Java Programming
Windows XP

Can be used the programs in Java compiled under Windows XP with Windows 8.1?

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2016-08-05 07:18:43
2016-08-05 07:18:43

Java is portaable, all you need is to have the correct version of java installed.

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2016-01-20 16:24:02
2016-01-20 16:24:02

It should work, yes. It really doesn't matter where you compile it - if you compile under Windows XP, you don't compile FOR Windows XP; rather, you compile for the virtual machine, which is compatible in different environments.

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Related Questions


The task of the Java Virtual Machine is to run compiled programs.The task of the Java Virtual Machine is to run compiled programs.The task of the Java Virtual Machine is to run compiled programs.The task of the Java Virtual Machine is to run compiled programs.


How can I compile java programs using windows vista text pad?


When programs written in most other languages are compiled, they produce a platform-dependent executable that only runs on the same type of computer (i.e. 64-bit Windows or Intel Macs) it was compiled on.When a Java program is compiled, on the other hand, it produces a Java .class file that contains Java bytecode. That bytecode runs the same on almost all computer types because the Java virtual machine takes it and compiles it to platform-dependent code just before it runs.


Java source files have the .java extension, compiled Java class files have the .class extension.


A class file is a compiled .java file and cannot be executed without jdk or java. They are often executed with .bat files in windows for convenience


Yes you can but for that you must have have a Java Runtime Environment installed in your computer. Also if you are talking about programming in java then you need to install a Java SDK which can help you in executing your java code and run it. (It also contains Java Runtime Environment).


On the command line, type "java" followed by the filename of the compiled class, e.g.:java myClass.classOn the command line, type "java" followed by the filename of the compiled class, e.g.:java myClass.classOn the command line, type "java" followed by the filename of the compiled class, e.g.:java myClass.classOn the command line, type "java" followed by the filename of the compiled class, e.g.:java myClass.class


A JVM (Java Virtual Machine), which is a compiler for the compiled Java files, has to be installed on the machine where you want to run the Java program.A JVM (Java Virtual Machine), which is a compiler for the compiled Java files, has to be installed on the machine where you want to run the Java program.A JVM (Java Virtual Machine), which is a compiler for the compiled Java files, has to be installed on the machine where you want to run the Java program.A JVM (Java Virtual Machine), which is a compiler for the compiled Java files, has to be installed on the machine where you want to run the Java program.


Most Java objects seem to be 32KB and are located under your downloaded programs. If you double click on your "My Computer" icon then double click on "Local Disk (C:) " there you should find an area with a "Windows" folder double click on that and there should be a "Downloaded Programs" folder in which if you double click on that you will be able to then see your Java objects - OR - instead of going into the "Windows" folder you could double click on the "Programs" folder and there will be a "Java" folder in there (which ever you prefer).


The only time you need to have Java installed is if you want to run programs written in Java, or visit web pages with embedded Java applets.


That's because that's the way Java is designed. Java programs are compiled to be run on a special program that interprets it - the Java Virtual Machine. The reason it is designed this way is because it allows Java programs to run on just about any computer - despite the fact that different computers have different sets of machine instructions. It is well possible to write programs that run without requiring support of specific programs - but such programs will only run on specific computers.


Java is both compiled and interpreted. At first, the Java source code (in .java files) is compiled into the so-called Bytecode (.class files). The Bytecode is a pre-compiled, platform independent version of your program. The .class files can be used on any operating system. When the Java application is started, the Bytecode is interpreted by the Java Virtual Mashine. Because the Bytecode is pre-compiled, Java does not have the disadvantages of classical interpreted languages, like BASIC.



Deployment is the process of copying the compiled Java classes to a server or client. Once deployed, the server is able to run those classes (as in Java servlets), or serve those files to clients (as in Java applets), or be executed as programs (as in Java desktop applications).


Mac OS X has Java already installed. You do not need to download it and install it currently, and Java apps should have no problem running. It has to be a real java app, not a Windows exe file compiled that also uses java, that is still a Windows program. When Mac OS X 10.7 comes out, it will not have Java installed by default, and you have to install it manually just like you do on Windows.... just download the Mac version and install.


C, and C++, are compiled into "binaries" which target a specific operating system and CPU architecture. This means that those programs can not directly run on multiple operating systems. Windows programs will not run on Linux, nor will Linux programs run on Windows. The ability to run these programs on multiple operating systems is achieved through emulation or cross-compilation. It is usually said that such programs will run at least marginally faster than Java when running on their native platform, and will probably perform slower than Java when running through an emulation. Java, in comparison, is compiled into "bytecode", which is then compiled by a Virtual Machine to provide the best performance. Java uses just one binary that will run on all platforms that support that version of Java, albeit it will run marginally slower than C or C++, and will likely not have the same "look and feel" as the rest of the operating system. The advantage, however, is that no special care must be taken to write a program that runs equally well in Windows and Linux (and Mac, etc), so long as the developers stay away from a few system-dependent features (usually code that is called "native"). Even using "native" code will still allow developers to write a core that runs the majority of logic in the Virtual Machine, and then use native code to access special system features. In summary, Java runs on a number of platforms with a single compiled binary, while C++ requires a different compilation for each platform it is to run on.


That refers to the program that runs the compiled Java program.


Java source files have the .java extension, compiled Java class files have the .class extension.


Java is a computer programming language. Java programs can be interpreted (the computer compiles and runs the program as the code is executed) or it can be pre-compiled into bytecode (the computer doesn't have to compile it as soon as it is run, so time is saved.)


The main advantage is that C++ programs compile to native machine code and therefore execute many times faster than equivalent Java programs, which compile to byte code suitable for interpretation by the Java virtual machine. C++ is also more efficient since it requires no interpretation (and therefore no interpreter), and can use memory just as efficiently as assembler. The main disadvantage is the code must be compiled separately for each platform. With Java, programs need only be compiled once for any platform.


The general Java Runtime Environment allows a computer to run Java applets and compiled Java files.


the two types of java programs are Applet and application programs


Java. While Visual Basic is certainly useful for writing Windows applications, that's all it can do. If you want the same program to run on other platforms (such as Linux), the entire program must be re-written from scratch. With Java, there is no need to convert. Once compiled, Java programs can be executed upon any platform that has a suitable Java virtual machine implementation, which is pretty much everything today.


Any language that uses a compiler to generate the machine code is a compiled language. By contrast, interpreted languages generate the machine code at runtime. Some languages, like Java, are both compiled and interpreted; the source code is compiled to Java byte code which is then interpreted by the Java virtual machine at runtime.


To run Java programs, you only need to install the runtime (the Java Virtual Machine). If it is for running programs in a browser, most browsers already have this included, or suggest to download it when you access a Web page that uses Java. To write your own Java programs, you need the runtime (in the case of Windows, the java.exe program), and also the compiler (javac.exe in the case of Windows). However, it is better to download some IDE (for example, NetBeans), which includes everything you need, including editing tools, debugging tools, etc.



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