Painting and Staining
Turtles and Tortoises

How do you create the Faux Tortoise Shell look?

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2008-03-01 06:15:18
2008-03-01 06:15:18

I was looking up the same thing and I came across a way to do it but not sure if this will work for you. I figured if it works on a frame you might be able to use it in other ways.

Materials:

unfinished wooden frame

wood sealer

sandpaper

acrylic paints: bronze and two tones of gold

sponge

piece of poster board

black acrylic paint

water

brush

rubbing alcohol

eye dropper or spray bottle

Steps: # Coat the unfinished wood with wood sealer, and sand it down after it dries. # Use the sponge to apply patches of the bronze to different areas of the frame, and duplicate the same look on the poster board. Repeat this step with the two shades of gold until the piece and the poster board are completely covered with a camouflage pattern. # After the frame and the poster board have dried, make a wash by mixing black acrylic paint with water. # Paint a coat of the wash over the poster board, and while the wash is still wet, spread drops of the alcohol over it. If the wash is the correct consistency, tortoiseshell-like patterns will begin to appear around the areas surrounding the alcohol drops. If not, continue to experiment with different concentrations of the wash until the process produces the desired results. # Repeat Step 4 on the frame. If the results are not optimal, you can always wipe everything off and start over. Different patterns will appear depending on how the alcohol is applied over the wash. A spray bottle, for example, creates very small pattern, while an eye dropper makes a much larger pattern. Experiment to find the look you want.

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