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Declaration of Independence

Does the Declaration of Independence govern like the founding fathers would have wanted in the present day?

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2010-11-17 21:30:49
2010-11-17 21:30:49

The Declaration of Independence did not establish any form of government.

You are thinking of the Constitution.

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The first of the constitution was called the preamble and was about the purpose of the constitution, the philosiphy of it, and was our founding fathers expected of the U.S. to be in the present and the future.

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Technically, no. Lincoln was not a Founder. Rather, the Founding Fathers were those were present for the making of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and those who shaped the country as it was being formed. Lincoln's legacy in history is as the Savior and Protector of the Union, but not as a Founding Father.

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There are no motifs (intentional at least) present in the Declaration of Independence.

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Yes, it was and all the delegates present signed it.

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i don't recall that singers were present at the signing of the declaration of independence

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Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. They were both abroad in Europe at the time.

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The Declaration of Independence was written in 1776 ... it's 236 years old (as of 2012.) It was hand written with black ink on paper that has aged to a light brownish tan color. At present, it is preserved in Independence Hall (Philadelphia.)

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John Adams, Patrick Henry, and Thomas Jefferson were a few of the important Founding Fathers who weren't present at the Constitutional Convention. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were overseas, and Patrick Henry refused to attend because he "smelt a rat" and didn't trust the intentions of his fellow delegates.

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Perhaps surprisingly, George Washington was not one of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence. He wasn't able to be present during the signing because of official duties in the Colonial Army.

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No. He was, however, present at the signing of the declaration of independence. He was invited by Worshipful Brother George Washington to the signing. Prince Hall was Most Worshipful Grand Master of Coloured Freemasons at the time.

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The Declaration of Independence was written in response to taxation imposed by the English Parliament without the colonies having a representative present. Taxes on tea, the Stamp Act, and the Intolerable Acts are some of the major issues that inspired the response.

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The word 'founding' is the present participle, present tense of the verb to found. The present participle also functions as an adjective and a verbal noun (gerund). Examples:We're founding a scholarship fund with the proceeds from the lawsuit. (verb)She was a founding member of the organization. (adjective)He was credited with founding the company. (noun)

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There could have been, but history doesn't record or tell us if there was.

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Thomas Jefferson was not present at the First Consititutional Congress, where the present day United States Constitution was drafted and written, he was in Paris. He is credited for being the main author of the Declaration of Independence

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The Declaration of IndependenceThe Declaration of Independence was written in the summer of 1776 primarily by Thomas Jefferson, agreed upon on July 2 by the Second Continental Congress, sent to the printer on July 4, and all signatures were collected in the following weeks. Because not all delegates were present in Philadelphia at that time, the signing of the document took some time to complete. Most agree on the date August 2 as the official completion.

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Benjamin Franklin was a delegate from the state of Pennsylvania. Franklin was present at the Constitution Convention from May 28th through the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

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No. Details present in the Investment Declaration form will be present in the Form 16 document

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Daniel Carroll was present at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and is considered one of the Founding Fathers. He signed both the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, one of only five men to do so.

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The US Constitution is the document that created the present government of the United States of America. It has the force of law and is the supreme law of the land. The Declaration of Independence is an open letter to the world announcing that the former colonies now considered themselves independent from the rule of Great Britain and giving the reasons for it. It has no force of law at all.

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The final category is Documents The clue was" It says, The history of the present king of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and Usurpations The answer is What is the Declaration of Independence

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The Founding Fathers were a group of well-educated men who led America in the early stages of her history. These men risked their lives for the freedom of Americans. This began with achieving independence of the thirteen colonies from England, and continued with the formation of a government for the new nation once the Revolutionary War had been won.As for specific people, the 7 Founding Fathers included: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, Alexandra Hamilton, John Hancock and Benjamin Franklin.If one considers any of the people who participated in the forming of this Republic or of evicting the King to be "Founding Fathers," then naturally the Framers of the Constitution are a subset of the Founders, since they gave us the format and structure for the Republic. Of course, the number who might be deemed Founding Fathers would be larger than the list of Framers, a case in point being Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, who were not present at the writing of the Constitution, but were surely Founding Fathers.Men that historians say were influential include:Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, John Hancock, Thomas Paine, Roger Sherman, John Jay, James Wilson, and Governor Morris. It would be impossible to construct a list which would be accepted by all historians.George Washington , Thomas Jefferson , Nathan Hale , Benjamin Franklin , Samuel Adams , John Adams

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Because the "HE" refers to all mankind in relation to the point of the declaration of independence While no name is given to the "He" in the Declaration, there is a clear reference back to the "present King of Great Britain" at the end of the second paragraph. Therefore, "He" clearly specifically means King George III. That still does not answer why the Declaration did not say King George III or the present King of Great Britain, George III or something using his actual name. Most likely it was out of the civility that prevailed at the time. In my opinion, referring to the King by name, would have made the issue very personal and the revolution was business, not personal.

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Ben Franklin was one of the original five drafters of the US Declaration of Independence. 56 delegates (including Ben Franklin), representing the 13 states of America, signed the declaration, most of them signing it on August 2, 1776, but some representatives were not present and added their names later. It would therefore seem most likely that Ben Franklin signed it with his colleagues on August 2, 1776. For more details about the Declaration, see Related Links below this box.

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The final category is Documents The clue was" It says, The history of the present king of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and Usurpations The answer is What is the Declaration of Independence


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