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Hard Disk Drives

Can Windows XP handle two slave drives?

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2009-05-20 17:10:27
2009-05-20 17:10:27

Yes.

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Yes, you can delete windows 7 by formatting your drive, but all of your files will be gone. If you have two hard drives, you can either copy your data from one drive to the other or put xp/vista on the second one and use the windows 7 drive as a slave.

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Each IDE slot can handle two drives. One drive will be the master and the other will be the slave depending o the configuration. If the jumpers of one drive is configured to set the drive as MA (Master), the second must be configured to SL (Slave). Both drives may be configured as CS (Cable Select), if so, The positioning on the ribbon cable will determine whic one is the master and which is the slave

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Only two drives can be supported on an IDE cable. One Master and one Slave.

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Some IDE drives have a master/slave jumper, but a significant number of IDE drives defaulted to a "cable select" setting where the drive would determine for itself whether it was the master or the slave by which of the two sockets on the cable it was plugged into.

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On the older style ATA drives, now called PATA or simply IDE, each drive chain had two positions for drives. One was called the Master, and the other the Slave drive. The drives performed in exactly the same manner, and the only difference most people would notice was that the Master drive was given a drive letter before the slave drive. In short, a Slave drive does everything a Master drive does.

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Yes. There is a process called Dual Booting, but it requires two hard drives. Just search for "how to dual boot windows vista and windows XP?".

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Yes. Check out these two policy settings: User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Explorer | Hide these specified drives in My Computer And User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Explorer | Prevent access to drives from My Computer

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Two ways, setting the jumper on the drive to set as master or slave. Or if you use cable select, the drive at the end of the cable should be the master.

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You can't. If your computer has multiple hard drives you need to designate one as a master and the other as a slave. The master (or main hard drive) stores and uses the preferrred operating system while the slave serves as primarily data storage. If you put even the same operating system on the hard drives the computer will either hang or crash because it will try to run "multiple instances" of the operating system because it cant differentiate which drive is the master and which is slave regardless of how they are hooked up. The same holds true for using different operating systems on the same machine (Vista and XP). Choose which operating system you really want, install it on the master hard drive, and designate the other as a slave (with NO operating system files on it whatsoever) - its the only way to do it. In order to use both XP and Vista you need two separate computers.

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Check the motherboard. You can connect two drives to a single parallel cable. Most traditional motherboards have two IDE sockets and you can run a maximum of four drives. (one cable per socket, two drives per cable) but you need to configure the drives with jumpers as "primary" and "slave". Many of the newer motherboards have a "SATA" (Serial ATA) socket or some combination of SATA and IDE but you'd have to use a SATA drive with a SATA cable to use the SATA socket.

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There is no requirement that one or the other is the Master or Slave, as long as one of them is (if they are on the same cable.)

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I'm assuming your using Windows. You can see the drives by double clicking "My Computer" on your desktop. From there you can double click on the drives to see the contents. If you can't see the other drive, make sure its installed properly.

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The "master/slave" designation is necessary for the disk controller. It has little to do with the dual boot.

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Windows Vista provides two tools for exploring the files and folders on your computer- WINDOWS EXPLORER and the COMPUTER WINDOW. Both display the contents of your computer, using icons to represent drives, folders, and files.

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Jumpers are used with the IDE (aka P-ATA) drives (hard disks or other drives like DVD recorder) . There can be two drives on the same cable with this norm, a master and a slave. The controller of the disk need to know if it is supposed to be the master or the slave. Jumpers are set to this purpose. There is a special mode called "cable select" where the position on the cable determines the mode (disk at the end of the cable is master, disk in the middle of the cable is slave)

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There are jumpers on the drives that differentiate the master from the slave. If the jumpers aren't set correctly, the BIOS will not recognize them. In addition, some IDE ribbon cables are also labled Drive 0 (or Master) and Drive 1 (or Slave). If the jumpers are set correct, but the drives are plugged into the ribbon cable incorrectly, the computer will not recognize the drives.

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depends on the BIOS and the Hardirves. Some older IDE drives have a switch or a jumper on them that u can select Master or Slave. Some computer you can change this in the BIOS. Master being the controller and slave being the controlled

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FAT (file allocation table) and NTFS (Windows NT file system).

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IDE hard drives have the bulk of their controlling hardware built into the hard disk itself, in order for two drives to share an IDE channel, one must be set for master and the other set for slave. This is done so they do not interfere with each other when transferring data to/from the rest of the computer.

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It's possible to have two mass storage devices on a single IDE cable. The first device will have it's jumpers set to "Master" and the second device will be set to "Slave". That is only a way FOR THE HARDWARE to differentiate between the two drives.

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Yeah. When you start the computer it'll probably ask which one you want to use. If it doesn't, it'll just start the other one.

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If you have two hard drives, and one is an IDEE drive using fat32 file structure, and the other is a different kind of drive and file system, your operating system may have difficulty accessing files on one or the other of your hard drives. This is not usually a problem with Windows XP, but older operating systems may not see one or the other of the drives.

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Voltage drives the current between two points in a circuit

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Check the jumpers on the optical drives, play around with those. Check for compatibility with your OS, check the device manager, check for possible drivers needed although unlikely.

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Generally speaking, no. Most applications write their settings to the Windows registry. When the installation of Windows they were installed in isn't running, the applications cannot read their important settings, and so most will not function. "Portable" apps that store their setting in a local configuration file should run fine.


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