Metamorphic Rock

Metamorphic rocks are formed from other types of rocks. The original rock is exposed to conditions such as heat or pressure. Carbon turning to diamonds while under extreme pressure is an example of a metamorphic rock.

2,743 Questions
Metamorphic Rock

Is lava a metamorphic rock?

No. Lava is magma that has reached the surface. It isn't even technically a rock until it has cooled, and when it does, it is extrusive igneous rock.

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Metamorphic Rock

Is granite organic rock?

Granite is commonly classified as an igneous rock, one that was formed from cooling magma below the surface of the earth (intrusive). Igneous rock formed from lava erupted at the earth's surface like basalt are called extrusive.

Neither of these rocks would be called organic as they were not formed from things that were once alive. Coal could be called organic as it was formed originally from plant material.

Chemistry is typically divided into Organic and Inorganic and in this sense, Organic refers to reactions involving the element Carbon.

Organic is a term also used in connection with food, where it is generally used to refer to food grown or produced without use of pesticides or artificial fertilisers

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Metamorphic Rock

What is metamorphic rock used for?

Following are examples of three metamorphic rocks and a list of their uses.

Marble is a metamorphic rock that is used to make floor tiles, counter tops and it is carved into statues and was used extensively in the building of the Roman Colosseum and other historic buildings.

Slate is another metamorphic rock that is used in buildings for floor and roofing tiles, and it was once used for blackboards.

Quartzite is used as a source of silica; other forms of metamorphic rocks are useful as building components, monuments, counter tops, and facings.

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What are the three main types of rocks and their definitions?

Rocks are categorized into three distinct types based on their method of formation. The three types are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. Early in Earth's history, all rock was igneous, having formed from the cooling of melt on the surface.

An igneous rock is simply a rock that has solidified from magma or lava upon cooling. Igneous rocks can be intrusive (solidified from magma underground) or extrusive (solidified from lava at or near the surface). The bulk of Earth's crust is formed from igneous rock. Examples of igneous rock include basalt, obsidian, rhyolite, granite, diorite, gabbro, and pumice.

A sedimentary rock is one that is formed by the accumulation of small to large sediment particles derived from all three types of rock and in some cases organic material, and undergoes compaction, cementation, or evaporation from/precipitation from a saturated mineral solution. Sedimentary rock is classified as organic, (derived from organisms), clastic (formed from any size particle of preexisting rock), or non-clastic (also referred to as chemical), where the sedimentary rock is formed from the evaporation of a solution that is saturated with mineral compounds. Examples of organic sedimentary rocks are coal and limestone. Examples of clastic sedimentary rocks are conglomerate and shale. Examples of non-clastic or chemical sedimentary rocks are rock gypsum and rock salt.

A metamorphic rock is an igneous, sedimentary, or another metamorphic rock that has either been squeezed by incredible pressures deep underground and/or has been exposed to very high temperatures, altering its structure, mineral alignment, or chemical composition. Metamorphic rocks are classified as contact (from proximity to a magmatic intrusion) or regional (resulting from deep burial and pressures from plate collisions Metamorphic rock is also classified as foliated or non-foliated, foliation being the parallel alignment of the constituent minerals in bands that are perpendicular to the applied pressure. Metamorphic rocks can also be described by the grade of metamorphism which has taken place from low to high, high being the closest to the next stage in the rock cycle, melting. Examples of metamorphic rock are slate, quartzite, marble, phyllite, schist, and gneiss..

The three major types of rocks are sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous.

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Metamorphic Rock

What are metamorphic rocks used for?

Following are examples of three metamorphic rocks and a list of their uses.

Marble is a metamorphic rock that is used to make floor tiles, counter tops and it is carved into statues and was used extensively in the building of the Roman Colosseum and other historic buildings.

Slate is another metamorphic rock that is used in buildings for floor and roofing tiles, and it was once used for blackboards.

Quartzite is used as a source of silica; other forms of metamorphic rocks are useful as building components, monuments, counter tops, and facings.

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Lalu Prasad Yadav
Rocks and Minerals
Metamorphic Rock

How does metamorphic rock change to sedimentary rock and then to igneous rock?

Metamorphic rock must first turn into sediment through uplift, weathering, erosion and deposition before the sediments can undergo lithification and become sedimentary rock. Further compaction, pressure, and heat can turn it into metamorphic rock. In order to change into igneous rock it would need to be buried so deep in the earth that the heat partially melts the metamorphic rock forming magma. Then the magma would need to ascend, cool, and undergo recrystallization to form igneous rock.

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Metamorphic Rock

How are rocks formed or made?

Rocks can lithify from sediments, solidify from melt, precipitate out of saturated solutions, or metamorphose from other rock types. The first rocks on Earth were igneous rocks, formed from the cooling of molten material on the surface.

Rocks are categorized into three distinct types based on their method of formation. The three types are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic.

An igneous rock is simply a rock that has solidified from magma or lava upon cooling. Igneous rocks can be intrusive (solidified from magma underground) or extrusive (solidified from lava at or near the surface). The bulk of Earth's crust is formed from igneous rock. Examples of igneous rock include basalt, obsidian, rhyolite, granite, diorite, gabbro, and pumice.

A sedimentary rock is one that is formed by the accumulation of small to large sediment particles derived from all three types of rock and in some cases organic material, and undergoes compaction, cementation, or evaporation from/precipitation from a saturated mineral solution. Sedimentary rock is classified as organic, (derived from organisms), clastic (formed from any size particle of preexisting rock), or non-clastic (also referred to as chemical), where the sedimentary rock is formed from the evaporation of a solution that is saturated with mineral compounds. Examples of organic sedimentary rocks are coal and limestone. Examples of clastic sedimentary rocks are conglomerate and shale. Examples of non-clastic or chemical sedimentary rocks are rock gypsum and rock salt.

A metamorphic rock is an igneous, sedimentary, or another metamorphic rock that has either been squeezed by incredible pressures deep underground and/or has been exposed to very high temperatures, altering its structure, mineral alignment, or chemical composition. Metamorphic rocks are classified as contact (from proximity to a magmatic intrusion) or regional (resulting from deep burial and pressures from plate collisions Metamorphic rock is also classified as foliated or non-foliated, foliation being the parallel alignment of the constituent minerals in bands that are perpendicular to the applied pressure. Metamorphic rocks can also be described by the grade of metamorphism which has taken place from low to high, high being the closest to the next stage in the rock cycle, melting. Examples of metamorphic rock are slate, quartzite, marble, phyllite, schist, and gneiss.

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Why do metamorphic rocks often contain fossils?

Metamorphic rocks don't contain fossils. You may find a few distorted fossils in slate but these are only there because some slates are not very highly metamorphosed.

Fossils are found in sedimentary rocks that have not metamorphosed.

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What is a metamorphic rock made of?

Minerals. Metamorphic minerals like sillimanite, kyanite, staurolite, andalusite, and garnet, and non-metamorphic minerals like olivines, pyroxenes, amphiboles, micas, feldspars, and quartz.

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What is the protolith for greenstone?

diarreah

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Metamorphic Rock

How does metamorphic rock become sedimentary rock?

Through weathering and erosion of the metamorphic rock. The metamorphic rock, exposed to weathering processes at the surface, breaks into smaller pieces. Erosional processes transport these pieces to a place of deposition where they build up, layer on layer. Eventually the compaction caused by the weight of the sediments above reduces the amount of space and water between particles. In this process of rock formation known as lithification, cementing minerals are formed out of the slowly disappearing fluids, which are saturated with mineral components. Once cemented together, it is now considered sedimentary rock.

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What are some examples of metamorphic rocks?

Examples of metamorphic rock include:

  • Slate
  • Gneiss
  • Skarn
  • Phyllite
  • Amphibolite
  • Schist
  • Quartzite
  • Marble
  • Granulite
  • Blueschist
  • Suevite
  • Eclogite
  • Serpentinite
  • Gossan
  • Psammite
  • Pelite
  • Greenschist
  • Migmatite
  • Mylonite
  • Hornfels
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Similarities between sedimentary and Metamorphic rocks?

They are both rocks.

Sedimentary can contain metamorphic rocks.

and vice versa.

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Flooring
Metamorphic Rock

What is the best tile and grout cleaner?

Answer

i accidently poured some "mr. clean" on my tile floor and left it there becaue i was in a hurry, i came back later to get it up and the grout was like new. i thought the grount was brown, when i moved into the house i didn't know the true color. turns out, it was a light tan, not dark brown. they didn't put sealer on the grout.

Tilex, there are some acids always test a small area first.

There is a product from Australia called Pink Stuff it is a broom on mop off grout and tile cleaner, no nasties. www.pinkstuff.com.au

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Metamorphic Rock

What are the characteristics of metamorphic rock?

Metamorphic rocks may display foliation, which is the layering, banding, or platiness that is associated with the rearrangement of mineral crystals due to directional pressure. Examples of foliated metamorphic rock include schist, slate, and gneiss.

Some minerals are typically formed due to the metamorphism of existing rock, and include those minerals that form due to the loss of water. When minerals that contain water can no longer exist due to heat and pressure, new minerals form. Garnet is a non-hydrous mineral that is often associated with metamorphic rock.

Metamorphism in rock can also manifest itself by the replacement of existing minerals by other minerals due to the invasion of the host rock by heated fluids which are created by a nearby magmatic intrusion.

Metamorphic rocks can also display a recrystallization and interlocking crystalline structure that is common when limestone or dolostone is metamorphosed into marble, or sandstone is metamorphosed into quartzite.

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Metamorphic Rock

Is calcareous tufa a metamorphic rock?

no its a sedimentary rock

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Metamorphic Rock

What is the difference between sedimentary and metamorphic rocks?

Geologists categorize rocks into three basic groups, of which sedimentary and metamorphic are two. Igneous is the third. Sedimentary rocks are laid down in layers of sediments such as mud, silt and sand that accumulate and harden over time. Igneous rocks are formed from the solidification of lava or magma. Metamorphic rocks are a bit of a combination. They are sedimentary rocks or igneous rocks that have been deformed and changed by high pressure and temperature deep in Earth, or by contact with, or close proximity to a magmatic intrusion.

A simple diagram showing the rock cycle with the processes that link sedimentary and metamorphic rocks as well as a simple diagram showing how metamorphic rocks are named and the rock types from which they are formed as well as A glossary of geological terms is also available. Please see the related links section.

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Metamorphic Rock

What is the definition of a metamorphic rock?

A metamorphic rock is an igneous, sedimentary, or another metamorphic rock that has been: 1) squeezed by incredible pressures deep underground, 2) has been exposed to very hot fluids, 3) has been exposed to very high temperatures without melt occurring, 4) combinations of numbers 1-3. Rock exposed to these conditions can be metamorphosed, altering its structure, mineral alignment, and possibly its chemistry.

Examples are slate, schist, anthracite, metaconglomerate, and gneiss.

a metamorphic rock is a rock that has changed because of intense heat or pressure.rock altered by pressure and heat.
A metamorphic rock is one that has been significantly changed from its original condition. At least by heating due to re-burial, and sometimes by being completely re-melted before subsequent crystallization. In either process, some of the original minerals have become mobilized to create new minerals. During intense metamorphism, the original layering of the rock will be destroyed.

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How does igneous rock become metamorphic rock?

Igneous rocks, such as granite, when subjected to extreme pressure and temperature will change to metamorphic rock. Evidence that an igneous rock had undergone metamorphism would include light and dark mineral banding; possibly with indications of partial melting in highly metamorphosed samples.

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Metamorphic Rock

What are foliated and non-foliated rocks?

Foliation is a geologic term that is used to describe the appearance of metamorphic rocks. Foliated metamorphic rocks such as gneiss display banding and regrouping of its mineral constituents as a result of enormous pressures and heat. The banding forms perpendicularly to the direction of pressure. The pressure is usually related to tectonic plate collisions. Schist is another type of foliated rock that exhibits thin layering of micaceous minerals, once again due to pressure and heat. The difference between these two types of foliated rock lies in the rock from which they were derived. Non-foliated metamorphic rocks such as quartzite and marble do not display the banding or layering that are present in foliated rocks. This is because their parent rock was usually sedimentary and more pure in mineral composition than the parent rocks of foliated rocks.
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Metamorphic Rock

How does sedimentary rock become metamorphic rock?

Sedimentary rock becomes metamorphic rock through the addition of heat and/or pressure. Contact metamorphic rocks are those primarily transformed by close proximity to an intrusion of magma, where a recrystallization or elemental transfer can take place. Sedimentary rocks like shale can metamorphose into slate mainly through pressure and heat derived from plate collision, where the alignment of minerals is changed resulting in a foliated texture.

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Where an under what conditions are metamorphic rocks formed?

inside earth

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Name three metamorphic rocks?

marble, limestone and quartz (was limestone but had more heat and pressure and became crystaline)

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Metamorphic Rock

What places are metamorphic rocks found?

Metamorphic rock really is found deep underground, at the base of mountains, in zones radiating from intrusions of magma underground, on glaciated terrain after transportation by ice, or on the surface of eroded mountains.

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Metamorphic Rock

Where are metamorphic rocks found?

Everywhere at some depth, and on the surface where uplift and erosion have allowed them to be visible. They can also be found as pebbles or boulders in glacial drift, deposited in areas in which they do not normally appear.

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