Car Batteries

Can a cut negative battery cable short out vehicle?

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2012-04-13 18:41:02
2012-04-13 18:41:02

No, that cable is connected to ground, so it cannot short out.

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The negative battery cable will short out if it is loose or corroded. Check both ends of the battery cable for corrosion. Make sure both ends are tight.


Safe practice directs that when connecting battery cables to the battery, the positive cable should beattached first, and then the negative cable last. In disconnecting battery cables, safe practice directs cable order in the reverse, I.E., the negative cable is disconnected first, and and the positive cable last. The reason for this safety procedure is that IF the ground cable is attached first, then when using a metallic wrench to tighten the positive cable clamp, and IF the wrench in contact with the positive terminal clamp were to come in contact with any grounded metal of the vehicle, then a tremendous short circuit would occur. A massive short circuit results in massive arcing [fireball] which can severely burn a person, damage the battery [or cause it to explode], damage the vehicle electrical system, or worse, cause the vehicle to catch on fire. Always connect the negative cable last, and disconnect the negative cable first!


Dead short in the battery. Battery can explode and damage can be done to the electronics in the vehicle.


It is a safety issue. The reason is that when you are using a wrench to disconnect the battery cable you can easily touch a portion of the car that is grounded. If you were disconnecting the positive + cable first and you accidently touch a metal part the vehicle you will create a massive short circuit with the fireworks involved. The wrench in your hand will become an arc welder. By disconnecting the negative - cable first there is no danger of this happening as touching a metal part of the vehicle will do nothing as you are already working with the ground. Always disconnect the ground cable first and then you can move to the positive cable without worries.


Nothing unless the negative cable is connected. If it is then you get a dead short. Battery could explode or just arc severely.


There is no way that the positive battery terminal was ever connected to the chassis. This would be a dead short and would fry the battery. Negative to chassis is correct, but positive to chassis, no way. That positive cable goes somewhere else.


With the car in the off position, remove the negative battery cable and use a multi-meter to test continuity between the positive battery terminal and the engine block. If there is continuity, you have a short.


Disconnect negative battery cable first. Locate alternator. locate belt tensioner. Use rachet to retract belt tensioner so belt can be removed off alternator. Remove alternator mounting bolts. disconnect positive cable and field wires from alternator. Remove alternator. Reverse to install. Removal of negative battery cable first prevents a short should the wrench touch metal or car ground. Some mechanics just remove the positive cable but risk a dead short shoud the wrench touch vehicle ground.


The alternator really can be shorted out but you can cause a short if you contact the hot battery connection to ground. whenever you work on a car, you should really disconnect the negative battery cable. It takes that battery out of harms way and you too.


If a jump start will not start it then it is not the battery. You either have a short in the battery cable connection to the battery or the engine/starter or you have a bad starter. Test for a short in battery, battery Cables or connection. Trace where the positive battery cable connects to usually an electrical box on the inside of the engine compartment and put the positive jumper cable there while putting the negative jumper cable on a metal part of the engine (you are by-passing the battery and the battery cables completely). If it does not start now then you have a bad starter.


take the negative terminal off and put a test light between the cable and the battery post. if the light comes on and then goes out. there is no short if it comes on and stays on then there is a short.


Always hook up the red or positive cable first, otherwise you could cause a short between the battery and the car through your wrench. Ths of course could cause an explosion or other problems. The black or negative cable goes straight to the engine and the car's frame, so your wrench can touch the frame when you are tightening the cable end on the battery with no worry.


you might have a short take off the negative terminal and connect a test light to the negative cable then touch the negative post with the other end of the test light if the light goes on u have a short


how did you know that you have short? is the battery going low or dead on you?there is a way to find where the short is comming from.you need a tester,power tester.disconnect the battery negative end ,connect the tester between the battery negative and the negative cable.if the tester light comes on and stay.you have a short.start removing fuses until the light goes off.the last fuse you took off with the off light is the system that have a short.normally from alarm system that wiring installed wrong.good luck


The short is under your battery tray. Find where your ground cable (The negative cable on your battery) screws to the engine block. Trace this ground cable to where it goes under your battery. It crosses over a wire with two connectors (this is your neutral safety switch). This is where your short will be, the crossing cables rub each other down to the wire. Tape both wires and insulate with rubber and you should be good to go.


Short the possitve and negative terminals.


Don't have to take the battery out but it should be disconnected. Carefully disconnect the negative (usually black) battery cable from the battery. Be sure you do not let the connector end of that cable or the negative battery terminal touch anything! (I put a heavy-duty plastic baggie over the connecting end of the cable & secure it with a rubberband. No baggie ties!) If the free end of the cable, or the disconnected terminal, touches anything conductive it will short out whatever it touches & could cause hundreds (or thousands) of dollars of damage. It could even cause an explosion if there is hydrogen gas accumulated near the battery, serious injury, or even death. Once the negative battery terminal is disconnected, there should be no electricitity flowing anywhere, & it should be safe to change the fuse.


No. That would short out and potentially cause a fire. The negative side will go to the frame or the body to ground.


The cable connected directly to the car body or engine. Usually the negative. The other cable will have more than one wire coming off it. I once blew up battery doing it the other way. The spanner welded itself to the chassis when it touched the battery terminal and the chassis at the same time causing a massive short. Lots of pretty sparks and flames though.


The trick to this is to first back the bike onto a 2x4. don't forget to put one under the stand as well. Then, locate the battery which is encased in a black metal box with a hatch on the bottom. Next, unhook the positive power cable (red) and move it away so it does not make contact with the battery, next unconnected the negative on the other side. Then using a 10mm socket unbolt the bolts that are on the bottom front of the case (while facing the side of the bike). slowly tape the front lip of the hatch and the battery should fall out. Then to install the new one. Just do the reverse of this. Making sure that you connect the red terminal first and the black ground wire last. NO! FIRST remove the NEGATIVE cable from the battery and then the positive. On any vehicle, always remove the grounded cable first, and that happens to be the negative on most vehicles. The reason is simple: if you happen to touch ground while removing the grounded cable, nothing happens. If you touch ground and the "hot" cable at the same time while the ground cable is still hooked up, you create a short circuit that can fry the battery, the electrics, or the vehicle. On the S50, the positive "hot" cable is surrounded by a metal box that's hard to avoid with a socket or screwdriver. It's easy to short out. It could even make contact just by having the battery move around while riding, which is why there is a protective cover there.


In this situation it's probably a bad alternator. The brushes could be worn out. Are you sure it's your alternator? To check, start your vehicle and put a volt meter across the terminals on your batter ( pos to pos, neg to neg ). You should read from 12 to 14 volts. If it is lower your alternator may be bad. Also check that you have no shorts in your main battery cable. To do this, disconnect your battery (negative cable first ) and put the positive lead of your ohm meter to the disconnected positive cable and the negative lead to ground ( your disconnected neg cable will do ). You should read infinite resistance; if not a short may be causing your battery to lose a charge. If neither of these things is the problem your battery may be going bad and not holding a charge. To test this pull it and put it on a trickle charger. Most battery chargers will warn tell you if the battery is bad. If you leave it on a slow charge and don't see a higher voltage in 2 hours your battery is probably bad. Most part stores will test your alternator and battery for free but you will have to take them out and to the store.



== == == == == == The procedure for removal and replacement is basically the same for all autos, not just your Concord, so this procedure is generic in nature. The battery has two TERMINAL POSTS, one of which is electrically positive ["hot"], and is usually identified on the battery top with a "+" symbol, and/or the abbreviaton "POS." The other terminal is electrically negative ["ground"] and is identified on the battery top with a "-" symbol, and/or the abbreviation "NEG." To help prevent placing the wrong cable on the terminal of opposite polarity, the posts, and cable clamps are different sizes [diameters], with the positive terminal being slightly larger than the negative. Usually, but not always, the battery cables are identified by the insulation on the positive cable being RED, and the negative cable insulation being BLACK. If, in placing a clamp to a post, you notice that the clamp either is too small to fit the terminal, or too large and loose to fit, THEN you are trying to put the cable/clamp on the WRONG terminal post! Pay very close attention to prevent a REVERSE polarity connection, as this can DESTROY many EXPENSIVE ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS in your vehicle. Both the negative and positive cables are terminated, on their battery ends, with a "split" clamp which encricles the round terminal posts. The clamps are secured to the terminal with a cross bolt which tightens the clamp to the post. A wrench is needed to tighten or loosen the bolt. FOR SAFETY, anytime you are working on or near electrically energized wires or components, ALWAYS DISCONNECT the negative cable from the negative terminal BEFORE doing anything else. It is IMPORTANT that the NEGATIVE [GROUND] cable is removed FIRST because IF the metal wrench should contact between the negative terminal and a grounded metal body component, NOTHING WILL HAPPEN. On the other hand, IF a metal wrench contacts both the positive terminal and grounded metal, WHILE THE NEGATIVE GROUND cable is still connected, a monsterous SHORT CIRCUIT will result, throwing arc sparks everywhere, possibly causing the wrench to overheat, burning your hand, and in the worst case, COULD cause the battery to EXPLODE, spraying shrapnel and SULPHURIC ACID EVERYWHERE !!!!! ALWAYS COMPLETELY DISCONNECT THE NEGATIVE CABLE FIRST ! Once the negative and positive battery cables have been removed, the battery retaining mechanism [there are several different types] must be removed. Some are a bracket which clamps over the top of the battery, while most newer vehicles have a triangular "bar" which mates with a slot in the bottom edge of the battery case. This secures the battery in the tray, and prevents the battery from "bouncing" out. Once the two cables and the retainer have been removed, the battery can be lifted out of the vehicle. Batteries are very heavy relative to their physical size, so be sure to have good footing, good balance, and use safe lifting procedures to prevent physical injury. Installation of the new/replacement battery is simply a matter of reversing the above procedure. Good luck. j3h


The procedure for removal and replacement is basically the same for all autos, not just your Concord, so this procedure is generic in nature. The battery has two TERMINAL POSTS, one of which is electrically positive ["hot"], and is usually identified on the battery top with a "+" symbol, and/or the abbreviaton "POS." The other terminal is electrically negative ["ground"] and is identified on the battery top with a "-" symbol, and/or the abbreviation "NEG." To help prevent placing the wrong cable on the terminal of opposite polarity, the posts, and cable clamps are different sizes [diameters], with the positive terminal being slightly larger than the negative. Usually, but not always, the battery cables are identified by the insulation on the positive cable being RED, and the negative cable insulation being BLACK. If, in placing a clamp to a post, you notice that the clamp either is too small to fit the terminal, or too large and loose to fit, THEN you are trying to put the cable/clamp on the WRONG terminal post! Pay very close attention to prevent a REVERSE polarity connection, as this can DESTROY many EXPENSIVE ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS in your vehicle. Both the negative and positive cables are terminated, on their battery ends, with a "split" clamp which encricles the round terminal posts. The clamps are secured to the terminal with a cross bolt which tightens the clamp to the post. A wrench is needed to tighten or loosen the bolt. FOR SAFETY, anytime you are working on or near electrically energized wires or components, ALWAYS DISCONNECT the negative cable from the negative terminal BEFORE doing anything else. It is IMPORTANT that the NEGATIVE [GROUND] cable is removed FIRST because IF the metal wrench should contact between the negative terminal and a grounded metal body component, NOTHING WILL HAPPEN. On the other hand, IF a metal wrench contacts both the positive terminal and grounded metal, WHILE THE NEGATIVE GROUND cable is still connected, a monsterous SHORT CIRCUIT will result, throwing arc sparks everywhere, possibly causing the wrench to overheat, burning your hand, and in the worst case, COULD cause the battery to EXPLODE, spraying shrapnel and SULPHURIC ACID EVERYWHERE !!!!! ALWAYS COMPLETELY DISCONNECT THE NEGATIVE CABLE FIRST ! Once the negative and positive battery cables have been removed, the battery retaining mechanism [there are several different types] must be removed. Some are a bracket which clamps over the top of the battery, while most newer vehicles have a triangular "bar" which mates with a slot in the bottom edge of the battery case. This secures the battery in the tray, and prevents the battery from "bouncing" out. Once the two cables and the retainer have been removed, the battery can be lifted out of the vehicle. Batteries are very heavy relative to their physical size, so be sure to have good footing, good balance, and use safe lifting procedures to prevent physical injury. Installation of the new/replacement battery is simply a matter of reversing the above procedure. Good luck.


It should be attached to the short positive battery cable.



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