Founding Fathers

The core group of individuals who created the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and fought the American Revolution is known as the Founding Fathers. They are credited with the establishment of the United States as it is today.

Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, US Constitution

What state did not send delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787?

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Rhode Island. The State's leaders refused to participate in the Constitutional Convention because they believed it was a conspiracy to overthrow the current government, which was operating under the Articles of Convention. Patrick Henry, who would have been their delegate, declared he "smelt a rat," and didn't want to participate in a project that threatened state sovereignty.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, US Constitution

Which Founding Fathers signed the Constitution?

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George WASHINGTON, President New Hampshire: JOHN LANGDON, NICHOLAS GILMAN Massachusetts: NATHANIEL GORHAM, RUFUS KING Connecticut: WM. SAML. JOHNSON, ROGER SHERMAN New York: ALEXANDER HAMILTON New Jersey: WIL. LIVINGSTON, DAVID BREARLEY, WM. PATERSON, JONA. DAYTON Pennsylvania: B. FRANKLIN, THOMAS MIFFLIN, ROBT MORRIS, GEO. CLYMER, THOS. FITZSIMONS, JARED INGERSOLL, JAMES WILSON, GOUV MORRIS Delaware: GEO. READ, GUNNING BEDFORD jun, JOHN DICKINSON, RICHARD BASSETT, JACO. BROOM Maryland: JAMES MCHENRY, DAN OF ST THOS. JENIFER, DANL CARROLL Virginia: JOHN BLAIR, JAMES MADISON jr North Carolina: WM. BLOUNT, RICHD. DOBBS SPAIGHT, HU WILLIAMSON South Carolina: J. RUTLEDGE, CHARLES COTESWORTH PINCKNEY, CHARLES PINCKNEY, PIERCE BUTLER Georgia: WILLIAM FEW, ABR BALDWIN
Asked in Founding Fathers, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence

Who was the main author of the Declaration of Independence?

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Although Thomas Jefferson is often credited as the sole writer of the document, the Declaration (1776) was a collaborative effort. Jefferson was the one responsible for writing both the first and final draft. However, he was actually part of a committee appointed by the Second Continental Congress to write it. The other four members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, all of whom provided recommendations on the language of the document. However, he was actually part of a committee appointed by the Second Continental Congress to write it. The other four members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, all of whom provided recommendations on the language of the document. The US Constitution had a much wider authorship, with various sections provided by many of the Founding Fathers. The various suggestions and clauses were merged into a first draft by a "Committee of Detail" consisting of: John Rutledge (SC) Edmund Randolph (VA) Nathaniel Gorham (MA) Oliver Ellsworth (CT) James Wilson (PA)
Asked in Founding Fathers, Politics and Government, US Constitution

What is the Elastic Clause?

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The elastic clause provides flexibility for our government. The elastic clause in the US Constitution grants Congress the right to pass all laws "necessary and proper" to carry out the powers specifically granted to Congress by the Constitution.
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Who were the Founding Fathers of The United States of America?

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The Founding Fathers were a group of well-educated men who led America in the early stages of her history. These men risked their lives for the freedom of Americans. This began with achieving independence of the thirteen colonies from England, and continued with the formation of a government for the new nation once the Revolutionary War had been won. As for specific people, the 7 Founding Fathers included: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, Alexandra Hamilton, John Hancock and Benjamin Franklin. If one considers any of the people who participated in the forming of this Republic or of evicting the King to be "Founding Fathers," then naturally the Framers of the Constitution are a subset of the Founders, since they gave us the format and structure for the Republic. Of course, the number who might be deemed Founding Fathers would be larger than the list of Framers, a case in point being Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, who were not present at the writing of the Constitution, but were surely Founding Fathers. Men that historians say were influential include: Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, John Hancock, Thomas Paine, Roger Sherman, John Jay, James Wilson, and Governor Morris. It would be impossible to construct a list which would be accepted by all historians. George Washington , Thomas Jefferson , Nathan Hale , Benjamin Franklin , Samuel Adams , John Adams
Asked in Founding Fathers, US Constitution, Federalist Papers

Who were the authors of the Federalist Papers?

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There were three authors of the Federalist Papers. James Madison (28 papers: 10, 14, 37-58 and 62-63) and Alexander Hamilton (52 papers: 1, 6-9, 11-13, 15-36, 59-61, and 65-85) wrote most of the Federalist Papers, but John Jay wrote papers 2-5 (Foreign Affairs) and 64 (on the Senate). All of the essays were signed Publius and the actual authors of some are under dispute, but the general consensus is that Alexander Hamilton wrote 52, James Madison wrote 28, and John Jay contributed the remaining five. In total, the Federalist Papers consist of 85 essays outlining how this new government would operate and why this type of government was the best choice for the United States of America. The Federalist Papers remain today as an excellent reference for anyone who wants to understand the U.S. Constitution.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, US Constitution

Who wrote the US Constitution?

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A man named Governor Morris of Pennsylvania was in charge of the committee to draft the final copy of the Constitution. Other men who had much to do with writing the Constitution included John Dickinson, Governor Morris, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Thomas Paine, Edmund Randolph, James Madison, Roger Sherman, James Wilson, and George Wythe. Morris was given the task of putting all the convention's resolutions and decisions into polished form. Morris actually "wrote" the Constitution. The original copy of the document is preserved in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C. Jacob Shallus who, at the time, was assistant clerk of the Pennsylvania State Assembly, and whose office was in the same building in which the Convention was held, was given the task of engrossing the Constitution prior to its being signed. Here is more input from other WikiAnswers contributors: The U.S. Constitution is the work of several men, directly and indirectly. The three most notable persons whose work influenced the Constitution but who were not involved in its writing are Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Thomas Paine. The group of men involved in the writing of the Constitution are generally referred to as the "framers". No single individual wrote it. Twelve of the thirteen states sent delegates to the Constitutional Convention to revise the Articles of Confederation and the entire convention worked on it. After the political questions were hashed out a 'committee of style' was formed to put the ideas into formal words. It is generally accepted that Governor Morris created most of the actual wording included in the final draft from the Committee of Style. The original copy of the document is preserved in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C. The person most associated with authoring the US Constitution was James Madison, the fourth President of the United States. Primary Author: James Madison (drafted the Virginia Plan). He is known as "The Father of the Constitution." James Madison wrote the Constitution in 1787. The constitution wasn't passed until 1788. The US Constitution was written by the members of the Constitutional Convention.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Declaration of Independence

Who was the main writer of the Declaration of Independence?

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Thomas Jefferson is often credited as the sole writer of the document, but the Declaration (1776) was a collaborative effort. Jefferson was the one responsible for writing both the first and final draft. However, he was actually part of a committee appointed by the Second Continental Congress to write it. The other four members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, all of whom provided recommendations on the language of the document. Thomas Jefferson was the main writer of the Declaration of Independence. The Draft of which was heavily edited by the Continental Congress can be seen in: Adrienne Koch and William Peden eds., The Life and Selected Writings of Thomas Jefferson (New York: Random House, 1944). Thomas Jefferson
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Were the Founding Fathers democratic reformers?

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The way this question is answered depends a great deal on what is understood by "democratic reformer." If the word "democratic" is given an extremely narrow definition, it is easy to say that the founding fathers were not democratic reformers. Their original intent was only to throw off the yoke of british rule. Looking back to pre-revolutionary America we see that the colonial governments were modeled after british limited monarchy, the colonies had assemblies, upper and lower houses, and while they did not have a king they had a governor who was chosen directly by the king so as to be an extension of the kings will in the colonies. We must assume that even during the revolution the founding fathers had no designs of a democracy and even after the revolution some might hesitate to call the government formed a democracy because it lacked a strong central government. In fact, the articles of confederation were modeled more after the grecian city-states which were republican governments. One might argue that it is irrelevant to the concept of democracy whether the central government is weak or strong; by this argument, Switzerland is the least democratic country in the world and absulute dictatorships are more democratic since they are centralized. In addition these remarks really only apply to the actions of the founding fathers prior to the Constitution of 1787 since that Constitution created a stronger central government although it retained a monarch-like figure in the position of President. The founding generation were democratic reformers in many ways, and were really seen as radical during their time. They did receive a lot of their ideas of democracy from the Enlightenment writers, such as Locke, Voltaire,and Rousseau. Nevertheless, many of the founders were rather reserved on giving democratic power and say in the government to the common man, being uncertain that the country would be able to remain stable and orderly if such was the case.
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What was the Attitude of founding fathers toward political parties?

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Washington was against them. His reasoning was that the political party would take over and the "good of the people" would be forgotten. He has a point if you look at what has happened 2 hundred years later. Washington and the founding fathers felt that a man should serve his country for a brief period of time to help the people and then go home to his business/plantation leaving the job to new people. They never foresaw the professional congress person.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin

Was Benjamin Franklin a physicist?

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Yes he basically wrote many theories on electricity. So he was a physicist
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of Ireland

Who is the founder of the Irish Times?

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The founder of the Irish Times was Major Lawrence Knox.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Definitions

What does despise mean?

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Despise means to hate someone. More precisely and accurately, it means to look down upon with contempt or to regard as negligible or worthless (according to Merriam-Webster). It's a synonym of hate, but synonyms aren't definitions. (In this case, it's also important to ask yourself, "What does hate mean?" The American pop culture has overused "to hate" to the point where very few really know the full sense of its meaning.) After all, it is quite possible to despise a person's behavior without hating the person.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, US Constitution, Bill of Rights

What can accurately be said of the Bill of Rights?

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That they are the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, ratified in 1791. The Bill was drafted by James Madison, a Federalist who would become the fourth US President. Madison drew mainly on English law in writing the amendments, but his sources were many, including earlier Colonial documents. The Bill was designed to appease anti-Federalists who believed the Constitution granted too many rights to the federal government. The Bill of Rights defines and protects individual rights, such as freedom of speech, the press, religion (the First Amendment), and the Second, the right to bear arms, while limiting the power of the federal government to curtail or deny these rights. The Third Amendment, covering quartering of soldiers, was a necessary piece of legislation at the time of ratification, but it is and will remain insignificant as long as the US is not occupied by an opposing army. Amendments 4-8, the so-called "Judicial amendments" protect the rights of individuals suspected of or accused of a crime. They also outline the functions of criminal courts. The importance of the protection they grant cannot be overstated. Amendment 4 covers protection from search and seizure; the 5th guarantees due process and grand juries, and guarantees against double jeopardy and self-incrimination. The Sixth Amendment concerns speedy, impartial trials; trial by jury, the right to confront witnesses and the right to an attorney. Amendment 7 covers jury trials in Federal cases, and the 8th Amendment forbids excessive bail, fines, and cruel and unusual punishment. The Ninth Amendment was smart and forward-thinking, although it may sound dull when read. It protects individual rights that are not covered by the Constitution, which includes the right to privacy in issues that did not exist 200 years ago. Reproductive rights cases have been argued and won on the Ninth Amendment. Finally, the Tenth, or "States' Rights" amendment specifically says that the Federal Government has no rights other than those outlined in the Constitution. So simple a statement leads to numerous forms of interpretation. Those whose interpretation is broad regard the rights of individual states to be on a par wih the federal governments'. Wikipedia presents a comprehensive explanation of the 10th Amendment, a lengthy list of categories under which it has been challenged, and detailed examples of cases that fall under those categories and their outcomes.
Asked in Founding Fathers, US Presidents, Thomas Jefferson

What was Thomas Jefferson's childhood like?

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His first memory was horseback riding with a slave into the Virginia wildness at the age of three. He was born on his father's plantation called Shadwell. He was the third of ten children. At the age of five he learned to read, write and do arithmetic from a private tutor. At age 9 he was placed in a classical school under Reverend William Douglas. He also took to hunting at an early age, but his love of nature overcame this hobby and he soon disliked it. In 1758 he was sent to a school under Reverend James Maury and at age 14 his father died. In 1760, at the age of 17, he entered the College of William and Mary. He eventually learned to speak 6 languages. As a young child Thomas Jefferson was an enthusiastic student, often spending up to fifteen hours a day studying. He was to retain a life long interest in reading. He had both a keen intellect and also a wide range of interests. His interests ranged from philosophy and architecture to the natural sciences. At the age of 17 he entered the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, two years later he graduated with the highest honors. After leaving college he studied law under George Wythe and later served in the Virginia House of Burgess.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States

Why did Hamilton and burr hate each other?

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Burr believed that Hamilton was the sole detriment to the rise of his political career, namely. Hamilton had intervened, for Jefferson, in the nasty election of 1800, and had also intervened in the race for the governor of New York later. Both times, Hamilton had ruined Burr's chances. This animosity led Burr to kill Hamilton in 1804.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, US Constitution

When was the U.S. Constitution signed?

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It was signed on by the delegates to the Constitutional Convention, meeting in Philadelphia, on September 17, 1787. Contrast this with the signing of the Articles of Confederation, the prior constitution of the United States. It was first signed on July 9, 1778, but due to a number of objections by the states (particularly over the status of the western territories), signing was not completed until March 1, 1781. However that is not the date that the United States was actually established; in other words, the Constitution did not take effect on that date. Technically, and according to its own stipulation, it took effect when it was signed by the ninth state to ratify it: New Hampshire. That happened June 21, 1788. The date mentioned above, September 17, 1787, is when the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia agreed on the final draft of the Constitution and sent it to Congress with the recommendation that it be sent to the states for ratification.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Parts of Speech

What part of speech is looked?

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Looked is a verb. It's the past tense of look.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, US Constitution

What was the Great Compromise at the Constitutional Convention and what problem did it solve?

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Delegate Roger Sherman introduced the Great Compromise to resolve a dispute between larger (higher population) states and smaller states to ensure fair representation in Congress by reconciling plans originating in Virginia and New Jersey. Sherman's compromise, also known as the Connecticut Compromise, combined ideas of the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan at the Constitutional Convention. This Compromise created a bicameral (two house) legislature that had a lower house with representation based on population, to be calculated by census count every ten years (Virginia Plan), and an upper house based on equal representation of two Senators each, without respect to population (New Jersey Plan). The Upper House later became known as the US Senate, and the Lower House, the US House of Representatives. The agreement also provided that all bills regarding taxes be initiated in the Lower House. Apportionment by population protected the citizens' interests; equal representation preserved the balance of power between states. The Great Compromised passed after eleven days of deliberation, but didn't completely satisfy the southern states, whose population consisted largely of slaves who weren't considered citizens. This issue was addressed by the Three-Fifths Compromise, which allowed the census to count each slave as three-fifths of a person for the purpose of apportionment of Representatives in the House.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence

What were Thomas Jefferson's views on slavery?

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Jefferson's views on slavery were contradictory: On one hand, Jefferson was morally opposed to slavery. He felt it was evil and wrong. His original draft of the Declaration of Independence condemned it in no uncertain terms. As Governor of Virginia, he proposed legislation to abolish it. On the other hand, despite his moral opposition though, he owned a significant number of slaves and even fathered children with one of his slaves, Sally Hemmings.
Asked in Founding Fathers

When writing the pledge of allegiance do you underline it?

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No. If referencing it in a paper you will put it in quotes as you do a poem.
Asked in Founding Fathers, US Constitution, Washington DC

What kind of district Colombia have?

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The District of Columbia is the capitol of the United States of America.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, Declaration of Independence

Who signed the Declaration of Independence?

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The 56 signatories of the Declaration of Independence were: Connecticut (4): Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott Delaware (3): Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean Georgia (3): Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton Maryland (4): Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton Massachusetts (5): John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry New Hampshire (3): Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton New Jersey (5): Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark New York (4): William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris North Carolina (3): William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn Pennsylvania (9): Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross Rhode Island (2): Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery South Carolina (4): Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward Jr., Thomas Lynch Jr., Arthur Middleton Virginia (7): George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton Delaware • George Read • Caesar Rodney • Thomas McKean Pennsylvania • George Clymer • Benjamin Franklin • Robert Morris • John Morton • Benjamin Rush • George Ross • James Smith • James Wilson • George Taylor Massachusetts • John Adams • Samuel Adams • John Hancock • Robert Treat Paine • Elbridge Gerry New Hampshire • Josiah Bartlett • William Whipple • Matthew Thornton Rhode Island • Stephen Hopkins • William Ellery New York • Lewis Morris • Philip Livingston • Francis Lewis • William Floyd Georgia • Button Gwinnett • Lyman Hall • George Walton Virginia • Richard Henry Lee • Francis Lightfoot Lee • Carter Braxton • Benjamin Harrison • Thomas Jefferson • George Wythe • Thomas Nelson, Jr. North Carolina • William Hooper • John Penn • Joseph Hewes South Carolina • Edward Rutledge • Arthur Middleton • Thomas Lynch, Jr. • Thomas Heyward, Jr. New Jersey • Abraham Clark • John Hart • Francis Hopkinson • Richard Stockton • John Witherspoon Connecticut • Samuel Huntington • Roger Sherman • William Williams • Oliver Wolcott Maryland • Charles Carroll • Samuel Chase • Thomas Stone • William Paca Samuel adams
Asked in Founding Fathers, US Constitution, US Supreme Court

Why did William Marbury lose his case?

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William Marbury didn't exactly lose his case; he was told the Supreme Court couldn't issue the requested court order because they determined they didn't have proper jurisdiction to hear his case at trial. According to Chief Justice Marshall, Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789, which empowered the Court to issue a writ of mandamus (court order compelling an official to take action) was unconstitutional because issuing writs of mandamus against government officials wasn't part of the Court's original (trial) jurisdiction in the US Constitution. Marshall decided they couldn't issue the writ, despite the fact that Marbury was entitled to receive it. This wasn't really a loss for Marbury, because Marshall didn't find in favor of either party. He said Marbury could file his case in the lower courts, then appeal to the Supreme Court, if necessary. Marbury dropped the case. Case Citation: Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)