Seasons

Seasons are the change in the climate which are usually constant over a period of time. This category contains information on all the different seasons.

Asked in Snow and Ice, Rain and Flooding, Seasons, Oil and Petroleum

Why road become slippery in rainy season?

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The rain loosens the built up oil making a very slippery salad-dressing like mixture of oil and water.
Asked in Seasons

When does the spring start in Brazil?

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In 2011, spring started on September 23rd. Hope that helps!
Asked in Seasons

Who is Tyler winters?

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An upcoming actor and Internet personality. Stay Tuned
Asked in Food & Cooking, Seasons

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the summer season?

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You can get lots of lovely produce which you cannot get in other seasons - or at least it will be fresh! it is hott.. lovellyy.. eat salad and get a tan! x
Asked in Physics, Seasons

When was spring in 2011?

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First Day of Spring was on March 20, 2011 and the last day of Spring was on June 20, 2011. Astronomical spring in the Northern Hemisphere as defined by the International Astronomical Union begins with the Vernal Equinox on March 20, 2011, at 7:21 p.m. EDT. At the start of spring (spring equinox), day and night are approximately 12 hours long (at the equatorial plane) and the Sun is at the midpoint of the sky. Our north pole tilts towards the Sun. NOTE-"the north pole tilts toward the sun." that is true on summer solstice, but in December the south pole tilts toward the sun. At the equinoxes the tilt is parallel to the sun. First day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere In general, the four seasons correspond to the relative position of the sun to the earth. Astronomical determination of spring is calculated according to when the sun passes through the equatorial plane. When going from winter to spring, the sun is moving north; as soon as the sun crosses the equator, we call it spring. (This applies to places north of the equator.) First day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere The "official" date of spring south of the equator (official is corresponding to the first day of fall in places north of the equator) would be around September 20/21, depending on when the sun crosses the equator. Countries such as Australia and New Zealand, however, designate the first day of September as the official first day of spring (climatological counterpart). Preference between these two methods varies across Europe. Many east Asian countries use lunar dates to determine the beginning of spring. In Addition The climatological spring as defined by the World Meteorological Organization began on March 1, 2011. The ecological spring begins locally with the beginning of the growing season. Usually in temperate climates when the mean daily temperature reaches 6 degrees C/42 degrees F. This can be as early as February in mild climates. and as late as April or May in cool climates. Spring starts on March 21st .
Asked in Astronomy, Seasons

How do rotation and revolution affect earth?

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Rotation gives us our days. We have daylight and night. Rotation is involved in the daily cycle of the tides. Also, rotation affects wind directions due to the Coriolis effect. Revolution around the Sun gives us our years. The combination of the Earth's tilted axis and Earth's revolution around the Sun gives us the seasons.
Asked in Home Equity and Refinancing, India, Seasons

How many seasons are there in India?

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'Season' is called 'Ritu' in India and according to traditional Indian calendar there are six ritus (Indian seasons)-- 1. Vasant (spring), 2. Grishm (summer), 3. Varsha (monsoon), 4. Sharad (autumn), 5. Hemanat (winter) and 6. Shishir (winter and fall).
Asked in Seasons

When is the official start of Spring 2010?

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Saturday, March 20 In the US and Canada: Saturday, March 20, at approximately midnight is the official first day of spring for 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere (Vernal Equinox). On that day, the Southern Hemisphere observes the Autumnal Equinox, which is the equivalent of the start of Autumn. First day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere In general, the four seasons correspond to the relative position of the sun to the earth. Meteorological determination of spring is calculated according to when the sun passes through the equatorial plane. When going from winter to spring, the sun is moving north; as soon as the sun crosses the equator, we call it spring. (This applies to places north of the equator.) First day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere "Spring" - a time of melting and new growth - occurs about September-November in places south of the equator, e.g., Australia, New Zealand, Africa, Brazil). Countries such as Australia and New Zealand, however, designate the first day of September as the official first day of spring. The official date of spring south of the equator (corresponding to the first official day of fall in places north of the equator) would be around September 20/21, depending on when the sun crosses the equator. Background information regarding the seasons: Spring comes in between the 19th to the 23rd of March and at different times. It changes on a yearly basis because the first official day of spring is the (Spring) Vernal Equinox. This is when the sun is directly above the equator. It rises due East and sets due West and does not do so on the exact same day every year; this is because the calendar is not exactly 365 precise days every single year. In 2009, spring arrived on March 20; the sun was above the equator, and crossed to the Northern Hemisphere at approximately 11:47 p.m.
Asked in Seasons

How nature changes her garments from summer to rainy season?

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hiw nature changes her garments from summer to rainy season
Asked in Meteorology and Weather, Seasons

When do you go to the toilet to expel urine more often - during warm or cold weather?

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During cold weather. During warm weather, the body perspirates (sweats) to maintain body temperature and hence a lot of fluids are lost. so, the amount of fluids the body has to expel via urine is lesser. However, during cold weather, there is no perspiration and hence the amount of fluids the body expels via urine is higher than during warm weather.
Asked in Astronomy, Seasons, The Moon

Is the shadow cast by the sun longer in the summer or winter in Alaska?

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In any one place, every object has a longer shadow in winter than it has in summer. That fact is an important clue to the reasons for winter and summer.
Asked in Rain and Flooding, Seasons, Peacocks and Peahens

Why the Peacock opening its feather during rainy season?

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Because peacock wanna dance in rainy mood............ jp (mamce)
Asked in Seasons

What date does winter begin?

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Winter officially starts in the Northern Hemisphere on December 21. Winter officially starts in the Southern Hemisphere on June 21.
Asked in Brakes and Tires, Flats and Tire Pressure, Seasons

Do you need summer tires?

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Summer Tires I drove all summer on my winter tires and the only things that came of it were louder than normal road noise, and tread-wear. Both winter and summer tires will last you longer if you change them every season. If money is an issue, get all season. You don't NEED summer tires. all-season tires would probably do fine for you. Winter tires will be louder on dry roads and will wear fast, so you should not drive on them year-round. Summer tires usually have a performance advantage on dry roads over winter and all-season tires, but should not be driven in more than a dusting of snow, and forget about it on ice (I discovered this when it finally snowed here in NC; my current car came with summer tires). All-season, of course, offer a balance of traction in all conditions. I drove in upstate NY winters for several years on all-season tires without much problem, so unless you frequently drive on unplowed roads with more than a couple inches of snow/ice, you can get by with all-season tires year round. Winter tires use different compounds. When they are new they are very soft and grip well on ice and snow but as they wear down to about halfway, the compound changes to an all season compound which is harder. Once snow tires are half worn, they are about the same as regular all season tires so you might as well run them. Snow tires are only good on snow for one or two seasons. wow now this is a question . I am from Canada . so hmm alot of snow and a few good months of hot sun . All-season tires seems of been a thing to have for many years here . but now its changing , people want better traction in the winter . and with a two year old all season tire , it just dont cut it any more the swipes in the tire are not as deep anymore . put it this . do you want to stay on the road and kick the snow out from under the tires or would you want them to ride on top like a snow shoe ? . During the summer you want a good rain tire to hmmm , almost do the same thing with the water . The biggest money maker from the tire company's is miss leading the people thinking that a n all season tire can do the job , but as the tire wears down the the all season factor goes out the window in a 20% tread wear .wish i lived where there was no snow. Ans 5 I'm from Canada too, and agree totally with my countryman above. You DO need summer tires as they deal with rain much better than winter tires do. (And we get lots of unexpected rain in summer.) -Most sensible Canadians keep two complete sets of rims, one with summer and one set with winter tires. Most GOOD snow tires cost more than summer tires, so it's silly to waste them with dry road use. All Season tires are OK, but not as good as the two set option
Asked in Seasons

What some example of mass?

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Everything that exists and takes up space has mass. Everything you can see is an example of an object with mass.
Asked in Australia, Seasons

How hot is it in Australia in Fahrenheit?

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It really does depend on where you are in Australia, and at what time of year. It can be baking in the outback sunshine 100+ degrees Fahrenheit, though in the tropics it can be as humid as Thailand, and in the south in the wintertime the Australians have snowboarding and skiing competitions. Australia is a huge and incredibly diverse nation, but just remember with it been in the southern hemisphere the seasons are reversed to the seasons of the northern hemisphere, meaning they have barbecues on the beach at Christmas, and build snowmen in Victoria in July. In short if you're going anywhere in the summertime expect, very hot, 100+ degrees Fahrenheit. (The Australians don't use Fahrenheit by the way, neither does much of the rest of the civilised world, centigrade is the ticket.) Though wintertime trip to Melbourne, will have you reaching for your scarf and umbrella.
Asked in Astronomy, Seasons

What effect does earth's tilt have?

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The planet's seasons are the main result of the tilt. The axis of the Earth's rotation is tilted at an angle of 23.44 degrees to the plane of the eclliptic, which is the plane of the Earth's orbit around the Sun. (We don't really know "why". It may have been caused by an impact event very early in Earth's history, which is believed to have created the Moon.) As a result of the Earth being tilted over as it spins and orbits the Sun, the Sun appears to move north and south over the course of the year. This causes the seasons. Ozone loss (referred to as the hole) is also directly connected to this tilt as far as location and size. The tilt prevents the sun from hitting a small portion of this layer and without the sun, ozone can not exist. When the sun again hits the layer, the hole disappears again. Both the size and location are caused by this tilt. Seasons, mostly. The way the earth tilts affects the amount of sun received at different places throughout the year. The category says it all: Seasons! Another effect: Changes in daylight hours throughout the year. The further a planet's axis is tilted, the more dramatic the seasons are. Vice verse for less axis tilting. For example, consider the Earth if it were 0deg. Everywhere on Earth would have 12 hours of daylight. The polar regions would be really cold all the time and the Equator would be much hotter. But, there'd be no temperature changing seasons. Consider 90deg now: In Summer, the North Pole would get sunlight around the clock and at the Solstice, it would be directly above. Everything would melt and become very warm. In Winter, parts of the northern hemisphere would never see light at all, and become much colder. The changes in seasons would be very dramatic. The Earth's tilt produces seasons, and the varying amounts of daylight in different seasons at latitudes away from the equator. The Earth's tilt produces seasons, and the varying amounts of daylight in different seasons at latitudes away from the equator. I presume you're talking about the Earth. It's because of its tilted axis that we have the various seasons.
Asked in Indianapolis Colts, Seasons

When is senior prank season?

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Maybe senior year or near end of it
Asked in Astronomy, Earth Sciences, Seasons

What caused Earth to tilt on its axis?

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What caused this obliquity (axial tilt) is still not clearly understood - and probably never will be. During the early periods of the Earths formation, slight differences in the distribution of matter may well have caused irregularities in the balance of the planet, but this is unlikely to have caused such a large tilt. The most likely explanation, is that early in the formation of the Earth, it was struck by a rogue planet - called Theia. (About the size of Mars). It struck, at an angle of about 45 degrees, (Debris from this collision made the Moon). This collision would almost certainly have pushed its obliquity (axial tilt) away from almost near vertical. We only have to look at Mercury and Venus to see that their tilt is almost near to vertical, It also seems, that the Moon also keeps the Earths tilt fairly constant. Without the Moon, the tilt would alter quite considerably over time. See related link for more information.

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