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Frogs

Do frogs have teeth?

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September 22, 2016 1:35AM

Yes, frogs have teeth. They are carnivores and, not only do they catch and eat insects, but they even catch tiny mammals such as bats, so they need teeth to help them grip larger prey. Frogs do not use their teeth for chewing, but for gripping the food.

Frogs' eyes actually push down into their heads to help with the swallowing process. They use the muscles attached to the roof of their mouth which also happens to be attached to the bottom of their eyes. Frogs do have teeth, however, not a full set. The frog does not chew it's food, so no back teeth are needed, but a couple teeth at the front are present, to hold it's prey in place. Actually, yes!

Most frogs do in fact have teeth of a sort.

They have a ridge of very small cone teeth around the upper edge of the jaw. These are called Maxillary Teeth.

Frogs often also have what are called Vomerine Teeth on the roof of their mouth.

They don't have anything that could be called teeth on their lower jaw, so they usually swallow their food whole. The so-called "teeth" are mainly used to hold the prey and keep it in place till they can get a good grip on it and squash their eyeballs down to swallow their meal.

Toads, however, do NOT have any teeth.