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2009-09-23 17:57:16
2009-09-23 17:57:16

A weakness of the Articles of Confederation

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By one definition a federal judge is one appointed under Article III of the US Constitution , appointed by the President and approved by the US Senate. These include the Supreme Court, the judges of the 13 circuit courts (a.k.a courts of appeal). and the US district court judges. There are other special judges in federal courts, such a magistrate judges and bankruptcy judges that are not appointed by the president and are not appointed for life.


They are appointed by the President.


The president appoints judges to the supreme court. But there are limits on how many, im not sure what those limits are.


The judges who are on the United States Courts of Appeals make the decisions. These judges are directly appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.


the president of the untied states of america


Yes. Federal judges are appointed by the President but must be confirmed by the Senate. Lower level federal judges, such as those presiding over US District Courts or US Bankruptcy Courts are often suggested by a Senator of the state in which the judge will serve and are nominated by the President as a matter of Senatorial courtesy.


Yes. Federal judges are appointed by the President but must be confirmed by the Senate. Lower level federal judges, such as those presiding over US District Courts or US Bankruptcy Courts are often suggested by a Senator of the state in which the judge will sit and are nominated by the President as a matter of Senatorial courtesy.


The President makes all appointments of judges and justices to the federal courts subject to confirmation by the Senate.


The president ,subject to confirmation , by the Senate appoints the first tier of federal judges. There are some lesser federal judges that the courts appoint.


Federal US District Court judges are appointed by the President but must be confirmed by the Senate. Judges presiding over US District Courts or US Special Courts are often suggested by a Senator of the state in which the judge will serve, and are nominated by the President as a matter of Senatorial courtesy.



The President nominates judges and justices to the following courts:Supreme Court of the United StatesUS Court of Appeals Circuit CourtsUS District CourtsUS Court of International TradeUS Bankruptcy CourtsUS Tax CourtUS Court of Federal ClaimsUS Territorial CourtsUS Court of Appeals for the Armed ForcesUS Court of Veterans AppealsWhile the President is actively involved in appointing appellate court judges and justices, he (or she) often nominates judges to lower courts and to Article I legislative courts (e.g., US Bankruptcy Courts, US Court of Federal Claims) at the suggestion of Senators in the President's own political party, as a matter of Senatorial courtesy.


No, the Supreme Court is separate from all other courts. The president nominates judges to federal courts and Congress approves them.


president reagan appointed conservative judges to federal courts


The judicial branch consists of judges and courts such as district courts (thus district judges), appeals court and judges and the highest court in the USA, the Supreme Court and the 9 justices.



In the U.S. Federal Courts, district court judges are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. With district judges, the President typically (but not always) follows the recommendation of the senior Senator of the state with the opening who is also from the President's party (if there is one).


Yes. In the United States, constitutional court (also called Article III courts) judges and justices are appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate. The constitutional courts are the US District Courts, US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts, US Court of International Trade, and the Supreme Court of the United States.


The President appoints federal appellate judges to the US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts. These appointments are subject to approval from the Senate.


Legislative Courts because they were created by congressional action. Judges in these courts, like their peers in other federal courts, are appointed for life terms by the president, with Senate approval.


He was unable to get judges approved for the courts by Congress.


No. The federal courts are part of the Judicial branch of government, which is co-equal to, and independent from, the Executive branch (the US President). The President has no authority over federal courts, except for having the power to nominate federal judges and US Supreme Court justices when vacancies arise during his term of office.The President has no authority whatsoever over state courts.


All federal judges are appointed by the President, at which point they must be confirmed by the Senate. Federal judges include Supreme Court Justices, of course, but they also include judges in federal district courts (trial courts), and the circuit courts of appeal (intermediate appellate courts, they hear appeals from the federal district courts, and appeals from these courts are heard by the Supreme Court - if the Supreme Court decides to take the case). Supreme Court justices are usually hand-picked by the president, with the help of some of his legal advisers. This is possible because there are only 9 of them, and vacancies on the Supreme Court are quite rare. Because there are hundreds of federal judges in lower courts across the country, the President has a less hands-on role in their selection, though he still officially appoints them. When there's a vacancy, recommendations for appointments usually come from the governor or a senator from the state in which the court is located, if that person is from the same political party as the president, and the president usually follows their recommendation. The procedure for appointing state court judges varies from state to state. In many states, judges are appointed by that state's governor, usually requiring confirmation from one or both houses of the state legislature. In other states, judges are elected.


The courts and the officers of the courts (lawyers, clerks, judges, and so forth) are all members of the judicial branch of government.



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