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Can a teacher sue a district supervisor for defamation of character and slander?

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2007-11-06 18:00:13
2007-11-06 18:00:13

I recommend checking with your Union rep first, but yes you could. You probably won't get anywhere unless you have lots of documentation.

== The situation sounds like this character is sabotaging your efforts. Efforts to get this taken care of in the courts may take up several years and hours of your time, not to mention worry and stress. Another possibility, but less satisfying on some levels, is to walk away. Leaving on your own terms and in your own time is wonderful. You can show class. Obtain a job in another district where the culture does not allow this sort of behavior. If you find that the district supervisor is affecting your success in being hired elsewhere, then you will have to take steps. However, most of these people are satisfied with just running you out.

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Related Questions


Defamation of character stands for accusations of slander or libel or/and both.


Yes, a defamation of character is a tort. It' the same as Libel and slander.


Yes, libel (written statements tending to cause defamation of character) and slander (oral statements tending to cause defamation of character) are the two forms of defamation.


Libel and slander are the two main defamation of character torts.


Call it a verbal defamation of a person's character that is untrue.


Libel. Slander and libel are both forms of defamation. Slander is spoken defamation and libel is written defamation.


No, defamation and slander are civil suits and not subject to arrest or imprisonment.


Slander is something spoken about a real person. Defamation (or libel) is written.


In order to sue for defamation of character, you will have to prove that your reputation was damaged due to slander or libel. You will have to present your case in a court of law.


Slander and libel are both types of defamation. Slander is spoken defamation and libel is written defamation. Defamation is an unprivileged, false statement of fact that causes material or reputational harm to a person or business.


They are very close to the same thing, but both have to do with defamation of character. Slander is spoken defamation, and libel is written, whether it is in the newspaper, a billboard, or a public letter of some kind.


Defamation of character in print would be libel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libel_%28disambiguation%29



Generally speaking, slander is spoken and defamation is written. Recordings make the whole thing much more complicated though...


Defamation of character can include slander (spoken derogatory statements), libel (written derogatory statements) or both. To constitute actionable defamation, the statements must be false and expose a person to hatred, ridicule or contempt. You also can sue if the defamation harms you in your occupation. Follow these steps to start a legal action.


Traditionally Slander and Libel.


Your only legal action would be to take them to court in a civil suit for slander and defamation.


In a democratic country they can, but with in reason. For instance, there is slander, libel, defamation of character, and inciting a riot, etc.


- libel defamation - slander defamation - public nusicence - private nusicence - tresspassing on land - tresspasing on goods - tresspasing on a person - libel defamation - slander defamation - public nusicence - private nusicence - tresspassing on land - tresspasing on goods - tresspasing on a person


slander is when you SAY something false about someone and libel is when you write it


Defamation of Character is a legal term which describes libel and slander accusations.



Slander, defamation, tirade, censure, derision


Libel is a specific form of defamation. Libel, strictly speaking, refers to defamation in written form (as opposed to defamation in spoken form, which is called "slander").


No. "She wasn't a good fit, because all our other employees aren't total skanks or drugged-out thieves" would be slander or defamation of character. "She wasn't a good fit", full stop, is pretty neutral.



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