answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2009-12-02 19:20:27

General liability insurance does not provide property coverage, except for 3rd party claims alleging property damage due to the insureds' negligence.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Your Answer

Related Questions


Obtain third party prices from general product insurers here! Rated auto car group comparison of general liability insurance quotes and instant product liability insurance rates for women. Luxury employers accident liability insurance estimates in ins commerce and public liability insurance for business liability insurance


No. When you get liability insurance, you are basically getting insurance for everyone else on the road that you may cause damage to. It does nothing to protect you from theft, vandalism ect.


Public Liability and Property Damage insurance. Bascially liability insurance.


General liability refers to products completion and labor, while cargo is specific to transportation, such as hauling equipment or goods. The cargo insurance would kick in if there was damage to the goods in transit. General liability would cover goods in your warehouse or on the docks.


Contractors general liability insurance is based on one of two things, total receipts or payroll and cost of subcontractors. Contractors general liability insurance covers a company if their employees get hurt on the job or cause damage to a property while working.


General liability insurance typically covers a third party from putting a claim against a companies operations. Some of the things that can be covered are property damage and bodily injury.


Because some of the types of losses covered by General Liability Insurance are excluded. It does not cover you for discrimination or other illegal acts on the part of the employer. Read your General Liability policy and you will see it is for premises liability and property damage as well products completed and injury to your customers. Employment Practices Insurance covers liabilities that could arise from the way you hire and fire your own employees.


Commercial general liability is an insurance policy that protects a business against lawsuits that pertain to bodily injury and property damage that may have come from the business.


Bodily injury liability and property damage liability.


Your own liability insurance will never pay for the damage to your property or for your medical expenses. Your collision insurance pays for damage to your property, if it is your fault. Your Uninsured Motorist Insurance or Underinsured Motorist Insurance pays for damage to your property if caused by someone else who is uninsured or under-insured. Your liability insurance will pay for the damage to someone else's property or for someone else's medical expenses, if it is your fault. Someone else's liability insurance will pay for the damage to your property or for your medical expenses, if it is their fault.


Technically, there is no difference between the two, besides the fact that many of the public and product liability risks are often covered together under a general liability policy. These risks may include bodily injury or property damage caused by direct or indirect actions of the insured. You can read more about public liability insurance on the Bizcover website in related links


Propety Damage covers you if you damage someone elses property. Liability covers you in the event of a lawsuit.


Auto insurance coverages fall into some broad categories. They are, in general, Medical Payments, Collision, Comprehensive, Liability (Bodily Injury and Property Damage), Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist, Rental Car, and, if you live in a no-fault state, Personal Injury Protection (PIP). BODILY INJURY LIABILTY INSURANCE. All states require bodily injury liability insurance, except for Florida (a no-fault state) and New Hampshire. As of June 1, 2010, Wisconsin now also requires bodily injury liability insurance. PROPERTY DAMAGE LIABILITY INSURANCE. Property damage liability coverage addresses the costs of damages to the other driver's vehicle or property should you be involved and found at-fault for an auto accident. Commonly, property damage liability insurance also covers the damage caused by other authorized drivers of your vehicle. Currently, all states require property damage liability insurance.


Yes, you can get auto insurance that only covers liability and property damage. However, you will need to purchase collision insurance if there is a lien on your vehicle.


Property damage liability insurance is to cover the damage you may cause to someone else's property. Different states have different car insurance requirements and regulations. Further, some people get larger property liability insurance coverage than the minimum requirements.



Federally defined acts of terrorism which cause physical damage to your property.


No. Liability insurance covers damage you do to someone else's property. Theft would be covered by comprehensive insurance. In most jurisdictions, liability insurance is required but comprehensive is not.


NO, liability covers damage you do to someone else's property. Comprehensive insurance covers damage to your vehicle by someone else. If you have no comprehensive, then you will need to look to their insurance for recovery of damages.


No. Liability insurance will only cover your liability for property damage/injuries to others. In this case, it would cover the damage to the pole you hit. Your liability coverage will never cover damage to anything you own. You would need collision/comprehensive coverage to cover damage to your car.


No. That would come under comprehensive insurance.




This would be covered under your general liability policy for your business


Property damage liability car insurance will cover the individuals car and property that you hit. It will not cover anything to do with your vehicle if the accident is your fault.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.