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Answered 2013-08-24 22:29:04

These formulae cannot represent substances having the same empirical formulae because the numbers of atoms of each element in the two formulae are different.

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C13H18O2 Is the empirical formula. It has the same molecular formula too.


In this case, the empirical formula and the molecular formula are the same and it is K3PO4.


In this instance, the empirical formula is the same as the formula unit: NaNO3


CCl4 is the molecular formula for carbon tetrachloride. It is the same as its empirical formula.


The empirical formula of calcium oxide is CaO, the same as the formula unit.


Yes, they have. Empirical Formula is the simplest formula of a compound. For both C7H14 and C10H20 the Empirical formula is CH2 .


Yes. In fact, many compounds can have the same empirical formula.


For sodium oxide, the empirical formula is the same as the formula unit, Na2O. (If any formula unit or molecular formula contains an atomic symbol with no following subscript, the empirical and actual formulas will be the same.)


Yes, it is possible for an empirical formula to be the same as the molecular formula. For example, Lactic acid's molecular formula is C3H6O3, which would make its empirical formula CH2O.



The molecular formula is the same as the empirical formula, NO2. The compound NO2 has a molar mass of 46g/mol, so the empirical and molecular formulas are the same.


C6H10OS2. Molecular and empirical are the same for Allicin.


A molecular formula is identical to the empirical formula, and is based on quantity of atoms of each type in the compound.The relationship between empirical and molecular formula is that the empirical formula is the simplest formula, and the molecular can be the same as the empirical, or some multiple of it. An example might be an empirical formula of C3H8. Its molecular formula may be C3H8 , C6H16, C9H24, etc. Looking at it the other way, if the molecular formula is C6H12O6, the empirical formula would be CH2O.


Empirical formula is a useless notion; important is the molecular formula.


The empirical formula for nitrogen dioxide is the same as its molecular formula - NO2. See related question below for more details on how to find empirical formulas.


An empirical formula may or may not be the same as a molecular formula. The empirical formula of a compound shows the smallest whole-number ratio of the atoms compound. The molecular formula tells the actual number of each kind of atom present in a molecule of the compound.


Silver oxide is an ionic compound so its molecular and empirical formula is same Ag2O


Yes. One of the simples examples is the pair butane and 2-methylpropane, which have not only the same empirical but the same molecular formula, C4H10.


For example, all linear alkenes with one double bond and no other functional groups have the same empirical formula.



The molecular formula of hexane is C6H14. The empirical formula is the same as the molecular formula after division of all subscripts in the molecular formula by the highest integer that produce an integer quotient from each subscript in the molecular formula. Therefore, the empirical formula of hexane is C3H7.


The same as its molecular formula; CH4. See related question below for more details on how to find empirical formulas.


Yes, it is possible.All isomers have the same empirical formula.


No. The empirical formula of a substance is the formula in which each atomic symbol has the lowest possible subscript that gives the correct ratio between atoms for the compound as a whole. For C6H12, the empirical formula is CH2, but for C6H14, the empirical formula is C3H7.


No, some times they are same. the molecule in which any type of atoms are in prime numbers (divisible by themselves only) then empirical and molecular formula are same as C12H22O11 and C3H7Cl



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