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How was the length of a meter redefined in the year 1983?

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On October 20, 1983, the meter was officially redefined as the distance traveled by light in a vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.

Light travels at 299792.458 km/sec, so the period was chosen as 0.00000000335641 second, or 3.35641 x 10-9 second.

The original definitions (1799 and 1899) depended on a measured standard bar. In 1960, it was redefined as a relationship to the wavelength of light from ions of the element krypton. In 1980, the standard was based on the unusually cohesive wavelength of an iodine-stabilized helium-neon laser.
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How was the length of a standard meter redefined in 1983?

Originally, a metre was defined as 1/10,000,000th of the distance from the Earth's equator to the North pole. Since 1983 it has been defined as:the length of the path travelle

In 1983 what changed about the length of the meter?

Answer     The French were the first to define the length of a meter by using a alluminium/platinum alloy bar of a meter length at 25 degrees Celcius. This however is

How was the length of a standrad meter redefined in the year 1983?

On October 20, the meter was redefined again. The definition states that the meter is the length of the path traveled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,4