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2013-02-27 19:02:52
2013-02-27 19:02:52

The Jovian planets have much higher escape velocities.

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Jovian planets have a much stronger gravitational force due to their larger mass.


The terrestrial planets are less massive and therefore have less gravity. As a result, much of the lighter gases could escape, in the process of planet formation.


because their escape velocities are not sufficient to hold back the molecules of other constituents(ex. nitrogen oxygen etc.)


Air molecules do escape into space it depends on how heavy or hoe light they are. However, lighter molecules of air have greater velocities while heavy molecules of air has less velocities were gravity pulls the air downwards.


Each planet is a different size with unique densities and overall masses. These are the properties that influence the escape velocity. Generally, a more massive planet will have a higher escape velocity, more speed is required to leave the stronger gravitational field that comes with the higher mass. But size and density also have to be considered.


The rocky or terrestrial planets have less atmosphere (but more breathable atmosphere) than the gas giants have, for two reasons. First, they are smaller, and therefore have weaker gravitational fields, which makes it easier for gas to leak away into space, and secondly, they are closer to the sun and therefore hotter, and the additional heat causes gas to expand, thus also contributing to its escape into space.


The bigger planets have bigger atmospheres


I am not sure how probable this is; but here are some of the practical difficulties.The gian planets don't really have any surface where anybody can "set foot on". They are just gas giants; the gas goes way down. An astronaut might be able to set foot on a platform floating in the planet's atmosphere, but not on the planet's surface, since these gas giants have no surface.The gravity of these planets is very strong. On Jupiter, an astronaut would have trouble standing up, since his weight would be more than twice what he weighs on Earth. On Saturn, an astronaut would weigh even less than on Earth - but it would require a tremendous amount of energy to get such an astronaut back out from Saturn. Or any of the giant planets. Look up the "escape velocities" - squaring these velocities gives you an idea of the amount of energy required. For example, on Earth the escape velocity is 11.2 km/second - and escaping from Earth is already a considerable engineering challenge. Saturn's escape velocity is 35.5 km/second - meaning that in theory, it would take about ten times as much energy to escape from Saturn, than it takes to escape from Earth.


the planets have very strong gravitational pulls.


Yes. It is different for different planets etc. Escape velocity on earth is different than escape velocity on Jupiter.


Depending on their relative masses and velocities, the path of the smaller will be a circle, or more likely, an ellipse. An old model for this is to consider a canon mounted at the top of the globe. Firing a shell at moderate velocities, it will fall to Earth quite soon. At a much higher velocity it will have sufficient energy to make a circle round the globe. At higher velocities again, it will form an ellipse. Eventually we reach escape velocity, where the shell just continues on a giant ellipse - really, an escape.


The escape velocity is different for different planets, stars, or other objects. In the case of planet Earth, the escape velocity is 11.2 km/sec.


the suns gravitational pull pulls them toward it but the planets try to escape its gravity


Assuming there is no air resistance, if an object starts at a speed of 11.2 km/sec, it can escape the gravitational field of Earth. This "escape velocity" is different for different planets, moons, etc.Assuming there is no air resistance, if an object starts at a speed of 11.2 km/sec, it can escape the gravitational field of Earth. This "escape velocity" is different for different planets, moons, etc.Assuming there is no air resistance, if an object starts at a speed of 11.2 km/sec, it can escape the gravitational field of Earth. This "escape velocity" is different for different planets, moons, etc.Assuming there is no air resistance, if an object starts at a speed of 11.2 km/sec, it can escape the gravitational field of Earth. This "escape velocity" is different for different planets, moons, etc.


What is the Earth's escape velocity in km/sec



Mercury's gases escaped into space once


The escape velocity from a black hole is equivalent to the speed of light. This is why nothing can escape from a black hole - not even light.


Because the mass of the planet holds it down.


Eloise Eagle Eye ET - The Extra Terrestrial Exorsist : The Beginning Escape From The Planet of the Apes


Yes. Probes have already be sent to the Moon, and other planets; this requires a velocity very near the escape velocity from Earth. Other probes are leaving the Solar System, so they achieved the much higher escape velocity required to escape the attraction from the Sun.Yes. Probes have already be sent to the Moon, and other planets; this requires a velocity very near the escape velocity from Earth. Other probes are leaving the Solar System, so they achieved the much higher escape velocity required to escape the attraction from the Sun.Yes. Probes have already be sent to the Moon, and other planets; this requires a velocity very near the escape velocity from Earth. Other probes are leaving the Solar System, so they achieved the much higher escape velocity required to escape the attraction from the Sun.Yes. Probes have already be sent to the Moon, and other planets; this requires a velocity very near the escape velocity from Earth. Other probes are leaving the Solar System, so they achieved the much higher escape velocity required to escape the attraction from the Sun.


to completely break away from a planet's gravitaional pull


Jupiter because it is the most massive of the planets in our solar system.


No, its depends on the planets gravitational pull


The sizes of the Sun and planets determine the strength of gravitational pull of the planets on each other and the Sun. The Sun's mass is so great that the planets can't escape from the Sun's pull and so as the planets are moving by the Sun pulls them back into orbit.



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