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Answered 2012-06-11 15:42:13

Yes, you can create a static class inside an interface, but it is normally not a good idea.

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Interface can be defined inside another class?

yes ,interface can be defined inside another class


What is the advantage of abstract classes over interfaces?

The main advantage of an abstract class it the fact that, you can actually write methods that are not abstract. i.e., you can write methods with concrete code inside them. So when an abstract class is extended, all the abstract methods will be implemented by the child class but the child class will also inherit the code of this concrete method you wrote in the abstract class. This is the only thing an interface cannot do and is the advantage of an abstract class over an interface.


What do you mean by inheriting the interface?

In object oriented programming, a derived class inherits the protected and public members of its base class. Those members therefore define the interface that is inherited by the derived class. The derived class may augment that interface to provide a more specialised implementation of the interface, without the need to re-write the generic interface of the base class. The implication is that the derived class is a more specialised form of the base class.


What is the difference between abstract and interface?

The difference are:An abstract class can have methods that actually have code inside them whereas an Interface cannot (An Interface can be thought of as a 100% pure abstract class)All variables in an Interface are public, static, final whereas that is not the case in Abstract classes


Why protected access specifier is not in interfaces?

Because an interface is like a contract/skeleton which decides what the implementing class has to do. So, if any entity in an interface is protected, they would not be available to the class that is implementing the interface. Hence, all the variables and methods declared inside an interface are public by default



What is difference between Abstract Class and Interface?

All the methods declared inside an Interface are abstract. Where as abstract class must have at least one abstract method and others may be concrete or abstract. In Interface we need not use the keyword abstract for the methods.


Can you instantiate an interface?

No. You cannot instantiate an interface. However, you can implement the interface using a class and instantiate the class


How do you create an interface?

by declaring in the header of the class: public/private interface [interfaceName] and do not write any method body(i.e. public void dance();)


Is interface class a valid term?

Yes. An interface in essence is a java class and so you can use the term interface class. But, using the term class along with the term interface can cause ambiguity or misunderstandings among novice java developers. So, using the term "Interface" along would suffice to refer to a type of class which is the "Interface"


What is an interface in Java?

An interface is a collection of methods that must be implemented by the implementing class.An interface defines a contract regarding what a class must do, without saying anything about how the class will do it.Interface can contain declaration of methods and variables.implementing class must define all the methods declared in the interfaceIf a class implements an interface and does not implement all the methods then class itself must be declared as abstractVariables in interface automatically become static and final variableof the implementing classMembers of interface are implicitly public, so need not be declared as public.An interface must be implemented in class.


What is the difference between a class and an interface?

A class is a data type. An interface consists of the private, protected and public members of a class, allowing consumers of the class to interact with the class representation in a controlled manner. The private interface is only accessible to the class itself and to friends of the class. The protected interface is similar to the private interface but is also accessible to derivatives of the class. The public interface is fully accessible. The private and protected interfaces are intended purely for use by the class implementers while the public interface is intended for use by both consumers and implementers.


Why instance in abstract or interface?

we can make object of interface but in abstract we can not make object of it interface ab= new Classs(): in interface we maintain multiple inhetence by use of obj of interface we if inherit two class have same fun then we give the name of that interface and call the pertucular that fun interface ab= new class() ab.add(); but in Astract Class we cannot make object of it only class class wich inherit it can make object class ab2= new Class(); and by obj we call function of drived class ob2.add();


What is similarities between Abstract Class and Interface?

If a class has one abstract method ,the class has to be an abstract class.Methods can be implemented in abstract class.Whereas a interface is like a abstract class...the only difference being that the methods are never implemented in Interface.


Difference between class and interface?

This que. is already answered as: 1. A class can have methods that have code in them whereas an interface can have only method declarations 2. Classes can be extended while Interfaces have to be implemented 3. All variables declared inside an interface are public and static by default while it is not the case in classes.


What is an interface and how will you go about implementing an interface?

an Interface is nothing but a contract as to how a class should behave. It just declares the behavior as empty methods and the implementing class actually writes the code that will determine the behavior. When you implement an interface, you're agreeing to adhere to the contract defined in the interface. That means you're agreeing to provide legal implementations for every method defined in the interface, and that anyone who knows what the interface methods look like can rest assured that they can invoke those methods on an instance of your implementing class. (Thy need not bother much about how you have implemented it. All they bother about is whether a method of the name mentioned in the interface is available or not) Now, you might stop me and ask, what if I implement an interface and opt not to write code for a method that I am supposed to? The answer is simple. The compiler wouldn't let you do that. You cannot successfully implement an interface without providing method implementation for all the methods declared inside the interface. This is how the java system ensures that when someone knows a certain method name in an interface and has an instance of a class that implements it, can actually call that method without fear that the method isn't implemented inside the class. Assuming an interface, Convertible, with two methods: openHood(), and setOpenHoodFactor(), the following class will compile: public class Ball implements Convertible { // Keyword 'implements' public void openHood() { } public void setOpenHoodFactor(int bf) { } } Ok, I know what you are thinking now. "This has got to be the worst implementation class that you have seen". Though it compiles and runs as well, it is actually doing nothing… the interface contract guarantees that the class implementing it will have a method of a particular name but it never guaranteed a good implementation. In other words, the compiler does not bother whether you have code inside your method or not. All it cares is if you have methods of the matching names as in the interface. That's all… Implementation classes must adhere to the same rules for method implementation as a class extending an abstract class. In order to be a legal implementation class, a nonabstract implementation class must do the following: • Provide concrete (nonabstract) implementations for all methods from the declared interface. • Follow all the rules for legal overrides. • Declare no checked exceptions on implementation methods other than those declared by the interface method, or subclasses of those declared by the interface method. • Maintain the signature of the interface method, and maintain the same return type (or a subtype). • It does not have to declare the exceptions declared in the interface method declaration.


What is public access of a class?

Public access defines the class interface that is available outside of the class. Private access defines the class interface that is only accessible within the class and within friends of the class. Protected access is similar to private access, but extends the interface to derived classes as well.


Define interface in java?

An Interface is nothing but a contract as to how a class should behave. It just declares the behavior as empty methods and the implementing class actually writes the code that will determine the behavior. When you implement an interface, you're agreeing to adhere to the contract defined in the interface. That means you're agreeing to provide legal implementations for every method defined in the interface, and that anyone who knows what the interface methods look like can rest assured that they can invoke those methods on an instance of your implementing class. (Thy need not bother much about how you have implemented it. All they bother about is whether a method of the name mentioned in the interface is available or not) Now, you might stop me and ask, what if I implement an interface and opt not to write code for a method that I am supposed to? The answer is simple. The compiler wouldn't let you do that. You cannot successfully implement an interface without providing method implementation for all the methods declared inside the interface. This is how the java system ensures that when someone knows a certain method name in an interface and has an instance of a class that implements it, can actually call that method without fear that the method isn't implemented inside the class. Assuming an interface, Convertible, with two methods: openHood(), and setOpenHoodFactor(), the following class will compile: public class Ball implements Convertible { // Keyword 'implements' public void openHood() { } public void setOpenHoodFactor(int bf) { } } Ok, I know what you are thinking now. "This has got to be the worst implementation class that you have seen". Though it compiles and runs as well, it is actually doing nothing… the interface contract guarantees that the class implementing it will have a method of a particular name but it never guaranteed a good implementation. In other words, the compiler does not bother whether you have code inside your method or not. All it cares is if you have methods of the matching names as in the interface. That's all… Implementation classes must adhere to the same rules for method implementation as a class extending an abstract class. In order to be a legal implementation class, a nonabstract implementation class must do the following: • Provide concrete (nonabstract) implementations for all methods from the declared interface. • Follow all the rules for legal overrides. • Declare no checked exceptions on implementation methods other than those declared by the interface method, or subclasses of those declared by the interface method. • Maintain the signature of the interface method, and maintain the same return type (or a subtype). • It does not have to declare the exceptions declared in the interface method declaration.


Can you create an object of abstract class and interface?

No, not directly. You cannot use new operator to create either. However, you may create an instance of derived class from the abstract class, and treat (by casting, for example) as an instance of the abstract class. Similar to an interface: create an object from a class that implements the target interface, then treat that object as an instance of that interface.


When you define a c plus plus class what items are considered part of the interface?

The interface of a C++ class is the public methods and attributes that are exposed by the class. In a pure abstract base class, the interface is enforced by the compiler in each of the derived child classes.


How do you use an interface?

When you implement an interface, you're agreeing to adhere to the contract defined in the interface. That means you're agreeing to provide legal implementations for every method defined in the interface, and that anyone who knows what the interface methods look like can rest assured that they can invoke those methods on an instance of your implementing class. (Thy need not bother much about how you have implemented it. All they bother about is whether a method of the name mentioned in the interface is available or not) Now, you might stop me and ask, what if I implement an interface and opt not to write code for a method that I am supposed to? The answer is simple. The compiler wouldn't let you do that. You cannot successfully implement an interface without providing method implementation for all the methods declared inside the interface. This is how the java system ensures that when someone knows a certain method name in an interface and has an instance of a class that implements it, can actually call that method without fear that the method isn't implemented inside the class. Assuming an interface, Convertible, with two methods: openHood(), and setOpenHoodFactor(), the following class will compile: public class Ball implements Convertible { // Keyword 'implements' public void openHood() { } public void setOpenHoodFactor(int bf) { } } Ok, I know what you are thinking now. "This has got to be the worst implementation class that you have seen". Though it compiles and runs as well, it is actually doing nothing… the interface contract guarantees that the class implementing it will have a method of a particular name but it never guaranteed a good implementation. In other words, the compiler does not bother whether you have code inside your method or not. All it cares is if you have methods of the matching names as in the interface. That's all… Implementation classes must adhere to the same rules for method implementation as a class extending an abstract class. In order to be a legal implementation class, a nonabstract implementation class must do the following: • Provide concrete (nonabstract) implementations for all methods from the declared interface. • Follow all the rules for legal overrides. • Declare no checked exceptions on implementation methods other than those declared by the interface method, or subclasses of those declared by the interface method. • Maintain the signature of the interface method, and maintain the same return type (or a subtype). • It does not have to declare the exceptions declared in the interface method declaration


How do you add a class or an interface to a package in java?

By adding the fully qualified package name as the file line in the Class or Interface.


Difference between a class and an interface?

Both Class and Interface are basic constructs in Java which are part of every java based application. A class is a concrete definition which contains proper definitions for every functionality the class is expected to perform. Whereas, an interface is a skeleton which outlines the functions which it is expected to perform and leaves the implementation part to the class that is implementing this interface.


What is the latent function of friends?

The only function of a friend is to extend the private class interface outwith the class, essentially making the friend part of the class interface.


Why use interfaces in Java?

an Interface is nothing but a contract as to how a class should behave. It just declares the behavior as empty methods and the implementing class actually writes the code that will determine the behavior. When you implement an interface, you're agreeing to adhere to the contract defined in the interface. That means you're agreeing to provide legal implementations for every method defined in the interface, and that anyone who knows what the interface methods look like can rest assured that they can invoke those methods on an instance of your implementing class. (Thy need not bother much about how you have implemented it. All they bother about is whether a method of the name mentioned in the interface is available or not) Now, you might stop me and ask, what if I implement an interface and opt not to write code for a method that I am supposed to? The answer is simple. The compiler wouldn't let you do that. You cannot successfully implement an interface without providing method implementation for all the methods declared inside the interface. This is how the java system ensures that when someone knows a certain method name in an interface and has an instance of a class that implements it, can actually call that method without fear that the method isnt implemented inside the class. Assuming an interface, Convertible, with two methods: openHood(), and setOpenHoodFactor(), the following class will compile: public class Ball implements Convertible { // Keyword 'implements' public void openHood() { } public void setOpenHoodFactor(int bf) { } } Ok, I know what you are thinking now. "This has got to be the worst implementation class that you have seen". Though it compiles and runs as well, it is actually doing nothing… the interface contract guarantees that the class implementing it will have a method of a particular name but it never guaranteed a good implementation. In other words, the compiler does not bother whether you have code inside your method or not. All it cares is if you have methods of the matching names as in the interface. That's all… Implementation classes must adhere to the same rules for method implementation as a class extending an abstract class. In order to be a legal implementation class, a nonabstract implementation class must do the following: • Provide concrete (nonabstract) implementations for all methods from the declared interface. • Follow all the rules for legal overrides. • Declare no checked exceptions on implementation methods other than those declared by the interface method, or subclasses of those declared by the interface method. • Maintain the signature of the interface method, and maintain the same return type (or a subtype). • It does not have to declare the exceptions declared in the interface method declaration


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