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How can you ask your doctor to prescribe Dextrostat for ADHD?

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Wiki User
2010-08-03 14:59:04
2010-08-03 14:59:04
Open your mouth and let the words come out!Dextrostat (d-amphetamine sulfate) is simply another brand name under which this amphetamine is marketed. Amphetamines are Schedule II (C-II) Controlled Substances - no refills in any state in the Union and quantity limitations usually of a 30-day supply or specific number of dosage units in many states. Dextrosat comes in a 10mg tablet; Dexedrine never did and still does not. Although ADD/ADHD often can call for higher than usual doses, the average dose of Dexedrine is about 15mg - one 5mg tablet three times daily or one Dexedrine 15mg time-realsed Spansules. I haven't written a script for Dexedrine in so long that I don't even think the time-release formulation is still available as the brand-nname product. It appears that manufacturers of Dextrostat might have introduced the 10mg tab the same way around the dosage unit limit that Xanax 2mg was and is. (2mg of Xanax is generally only required by patients with genuine Panic Disorder, w/ or w/o Agoraphobia. Generic dextroamphetamine tablets long have been available in 5mg and 10mg immediate release form.

THe amphetamines - especially absent Adderall - can be extremely dangerous. The only other member of the family (other than dextroamphetamine and amphetamine) marketed in the US is literally the last amphetamine left standing: methamphetamine HCl, once (and still) marketed here by Abbot Labs as Desoxyn and by what was then Burroughs-Wellcome as Methedrine. There were injectable dosage forms of Methedrine available that almost killed many people who received a "lift" out of the torpor of recovering from anaesthesia with a shot of Methedrine.

Much more so than Adderall will EVER be, Dextrostat and Dexedrine are subject to misuse, abuse and addiction, to say nothing of wholesale diversion if prescribed to adolescents.This has to do with the various d- and -dl-amphetamines salts in Adderall. Long story short, if too take more than you're supposed to, the nasty side effects residing in the dl- part of the molecule usually ensures patients won't make the same mistake twice.

Why in the world would I ask any doctor write for amphetamines on MY (s patient's) Narcolepsy is pretty damned rare. Occasionally we use Dexedrine in 5-15mg/day in order to augment multiple drug therapy in patients whose depression has been refractory to other pharmacological treatment. It can be a very safe drug and, to this day, a helpful drug to psychiatrists. However, this is one case where the feds are NOt overreacting. A competent neurologist or psychiatrist really is the only type of physician that I believe should write for Dexedrine or Dextrostat, even though all of us whose Controlled Substance prescriptive privilege has not been limited by the DEA!!

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