US Coins

Are nickels from 1941 54 56 62 and 64 silver?

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2005-11-13 23:22:53
2005-11-13 23:22:53

Sorry, none of those contain any silver. The only years there are any silver in the nickels are during WWII -- 1942 to 1945 -- and they will be identified by a large "P", "D", or "S" above the dome of the building on the back of the coin. Current value for circulated silver nickels is about 20 cents apiece.

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The specific metallic composition of silver war nickels is 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese.


No. War nickels dated 1942-45 contain 35% silver, with 56% copper and 9% manganese.


U.S. nickels minted from 1866 until now have been made of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The only exception are the "war" nickels of 1942-45, which were 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese.


Special "war nickels" minted from late 1942 to 1945 are the only US nickels that contained silver. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. These coins are distinguished by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back. All other US nickels are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


No, because Liberty nickels don't contain any silver. Like nearly all US nickels, they're made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.The only American nickels that ever contained silver were special "war nickels" minted from late 1942 to 1945. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. They can be identified by a large mint mark letter (P, D, or S) over the dome of Monticello on the back.


Only nickel coins minted in 1942 through 1945 contained some silver, as the nickel was needed for the war effort. 56% copper, 35% silver and 9% manganese were used. All other nickels are 25% nickel and 75% copper.


The only US nickels that contained silver were "war nickels", minted from late 1942 to the end of 1945. They're distinguished by a large mint mark over the top of Monticello. They were minted in an alloy of 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese so that nickel metal could be used in the war effort. All other US nickels are made of 75% copper and 25% nickel.


Yes. Silver war nickels contain 1.75 gm of silver, so depending on current metal prices the can sell for 75¢ to $1 as scrap. Coins in better condition can be worth more as collectibles.War nickels were minted from late 1942 to 1945 in an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for military purposes. They're the only US nickels that ever contained silver; all other nickels regardless of date are made of an alloy of 75% copper and 25% nickel.


If you are asking about US coins the answer is no with the exception of the years of WW11. They are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper since they were first introduced. In 1942-45 they were made with 35% silver, 56% copper and 9% manganese. These nickels are generally worth more for their silver content of around $2.


The term Silver War Nickels refers to those produced by the United States Mint from mid-1942 to 1945. These nickels differ from those minted before and after World War II, as those were made from 56% copper, 35% Silver and 9% manganese.In WWII, The United States had to use 56% Copper, 35% Silver, and 9% Manganese. The dates for these 35% silver nickels are 1942(P,S) (NOT D), 1943(P,D,S), 1944(P,D,S), and 1945(P,D,S). The mint marks on these coins are located above the dome of Monticello.Contrary to popular misunderstanding, these are the only US nickels that ever contained silver. The rest are all made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


The only US nickels that ever contained silver were the famous "war nickels" minted during WWII when nickel was a strategic metal. War nickels are made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese. They are dated 1942 through 1945 and can be identified by a large mint mark letter (P, D, or S) over the dome of Monticello on the back.No Canadian nickels have ever contained silver.Silver 5-cent coinsBefore each country started minting nickel 5-cent coins, both the US and Canada used tiny silver 5-cent pieces. However they were never called "nickels".


Yes, 56 is greater than 54.


The only US nickels that ever contained silver were special "war nickels" minted from late 1942 to 1945. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. They can be identified by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back. All other US nickels dating back to the coin's introduction in 1866 are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


The only US nickels that ever contained silver were special "war nickels" minted from late 1942 to 1945. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. They can be identified by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back. All other US nickels dating back to the coin's introduction in 1866 are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


Special "war nickels" made from late 1942 to 1945 are the only US nickels that ever contained silver. All other US nickels are made of the same alloy, a mixture of 25% nickel and 75% copper. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. These coins are distinguished by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back.


The only US nickels that ever contained silver were special "war nickels" made from late 1942 to 1945. All US nickels from 1866 to the present are made of the same alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. These coins are distinguished by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back.


Silver "war nickels" weigh 5 grams, which is the same amount as the normal cupronickel coins minted all other years since 1866. War nickels were the only US nickels that ever contained silver. They were minted from mid-1942 to the end of 1945 to save nickel metal for use in the war effort. They were struck in an alloy of 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese.


It's a common misconception that pre-1964 US nickels were made of silver just like higher-denomination coins. In fact, the only US nickels that ever contained silver were special "war nickels" minted from late 1942 to 1945. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. They can be identified by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back. All other US nickels dating back to 1866 are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


Many people are confused by when US nickels contained silver. The only US nickels that contained any silver were special "war nickels" made from late 1942 to 1945. All other US nickels dating back to the coin's introduction in 1866 are made of the same alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. These coins are distinguished by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back.


There are 56 nickels in $2.80. 56 * 0.05 = 2.80 That's really an easy sum to do - I hope your teacher will explain to you how to do it.


The only US nickels that contained any silver were made from late 1942 through 1945. These "war nickels" were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. They can be identified by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back. All other US nickels regardless of date are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


Yes during World War 2. There was a shortage of nickel metal so nickels were made from an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese. The coins were called "war nickels"; they were struck from late 1942 through the end of 1945, and are easily identified by a large mint mark over the dome of Monticello.


The only US nickels that ever contained silver were special "war nickels" minted from late 1942 to 1945. As of 10/2015, they sell for about $1 each in average condition. War nickels were made of an alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese because nickel metal was needed for the war effort. They can be identified by a large mint mark letter over the dome of Monticello on the back. All other US nickels dating back to 1866 are made of an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper.


It's a common misconception that because dimes, quarters, and half dollars minted before 1965 were silver, nickels also had silver in them. However the standard composition for US nickels has been an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper ever since the coin was introduced in 1866. The only US nickels that ever contained silver were the famous "war nickels" minted from mid-1942 to 1945. These coins were struck in an alloy of 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese because nickel was needed for the war effort.


It's a common misconception that because dimes, quarters, and half dollars minted before 1965 were silver, nickels also had silver in them. However the standard composition for US nickels has been an alloy of 25% nickel and 75% copper ever since the coin was introduced in 1866. The only US nickels that ever contained silver were the famous "war nickels" minted from mid-1942 to 1945. These coins were struck in an alloy of 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese because nickel was needed for the war effort.



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