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Commercial Insurance

Can a building that has been burned be insured for liability only?


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2015-07-15 21:46:36
2015-07-15 21:46:36

Yes, you can purchase a "monoline" Commercial General Liability policy for a vacant lot if the building has been burned to the ground. If the building is only partially damaged or a significant amount of debris remains at the site, you may have difficulty finding coverage because the undamaged portion of the building may present a hazard insurers would be reluctant to cover.

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A liability insurer has two primary duties to an insured who has been sued: (1) a duty to defend; and (2) a duty to indemnify. The duty to defend means that the insurer is obliged, at its own expense, to hire counsel to defend the insured provided that the allegations of the lawsuit come within the ambit of the coverage of the policy. That is, for example, the liability coverage of a homeowner's policy will not be triggered to defend you if you are sued for an automobile collision. If you have not yet been sued, but a claim has been asserted (such as by a demand letter from the aggrieved party), the liability insurer is obliged to investigate the facts of the claim. Most personal liability policies give the insurer the right to settle claims without the consent of the insured, so it may also make a payment to the claimant. The correlative obligation of the insured is to timely notify the insured of all claims made against him/her/it, forward suit papers, and cooperate with both the insurer and the attorney hired to defend the suit. The cooperation includes meeting with the attorney as needed, responding to requests, attending depositions, attending trial, and other activities. The second main obligation of a liability insurer is to indemnify the insured, meaning, to protect him/her/it from financial loss. This involves paying damages for which the insured may be found legally liable (within policy limits). Again, the insurer usually has the right to settle claims when it deems it in its and the insured's best interests to do so. Indeed, the insurer has a specific duty to settle claims within policy limits when it is possible to do so (that is, when the claimant will accept that amount of money in return for a release of the insured of further liability).

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as per my observation this is the sector where we need to work because only 0.2% people of india has been insured as compared to America where 75% of population is insured. Moreever the insurance is not only restricted to life insurance its scene has been change we could have insuranc of health,property,liability..etc..

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If it is insured the amount has not been made public.

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Torahs have been burned for centuries.

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Listen to the explanation. It can be because the insured did not have the specific coverage to pay for your damage. For example, if the other party had collision coverage only on his/her auto policy, it would not pay for your damages because it covers only damage to his/her car. Liability coverage would be needed to pay for your damages. Another reason might be that the other party, especially if insured under a commercial policy, might have a large self-insured retention. This is similar in nature to a deductible, but applies to the liability coverage. The insurer is not obliged to pay until damages exceed the amount of the retention. Yet another reason is that even if the other party did once have liability coverage, it may have been canceled because the personh did not make the required premium payments. The insured is generally required to timely report the collision to his/her insurer so that the insurer can investigate. If there has been no report, or if the insured otherwise fails to cooperate with his/her insurer, coverage may be denied. Finally, the insurer, after investigation, may conclude that its insured did not cause the damage. If so, you will have to decide whether to sue the other party for damages. If the occurrence was one to which the insurance applies, the insurer will generally defend its insured in the suit and pay those damages which the insured is found to be legally liable.


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