User Avatar
A milky drink it is a cheap and natural way