Can an attorney in fact under a power of attorney appoint someone in their stead to act on behalf of their relative when they cannot be there?

No. The principal is the person who appoints their own attorney in fact under a power of attorney. If their AIF cannot act for any reason the principal must appoint an alternate. An AIF cannot appoint an alternate AIF with all the original powers granted by the principal

The exception would be if in the original power of attorney document the principal granted the AIF the specific power to appoint an agent to act in his/her stead. For example, that power may be granted in a POA for a principal who owns property in another state. That would allow the AIF to appoint an agent to market the property in the other state and then if the property is sold the agent would send the deed of sale to the AIF for signing.

No. The principal is the person who appoints their own attorney in fact under a power of attorney. If their AIF cannot act for any reason the principal must appoint an alternate. An AIF cannot appoint an alternate AIF with all the original powers granted by the principal

The exception would be if in the original power of attorney document the principal granted the AIF the specific power to appoint an agent to act in his/her stead. For example, that power may be granted in a POA for a principal who owns property in another state. That would allow the AIF to appoint an agent to market the property in the other state and then if the property is sold the agent would send the deed of sale to the AIF for signing.

No. The principal is the person who appoints their own attorney in fact under a power of attorney. If their AIF cannot act for any reason the principal must appoint an alternate. An AIF cannot appoint an alternate AIF with all the original powers granted by the principal

The exception would be if in the original power of attorney document the principal granted the AIF the specific power to appoint an agent to act in his/her stead. For example, that power may be granted in a POA for a principal who owns property in another state. That would allow the AIF to appoint an agent to market the property in the other state and then if the property is sold the agent would send the deed of sale to the AIF for signing.

No. The principal is the person who appoints their own attorney in fact under a power of attorney. If their AIF cannot act for any reason the principal must appoint an alternate. An AIF cannot appoint an alternate AIF with all the original powers granted by the principal

The exception would be if in the original power of attorney document the principal granted the AIF the specific power to appoint an agent to act in his/her stead. For example, that power may be granted in a POA for a principal who owns property in another state. That would allow the AIF to appoint an agent to market the property in the other state and then if the property is sold the agent would send the deed of sale to the AIF for signing.

No. The principal is the person who appoints their own attorney in fact under a power of attorney. If their AIF cannot act for any reason the principal must appoint an alternate. An AIF cannot appoint an alternate AIF with all the original powers granted by the principal

The exception would be if in the original power of attorney document the principal granted the AIF the specific power to appoint an agent to act in his/her stead. For example, that power may be granted in a POA for a principal who owns property in another state. That would allow the AIF to appoint an agent to market the property in the other state and then if the property is sold the agent would send the deed of sale to the AIF for signing.