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Can a 30A 240V outlet be replaced by a 20A 240V one?

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2015-07-14 16:09:42
2015-07-14 16:09:42

You can, but be advised that whatever you plug into the new outlet should not exceed 5000W capacity (20A x 250V = 5000W)or you could risk overheating the new outlet with serious results. To prevent this, you should make sure the circuit breaker is a 20A also.

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An existing outlet can be converted by replacing the 30A circuit breakers or fuses in the circuit breaker or fuse box with 15A breakers or fuses. The 30A outlet should also be replaced by a 15A outlet. This is all that is required if the wire from the supply to the outlet is 10, 12, or 14 guage. The existing wire should be 10 guage wire to handle the 30A and there will be no problem in the same wire providing the 15A.

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You have to replace the wire (as you are increasing the current capacity), the outlet, and the breaker. Essentially you have to remove the old circuit and put in a new one. You can't reuse parts of the old circuit as you are increasing the current capacity and they would be underrated.

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A two pole 20A circuit breaker can be used for any 240V load that requires 20A, with supply conductors no smaller than 12AWG. Since a clothes dryer typically requires 30A, and a range 40A to 50A, a 20A 240V circuit could probably be a window air conditioner, pool pump, or some other 20A 240V load.

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It would have to be a 30 amp breaker to use the full power of the welder. I'd say go with the 30A. The general rule is that your planned load should only be 80% of the circuit capacity. That means a 30A circuit should have a maximum load of of (30*0.8) = 24A. With the 30 amp breaker you must have at least #10 wires feeding the circuit.

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The fuse diagram for my 91 Capri is as fallows: Engine 15A Stop 20A Power Window 30A \ Meter 10A Hazard 15A ------ HTD B-light 20A Cigar 15A Tail 15A IG Relay Room 10A door lock 30A Audio 15A \ Fog Lamp 20A Air Cond 15A ----- \ Cooling Fan 20A Wiper 20A Heater 30A The IG Relay and the Heater are the big ones on the side of the fuse box.

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Assuming a 120V circuit then a 30A Single Pole. For a 240V circuit an 30A two pole. Of course anything smaller that a 30A is acceptable. 30A is the maximum allowed.

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Yes and no. You can't put a 30A outlet on a 50A breaker as it will be a fire hazard. You can put a 50A outlet on it safely. Then you can plug the 30A load into it, but this is unwise and can be dangerous if you don't put fuses in your pigtail adapter. The best solution: Go ahead and install your 30A outlet but replace the 50A breaker with a 30A breaker. This is the safest and cleanest solution.

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The outlet is rated for 30A, so anything up to, but not exceeding 30A can be plugged in.

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No, you're fine. Breakers are mainly used to protect the wires (and people), not the appliance. The appliance should have its own overcurrent protection (a fuse usually). The 30 amp breaker will work in this case. First off, dryer outlets are usually 30A as a standard, just like normal wall outlets are 15A. Secondly, you want your expected load to be 80% of your breaker size. So, a 20A load would call for a minimum 25A breaker, they just rounded up to the standard 30A breaker. (Which has a maximum expected load, by this rule, of 24A.) Good question though.

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Fuse number 7 on drop down panel inside glovebox. 30A or 20A can be used

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The correct voltage is actually closer to 240 volts in most areas of the US. NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturer Association) has diagrams of different recepticles. There are actually different sizes of 240 V recepticles. A 20A (amp), a 30A, and a 50 A.

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It's under the bonnet, at the base of the coolant reservoir. There is a 30a strip fuse, and a 20a fuse behind it.

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You really cant do it because a 220 has a heating element in it to dry the clothes unlike gas that uses fire to dry the clothes and the 120 is to turn the drum.Your drier will keep poppin breakers which isn't good at all.Outlets and Power(110V outlets and 120V outlets are practically the same for this discussion. I will refer to them as 120V. Same with 220V/240V outlets.) By 110V outlet I'm assuming you mean a standard US 120V 15A outlet.This outlet can provide a maximum of 15A at 120V. This means the outlet can provide 1,800W of power. ( Volts x Amps = Watts ) This is the maximum amount of power this outlet can provide, no more. Also, this is assuming nothing else is drawing power off the circuit this outlet is on. If you try to pull 1800W from an outlet and plug anything else into this circuit, the breaker will blow.Your dryer is designed to run off a 30A 240V circuit. Let's say, for argument, it draws 24A at 240V. This means your appliance requires 5,760W of power to run correctly. This is 3.2 times the absolute maximum amount of power your 120V outlet can provide. There is no way you can run this appliance off this outlet. You have a larger problem here than the voltage difference.You can't, you need both a and b phases. You need to install an 240v receptacle.And don't upgrade to 240V by using the same wires!! Some complete idiots will try this and burn the neighborhood down.

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No, A double pole breaker is going to give you 220 volts. 220 Volts is too much voltage for a 110 Volt outlet to handle. == Answer== Better to pull the duplex 30a and install to single-pole 20a breakers...if one kicks out, you will know which side the problem's on. And there's no problem with running a 20a circuit over 10awg wire.

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No, this is not a recommended procedure. The breakers main job is to protect the wire that is connected to it. A 20A breaker will have a #12 wire (rated 20A) connected to it. A 30A breaker will have a #10 wire (rated 30A) connected to it. As you can see if you use a 30A breaker on a #12 wire you could overload the wire by 10 amps. I have seen an incident where the insulation has melted off of an overloaded wire, the wire short out and a fire start before the bigger size breaker tripped. DON'T DO IT.

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240V x 30A = 7.2kWor the more general formula:Volts X Amps = Watts

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here ya go buddy i got a 91 convert and its 1- HTR-AC ATC 30A 2-PWDO 30A C/B 3-HD-LAMP HORN 30A C/B 4 5-BACK-UP LAMPS 20A 6-TURN SIGNAL 20A 7-REAR WIPER 20A 8 ILLUM LAMPS 5A 9- FOG LAMPS 20A 10-TAIL LAMPS 20A 11-CIGAR LIGHTER 20A 12- 13- 14- GAUGES 5A 15- SPEED CONTROL 2A 16- 17- HEADLAMP LT-LOW 10A 18- HEADLAMP RT-LOW 10A 19- HEADLAMP LT- HIGH 10A 20- HEADLAMP RT-HIGH 10A 21- STOP LAMPS 20A 22- 23- 24- 25-HEATED MIRRORS 5A 26- INTERIOR LAMPS 10A 27- RADIO 10A 28-FRONT WIPER 20A (All are numbered top down left to right 12345 next row then the next 5 and so on) hope this helps out a ton dude

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I suspect you mean GFIC breaker. The dryer will not cause the breaker to fail.

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Most residential dryers run off a 30A 240V outlet. Indiviually their power ratings will vary, but they shouldn't draw more than 5.7kW. The typical dryer weighs something over 100 pounds to something under 150 pounds. Kind of a big window, but without specifics....

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If you want an American plug to power a 30A 220V device look at a dryer outlet. It will have an extra neutral conductor, but it is standard. Otherwise, you can go with a 220V 30A TwistLok plug. All the home centers [I've been to] carry these plugs. 10ga wire is heavy enough for 30A runs under 75ft, though for a 27A appliance you should consider a 40A breaker with 8ga wire.

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you do NOT put two 110v breakers in. you put 1 two pole breaker in. the panel is designed to give you 220v off one side OR the other side if you use a 2 pole breaker on one side or the other side. If you look at both 120V lines on an oscilloscope you will notice that they are both 120V to the neutral, but they are 180 degrees out of phase. This means that when one hot is at +120V the other is at -120V. So between the two you have 240V. If you put your meter across both hots you should see 240V. If you do not see 240V across both hots you (or an unlicenced electrician) has wired the outlet without using a proper 220V breaker. You do not see 240V because the hots are in phase, to the voltage differential is 0V, not 240V. 220V breakers cannot do this, unless forcebly installed in the wrong type panel. More than likely someone tried to wire it with 110V breakers.

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No. The receptacle, wiring, and breaker ratings should all be matched properly. Replacing the 50A receptacle with a 30A receptacle isn't a problem, since the wire should be rated at least 50A. But a 30A receptacle should be protected with a 30A double pole breaker. The breaker only costs about $8.00, so why wouldn't you change it given you don't have to change the wire which would actually be expensive or time consuming? The fact that you mention a 50A receptacle protected by a 20A existing breaker isn't normal either. I would check to make sure the wiring is actually rated for 50A and that someone didn't just throw a 50A receptacle onto a 20A circuit. (This means your wiring should be at least #8AWG THHN Copper wire.) If you protected a 30A receptacle with a 20A breaker, the load might trip the breaker often, considering the appliance requiring a 30A receptacle probably requires about 30A. If you do not understand the work well enough to accomplish it yourself properly and safely, don't try it. Consult a professional electrician, as they are proficient enough to do it properly and safely. When working on electrical circuits and equipment, make sure to de-energize the circuit you will be working on. Then test the circuit with a definitive means to make sure it is off (multimeter with metal tipped leads, voltage tester with metal tipped leads, etc., not a non-contact tester, which is non-definitive.)

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=== === Assuming you want to plug in say a 120V washer next to the 240V dryer, you would need to install a separate 120V 20A circuit. This is not a simple task and can kill you in several ways if you get it wrong. Please have a qualified electrician do it, if you do not understand the following discussion completely, or otherwise doubt your abilities. Any new outlet must be of a type protected by a GFCI or be wired into a GFCI-protected circuit if it is within an unfinished basement, bathroom, garage or any room that has wet or damp areas. The US National Electrical Code requires that a laundry outlet have its own separate circuit. If the laundry circuit in a garage or basement is used only for an appliance that is not easily moved (washing machine, freezer), it need not be GFCI protected, but only if there are other reachable GFCI outlets in the same room. You will need to add a 120 V 20A breaker to the breaker box (or sub-panel, if you have one with adequate feeders), run a separate 20A cable to a separate junction/work box near the 240 V outlet, and install the 120 V outlet. You are not allowed to just run a cord to your laundry from another outlet on a circuit used for other things, nor to connect the new outlet to an existing outlet. You may, however, extend an existing circuit to yet another outlet in the laundry area for purpose of ironing, fan, or other small appliances. If you plug an iron into the laundry outlet while the washer is going, you're likely to overload the 20A breaker. Under no circumstances should you attempt to "split" the 240 into a 120 outlet! The dryer circuit is protected with a 30-Amp or larger breaker (5000 watts is over 20 Amps). If anything had an overload, the ordinary 15-amp or 20-amp outlet for 120 volts and anything plugged into it could overheat and catch fire well before the 30A breaker shut off the current. A "combination" washer/dryer unit is designed with internal overload protection for the 120-volt equipment. As always, if you are in doubt about what to do, the best advice anyone should give you is to call a licensed electrician to advise what work is needed.If you do this work yourself, always turn off the powerat the breaker box/fuse panel BEFORE you attempt to do any workANDalways use a meter or voltage indicatorto insure the circuit is, in fact, de-energized.IF YOU ARE NOT ALREADY SURE YOU CAN DO THIS JOBSAFELY AND COMPETENTLYREFER THIS WORK TO QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS.


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