Children and the Law
Child Support

Can a stepfather be forced to pay child support in Illinois?

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2010-01-12 16:32:33
2010-01-12 16:32:33

Only if he adopts the child and he and the other parent later separate/divorce.

There may be some variable for interpretation here. If he's the child's only parental influence, and the father is unknown, a judge may order it, along with all the rights of a father.

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Depending on circumstances, yes. see my profile

In Illinois, each child support payment is a civil judgment.

In most cases the court has the power to permanently terminate parental rights but require the parent(s) to pay all or partial support of the minor child/children. Cases are adjudicated on an individual basis.

A child support law in Illinois requires the non-custodial parent to purchase a percentage of their net income child support. The rates are 20% for 1 child, 28% for 2 children and 32% for 3 children.

The only way a mother can be forced to pay child support in any state, is if she does not have primary custody of the child. If the child or children live primarily with the father, then the mother can be made to pay child support.

The biological father may only stop paying child support under one of the following four circumstances: Death of the child; the child turns 18 and decides not to pursue higher education; the child quits or graduates higher education; or the biological father is found not to be the "true" father. So, if a stepfather adopts them, more than likely, the biological will still be responsible for child support.

If you live in the US.... No. A non-custodial parent can be forced to pay child support, but they cannot be forced to visit.

Such a move will not change the amount of support owed. Illinois will likely ask Tennessee to register the support order.

I want him to take care of his child on his own not be forced.

child labour is just forced to work against their will to support the family economicallythe definition of child labour is when a child is forced to work for little or no money. its mean.

There is no statute of limitations for collecting past-due child support. Or are you referring to filing a new order for retroactive support?

In Illinois, each payment is a judgment.

Yes, a child dropping out of school has no bearing on child support. Depending on what your divorce decree says regarding child support, it normally terminates when the child turns 18.รŠ

In general, child support is a percentage of net income (e.g., in Illinois, 20% for one child, 25% for two children).

Every state honors child support orders. The original support order would stipulate when the support is to end.

See Link BelowChild Support Age-At what age does child support stop and what steps need to be taken to bring this about?

Usually, it's a percentage of current support - in Illinois, 20%.

Not exactly. In Illinois, child support cannot be ordered past the age of majority but "education support" can be. One or even both parents may be ordered to pay education support, based on the child's academic expenses. Education support must also be ordered by a judge, separately from a child support order.

You can find information on child support wage garnishments in Illinois at http://www.illinoisprobono.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.dsp_Content&contentID=2746. This site is geared towards attorneys and has a wealth of Illinois legal information.

the statute of limitations never expires for unpaid child support

Child support is a almost always a percentage of net income - in Illinois, 20% for first child, 25% for second child, etc.

In Illinois abandonment of a child is considered when a parent fails to pay child support or visit a child. This is determined on a case by case basis, and abandonment occurs within months to a year.


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