Judaism

Forbidden food for Jews?

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2011-02-15 19:08:48
2011-02-15 19:08:48

Religious Jewish will not eat any food that is not kosher.

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It means "Jews Forbidden".

No, that is forbidden in Judaism.

No, that is forbidden. No one should do that.

Antisemetic decreases were imposed upon the Jews in Germany. They were forbidden to marry and forbidden to hold political offices.

It was one of the many ways in which the Nazis humiliated the Jews.

No. Pork is Treif, or forbidden for all Jews as they have interpreted God's word, although many (if not, most) Reform Jews don't exclusively eat kosher food and will eat pork products.

Jews are not forbidden from reading the Christian Bible. However, it's not something of interest to the majority of Jews.Orthodox answer:Actually, our Mishna (Jewish law) does forbid reading "outside books" (Sanhedrin ch.11).

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The Jews were put under many restrictions after the second revolt, but the most stringent restriction was that they were forbidden to live in Jerusalem or to even enter the city. After the second Jewish revolt, Hadrian came down hard on the Jews. Their religion was forbidden, and their sacred scriptures burnt. The Jews were forbidden to enter the city of Jerusalem. Their land was renamed Palestina after the Philistines

Murder is forbidden (Exodus ch. 20).

No, that is a form of idolatry which is strictly forbidden in Judaism.

Sikhs can eat any meat. For Hindu's Beef is forbidden. For Muslims and Jews Pork is forbidden.

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This is because god made it forbidden for them

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Leviticus, chapter 11 has a list of all the unclean foods that were forbidden to the Jews. These foods Jesus did not eat because He followed the Law of God.

According to Christian sources, Jews were thenceforth forbidden to enter Jerusalem.

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