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Answered 2011-04-11 15:51:53

Increase in potential energy = weight x increase in height

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Does speed 'effect' the gravitational potential energy of an object? No, but gravitational potential energy can be converted into kinetic energy - so the gravitational potential energy can effect the speed. Ep = mgh Energy Potential = mass * 9.81 (gravity) * height Speed / Velocity is absent from that equation.


Since potential energy is proportional to elevation, the potential energy of water gets less and less as it goes downhill.Its kinetic energy (based on velocity) may well increase, but the question asked about potential energy.


No, but there is energy related to gravity (gravitational potential energy).


Factors that affect potential energy are mass, height, and acceleration due to gravity. Factors that affect kinetic energy are mass and velocity.


Potential energy = mgh, or mass x gravity x height.Potential energy = mgh, or mass x gravity x height.Potential energy = mgh, or mass x gravity x height.Potential energy = mgh, or mass x gravity x height.


Water its self does not provide energy, however it can store some of the Suns energy, usefully in the form of potential energy (by virtue of its elevation in the gravity field of the planet).


gravitational potential energy arises from the law of gravity


PE = mgh (potential energy = mass x gravity x height).


No. Gravity is a force. Potential energy turns into kinetic (moving) energy when you fall due to gravity.


Mass, Height, and Gravity Gravitational Potential Energy= Mass * gravity * height


Potential energy refers to the energy stored in an object. An object has potential energy if it has height. An example that gives potential energy to an object is gravity.


It is both. The energy is being transferred from kinetic to potential. As the roller coaster climbs higher, the energy required to overcome the effect of gravity slows the coaster down, turning all the kinetic energy into potential energy.


Gravity is a force more so than an energy


Yes - gravitational potential energy is equal to mass x gravity x height.Yes - gravitational potential energy is equal to mass x gravity x height.Yes - gravitational potential energy is equal to mass x gravity x height.Yes - gravitational potential energy is equal to mass x gravity x height.


Potential energy is energy that is stored within an object, and this energy may do work. Gravity is what gives the potential energy to any object, and is a result of gravity pulling down


Yes, potential energy may be considered stored mechanical energy. The most common of potential energy that we deal with is gravitational potential energy. This energy matter has as a result of its elevation above its surroundings.


Compacted ice or glaciers glide under the effect of gravity to the lower potential energy zone.


Potential energy = mass * gravity * height Ep=mgh You should know the mass of the object and gravity as 9.81. So rearranging the formule Ep/mg=h. Potential energy / (mass * gravity) = height.


When an object is lifted from the ground, it has potential energy because of it's position.


I'm taking a physics final tomorrow, so i know this. Potential Engergy: (change in potential energy) =mgh (h is the change in the elevation)(m is mass)(g is gravity which is 9.81) Kinetic Energy: Energy =(1/2)mass x velocity(squared)



There is no "gravity kinetic energy". There is gravitational energy (a type of potential energy), and - separately - there is kinetic energy (the energy of movement).


the answer is that you have to have the good gravity.


True. It has "potential energy", in that gravity could be used to convert that "potential" energy into actual kinetic energy.


It depends on the mass of the object, the local value of acceleration of gravity, and the object's height above the elevation you're using for your zero-potential-energy reference level.



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