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Does filing bankruptcy raise your credit score?

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Answered 2012-12-27 23:04:08

In some cases, it actually does. This really depends on a lot of factors and variables, but I have seen credit scores increase 100+ points after filing a bankruptcy.

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No, a credit score is compiled from a consumer's complete credit history.


Most likely, yes. One of the biggest effects that filing for bankruptcy has is on your credit. Bankruptcy will stay with your credit for roughly 10 years and because of that your score will decrease, at least initially.


No, filing bankruptcy will never help improve your credit score, it stays on your report 10 years whereas a repo or foreclosure normally remain 7 years. So bankruptcy would only make your credit worse.


The bankruptcy will still be reported on your credit file for up to ten years however, it will denote that the car loan was paid off. So to answer the question wil it raise your credit score. The answer is no.


The fact of filing bankruptcy is already going to lower your credit score, and the point of bankruptcy, part of it anyway, is to resolve unpayable debt such as collection accounts. It is in your best interest to add the collection accounts to your bankruptcy, but if you consult your BK attorney, he is likely to advise you of this. The bankruptcy is the first next step in repairing your credit and improving your credit score.


will bankruptcy increase you credit score over time


There is no set credit score that everyone is assigned after filing bankruptcy. How much your credit score drops depends on a lot of factors, including how many debts you discharged, what your score was before you filed, how many secured debts you reaffirmed, and what type of debts were discharged. Hope this helps!


Credit scores are based on the consumer's overall credit history. Needless to say bankruptcy has a very negative impact upon one's score and will continue to do so for the ten years it remains on a CR, and perhaps much longer.


Whether you are filing Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy, your credit score will be directly impacted for 7-10 years AFTER you exit protection.


Yes, as long as the bankruptcy has been discharged, your credit score is 580+, and you earn enough income to support the additional loan.


As with everything, bankruptcy law can be complicated and the manner by which credit ratings occur can seem mysterious at best. Filing for bankruptcy will in general lower your credit score, but with some good spending habits and good financial stewardship will again rise over time, especially since part of your credit score has to do with income to debt ratio. When you file for bankruptcy, the debts do not simply disappear as if they never existed. Your history of late or missed payments, if you have one, will remain on your credit report and will continue to drag down your credit score. Additionally, the bankruptcy will stay on your record for many years. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for 10 years from the date of the filing


It will only affect the non-filing spouse if the couple apply for some type of joint credit, such as a home mortgage. It will not affect the new spouse's credit report/score.


Your credit score starts going up the minute the bankruptcy is filed. Debts incurred after the filing (even the day after), are exempt from the bankruptcy. If you make house and/or car payments on time, your score goes up Legally, they can hold it for up to 10 years.


Your credit rating after bankruptcy is based on a number of factors. Many people are consider a good credit risk after bankruptcy if they have no debt and a job. Visit my web site for an article on rebuilding credit after bankruptcy: http://www.chs-law.com/2005/05/rebuilding-credit-after-bankruptcy.HTML.AnswerMy score raised from 530 to 572 when I received my chapter 7 dicharge.


If you are surrendering your house anyways, it is usually better for your credit score if you do it through bankruptcy. If your house is foreclosed on before you file bankruptcy, then your credit score is hit by both the foreclosure and the bankruptcy. If you let your house go back through bankruptcy, instead, then your credit score is only hit by a bankruptcy.


When looking to rebuild credit score after a bankruptcy, there are many different options you can consider. One of the best ways is to show responsibility in using a prepaid credit card. This way you will be able to show that you can make regular payments to cover the things you will need to purchase on a monthly basis.


The most important factor in a credit score is paying one's bills on time. Any late payment lowers the credit score, but a higher ratio of on-time payments will raise it. Paying down some debt will also raise the ratio of available credit and raise the credit score.


bankruptcy will effect for your credit for an average of 7 years..consider it a way of purging the bad and being flagged for "high risk" until your prove yourself again


No, just the opposite. Bankruptcy is the ultimate "train wreck" of a person's financial standing. Even after the ten year SOL there will be a public record, and the consumer will still be penalized for it. Bankruptcy, is not, as some are led to believe, the magic cure for debt problems.


After a person files bankruptcy, one must raise their credit score high enough to obtain a credit card. Once this is done, the process is simple and all a person must do is to fill out the normal paperwork.


Late payment will drive your credit score into the ground rapidly. Many people question filing a Bankruptcy even though their credit is shot through late payments on mortgages and other bills. Filing Bankruptcy put all collection activity on hold and your accounts show current and up to date as long as you make your payments on time. Most people are surprised tofine their credit in much better shape after a BK than before with a much higher credit score Late payments can always be corrected, and this will be reflected on your credit file. Bankruptcy, however, will stay on your credit file for six years.


There is not a specific score that your credit drops to after a bankruptcy. Your credit doesn't only depend on that one thing, but the rest of your credit history as well, and sometimes it will go up on certain credit reports since now you will compared to other people with bankruptcies on their record, instead of other people without. See the related links for more information.


If you give grantsgov $490 to raise your credit score, you will lose the money and your credit score will not be raised.


A bankruptcy stays on your credit report for 10 years and you may have to answer about it for the rest of your life. Who knows what effect it has on your credit score? Companies that lend money. Only when you apply for credit after bankruptcy will you know the full detrimental effect.


One's credit score is in a constant state of flux because any change in the credit report results in the bureau automatically recalculating your credit score. In general, assuming that one is not actively looking for new credit, is paying off their existing credit lines on time, is not growing balances and is not filing for bankruptcy, your score will change in a minor way every two-to-three (2-3) months.



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