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Answered 2013-03-20 15:20:32

You need to review your court orders and the laws in your state. The custodial parent also supports the child. In some states the custodial parent has the legal right to claim the child. Massachusetts is one such state.



You need to review your court orders and the laws in your state. The custodial parent also supports the child. In some states the custodial parent has the legal right to claim the child. Massachusetts is one such state.

You need to review your court orders and the laws in your state. The custodial parent also supports the child. In some states the custodial parent has the legal right to claim the child. Massachusetts is one such state.

You need to review your court orders and the laws in your state. The custodial parent also supports the child. In some states the custodial parent has the legal right to claim the child. Massachusetts is one such state.
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Answered 2013-03-20 15:20:32

You need to review your court orders and the laws in your state. The custodial parent also supports the child. In some states the custodial parent has the legal right to claim the child. Massachusetts is one such state.

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I think u still have to pay since it is still your child


No, you can't stop paying the arrearage. You can file a motion to terminate current/future payments since the child is now married, but you will still owe the arrearage.


The father does, since the mother is paying her share towards the children in the form of child support.


A person can try to talk to another about paying child support. However, until the person is in the United States, nothing can be done.


The college expense is a gift unless addressed by the courts in the child support order. If she wants to stop paying the child support, she has to petition the court to get it approved. see link below


No, and he's not paying child support. He's giving gifts, since there's no order.AnswerChild support and visitation are two different and separate issues. Both should be governed by court order if the parents cannot come to an agreement that is kind and considerate of the needs of the CHILDREN. Paying child support through the courts is the best since the parent who pays gets credited with the amount paid. This may not happen otherwise.


No, since you are not taking care of the child anymore. Child support is not the same as support for you.


Since the child is a minor, they cannot file for child support. The custodial parent is the one who has to file for the child support for the child.


A child support order must be modified or terminated by the court that issued it. If the parties are unmarried the mother may wish to maintain the support order in effect (wisely) since the relationship appears to be unstable.


Child support is generally paid to the one who has the major part of the custody but when you split it more equal the one paying pays less since he then have the child more than earlier and therefor pay already while the child is in his custody. He has to apply for the child support to be reduced though based on the new custody agreement.


If you aren't married and the mother has obtained a child support order then you must continue to pay until that order has been modified. However, it would be very unwise for the mother to allow the order to be modified since unmarried relationships are unstable and fleeting and it is difficult to obtain a child support order. She should be especially wary since you want to stop paying child support and charge your children rent to live with you. That's not a good sign.If you aren't married and the mother has obtained a child support order then you must continue to pay until that order has been modified. However, it would be very unwise for the mother to allow the order to be modified since unmarried relationships are unstable and fleeting and it is difficult to obtain a child support order. She should be especially wary since you want to stop paying child support and charge your children rent to live with you. That's not a good sign.If you aren't married and the mother has obtained a child support order then you must continue to pay until that order has been modified. However, it would be very unwise for the mother to allow the order to be modified since unmarried relationships are unstable and fleeting and it is difficult to obtain a child support order. She should be especially wary since you want to stop paying child support and charge your children rent to live with you. That's not a good sign.If you aren't married and the mother has obtained a child support order then you must continue to pay until that order has been modified. However, it would be very unwise for the mother to allow the order to be modified since unmarried relationships are unstable and fleeting and it is difficult to obtain a child support order. She should be especially wary since you want to stop paying child support and charge your children rent to live with you. That's not a good sign.


In most cases child support stops once the child is 18 years of age or older. It also depends on the agreement you have with the court system. I suggest you find out the details of your agreement and ask a lawyer what your options are about child support since the child is a legal adult now. Just wanted to add that if you are paying in arrears then you will have to pay the support until ALL the back child support is paid off. Just because the child in question is of age, doesnt mean that you don't have to pay, I would recommend going back to your original support ORDER if you know where it is.


That depends on the child support orders. It is unusual for someone to have to be paying child support to a 26 year old child. But sometimes a judge will order the support to be paid until the child is out of college, or until a certain age. If your child support order did not order you to pay it beyond college or their current age, you don't have to pay it at all, unless it was ordered for another reason. If that is the case, then it has to be paid to the mother. But since I don't know the reason you are still having to pay it with your child being 26 years old, it's hard to give more of an answer. If the child support was in arrears, and you are now paying back child support, then yes, you still have to pay it to the mother. Other than these reasons, though, I don't see where you would be obligated to even pay it at all. If you are paying it by choice, and not by court order, then you can send it directly to your child.


You'd need to speak to an attorney in your state. If the financial situation has substantially changed since the support order was issued, you can go back to court and petition to have it modified.


If the main part of the custody has been moved to the other parent it's a good idea to look over the custody agreement and with that the child support and to who should get it. If it's just temporary the parents should be able to sort it out themselves. The support should go to the person the child lives with since it's for the child and especially if the child lives full time with one parent.


No. In most jurisdictions the amount of child support increases as the child grows older since expenses increase as a child ages.


Child support is determined by the number of children you have in your care and the financial situation of the parent that is paying child support. Since every person's financial situation is different the amount people have to pay for child support varies from case to case. There is no set amount. The only way you can find out how much you should receive is to go to court to sue your children's' other parent for child support. The court will them determine how much should be paid every month.


That is not likely since child support is based on the parents' income only. Your child support amount was calculated according to the Georgia child support guidelines. You can check those guidelines to see if a remarriage will result in any changes.That is not likely since child support is based on the parents' income only. Your child support amount was calculated according to the Georgia child support guidelines. You can check those guidelines to see if a remarriage will result in any changes.That is not likely since child support is based on the parents' income only. Your child support amount was calculated according to the Georgia child support guidelines. You can check those guidelines to see if a remarriage will result in any changes.That is not likely since child support is based on the parents' income only. Your child support amount was calculated according to the Georgia child support guidelines. You can check those guidelines to see if a remarriage will result in any changes.


Yes the child support can be revoked since the parent receiving support is no longer legally supporting the child


If he is paying child support he does have the right to see the child. You can get court ordered supervision if there are any issues in that area.


My wife and myself are separated and have been for15 years, we have 2 children over the age of 30. I am currently on disability and have been for 10 years. I have been paying back shild support since 1988. My current back child support is 17,000. Legally should I have to pay back child support when my kids are over the age of 21?


You have to petition the court again for custody but unless the situation has changed they will most likely keep it the way it is. And he is paying for the child since she lives with him.


The mother can apply to pay for her and her child. For the child to do so (if she's a teen mom for example) they will count to see how much income the household have first since she lives with her parent. You really need to ask a social worker since you leave very little details.


Legally you have to be 18 to enter into the armed forces of your own volition meaning you wouldn't have to pay child support since the child is 18, and child support stops at 18.



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