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Answered 2010-03-01 23:36:33

No. The life insurance proceeds pass outside of the parent's will.

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insurance proceeds are distributed to named beneficiaries In addition an insurance policy of a deceased that does not have a named beneficiary will be included in the probate procedure and the state's probate law of succession will apply.


No. Life Insurance proceeds to beneficiaries are not taxable.


No. That person has no authority to claim any propertythat belongs to the children unless they have a court order to that effect. If they take any money left to the children, any Social Security benefits or any insurance proceeds that name the children as beneficiaries they can be prosecuted.No. That person has no authority to claim any property that belongs to the children unless they have a court order to that effect. If they take any money left to the children, any Social Security benefits or any insurance proceeds that name the children as beneficiaries they can be prosecuted.No. That person has no authority to claim any property that belongs to the children unless they have a court order to that effect. If they take any money left to the children, any Social Security benefits or any insurance proceeds that name the children as beneficiaries they can be prosecuted.No. That person has no authority to claim any property that belongs to the children unless they have a court order to that effect. If they take any money left to the children, any Social Security benefits or any insurance proceeds that name the children as beneficiaries they can be prosecuted.


The proceeds of a life insurance policy are paid directly to the beneficiaries without going into the estate of the person. The only way that life insurance proceeds become part of an estate is if the the beneficiary is listed as "Estate of the Insured". In this case any expenses of the estate are to be paid out before the heirs receive a share. If there are beneficiaries on the policy, the life insurance company will pay the beneficiaries directly.


Essentially what you need to do is to designate your grandchildren as "contingent beneficiaries" of the insurance policy. Assuming that your child(ren) is now the only person(s) designated as the beneficiary(ies), you would need to contact the agent who sold you the policy, or the insurer itself, and request the proper form by which to add the contingent beneficiary. You would then return the completed and signed document to the agent or the insurer, as directed. A potential complication exists if your grandchildren are minors at the time of your death and your children have predeceased you. The problem is that the insurer will generally be unwilling to pay the proceeds directly to a minor, even if he/she/they are the designated contingent beneficiaries. Therefore, you should think through whom you wish to designate the recipient of the proceeds on behalf of the minors and designate that person/persons/institution as the recipient of the policy proceeds. You can also consider the establishment of a trust to serve that purpose, but you will want to get legal advice to do that.


No. Death proceeds are received income tax free by beneficiaries.


No. As in all states, life insurance proceeds avoid probate and flow directly to named beneficiaries.


The answer to the question of whether or not beneficiaries have to pay taxes on the money received from life insurance policies is: no they will not have to.


A certificate of marriage is not required to collect on life insurance. Life insurance proceeds will be paid only to the named beneficiary/beneficiaries on the policy. If all beneficiaries are deceased, then the benefit will be paid to the deceased insured's estate.


Yes, even if incarcerated, you will still receive proceeds from a life insurance policy if you are the valid recipient. They will not be able to receive the proceeds if they were the cause of the insured's death.


They split it evenly unless the insurance policy specifies that the proceeds are to be divided among several beneficiaries in some other way. Sometimes a policy can be payable to a spouse and children, with the spouse getting one size share and the children dividing the rest among themselves. The owner of the policy has the right to specify who gets how much.


It depends. Life insurance proceeds are not subject to income taxes to the beneficiaries, at all. However, if the policy is owned by the deceased person, then those proceeds can become part of the estate and be taxed in that manner. If you want to avoid taxation, completely, make sure that the owner and beneficiaries are different than the subject of insurance. Hope this helps! MyInsuranceXpert


It is a type of life insurance policy beneficiary designation in which the life insurance benefits are divided among a class of beneficiaries, typically the children of the insured. Best explanation is an example: An insured has two children, and each of those children have two kids. If his children are listed as equal primary beneficiaries, they split the proceeds 50/50. However, if one child predeceases the insured, the surviving child received 100% of the proceeds. If the bene designation is the insured's children per stirpes, they still split the proceeds 50/50 if both alive when the insured dies. However, if one child predeceases the insured, the surviving child only receives 50% of the proceeds and the children of the deceased child will each get 25%, splitting the 50% that was designated for their deceased parent.


When a person insured by a life insurance policy dies during the term of the policy the proceeds are paid to the beneficiary or beneficiaries. Life insurance death benefit proceeds are usually not subject to state and federal income taxation. But, if there is no beneficiary, the death benefit proceeds of the life insurance policy may be included in the estate of the deceased. Then, it may be subject to state, federal and inheritance taxes.


Life insurance is a complex issue in community property states. Even if your husband has named beneficiaries, you may be entitled to an interest in the proceeds. See the link provided below for a very informative publication that you can read in its entirety. There is a section regarding beneficiaries other than the spouse.


Get StartedInsurance proceeds on the life of a


Whether or not a surviving spouse is entitiled to any life insurance proceeds DEPENDS on the fact that most, if not all, policies must be paid to the named beneficiaries in the insurance policy records.


The insurance company must be notified of the insured's death, preferably by a beneficiary, policy owner, or an insurance agent, at which point it will send out packages of paperwork to all beneficiaries on file for that insurance policy. The paperwork is filled out by each beneficiary and returned to the insurance company, along with a certified copy of a death certificate, at which time the insurance company processes the paperwork, verfies the eligibility of the claim, and then, if appropriate, pays out the proceeds of the insurance policy.


If the life insurance policy designates that payment is to be made to a beneficiary other than the deceased or to his/her estate, the proceeds pass outside of the estate and do not become an asset of it. Instead, all other things being equal, proceeds are payable to named beneficiaries. Note, though, that in order to collect, the beneficiaries must file a proof of claim and otherwise provide documentation that the insurer requires (such as a death certificate).


Generally, no. Life insurance proceeds are paid directly to the beneficiary of the policy, if that person is living at the time of the insured's death. If a contingent beneficiary is named, the proceeds are paid to him/her. If the policy specifies that the proceeds are to be paid to the estate of the insured, or if none of the named beneficiaries are living upon the insured's death, proceeds will be paid to the estate. In that event, they become part of the Estate. If the law of the State in which the insured died requires a probate proceeding (usually depending upon the size of the estate), the life insurance proceeds would pass through the estate.


Generally, if a life insurance company is notified of the death of the insured and there are named beneficiaries, the company pays off upon official notification of the death. You should speak with a customer service representative at the insurance company who can review your situation and advise you how to obtain your share of the proceeds.


The beneficiary designated on the policy application is the recipient. Usually, a secondary ("contingent") beneficiary is also named in the event that the primary beneficiary dies before the insured. The estate of the deceased can also be the beneficiary if it is named as such or if there are no named beneficiaries or if all of them die before the insured. In that event, the insurance proceeds become a part of the estate and are distributed according to the insured's Last Will and Testament. If the insured dies without a Will, the estate, including the insurance proceeds, pass according to state law according to the laws of intestate succession.


In order to receive life insurance death benefit money, you must be named as a beneficiary in the life insurance policy with some exceptions. Some exceptions to this may be: All the named beneficiaries are not living. In this case, the life insurance benefit would become part of the estate and be paid out according to the will or trust. If the life insurance was payable to a Trust, then the Trust determines who receives the proceeds. If the insured party dies and there are no beneficiaries alive and there is no will or trust, then the state probate court would determine who gets the proceeds. Feel free to ask more. Brian Lombardo, CPA, Agent


A life insurance trust is an irrevocable, non-amendable trust which is both the owner and beneficiary of one or more life insurance policies. Upon the death of the insured, the trustee invests the insurance proceeds and administers the trust for one or more beneficiaries. (Moved from discussion comments below)


Proceeds are the payments of the benefit. So in other words with Life Insurance it is the death claim amount paid out.