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Basically, when a land-based plant is water-logged, the roots begin to rot, thus killing the plant. The root system of a plant is just like a "brain" and without it functioning the plant simply can't survive. Some plants need to be in a "well-drained" position. This is because there are some plants which rot quickly and they need to be drier around the root system.

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15y ago
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13y ago

excess water forces air and oxygen out of the pore spaces in the soil, without oxygen the roots first start to deteriorate, then die; once they are damaged the entire plant starts to suffer (through wilt) as the damaged system is not able to absorb water for the plant

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12y ago

in a water logged soil, the micro organisms can not respire aerobically, therefore the undergo anaerobic respiration which make the soil acidic, the high acidic content of the soil leads to an increase in the decomposition of the plants roots which lead to the death of the plants.

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13y ago

Too much water can drown plants by preventing oxygen to get to the roots.

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10y ago

Because in the waterlogging condition roots are not able to respire for want of oxygen, which is otherwise available from the soil if not waterlogged.

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11y ago

Due to excess of water......i think so

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12y ago

cos ur vile hew

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Q: Why do land plants die in water logged soil?
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