Politics and Government

How many electoral votes does the home state of the democratic candidate have?

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2008-11-04 14:53:59
2008-11-04 14:53:59

Since the 2008 Democratic Presidential candidate, Barack Obama, is from Illinois, his state has 21 electoral votes.

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By majority, if the candidate has most of Iowa's electoral votes lets say 21-20 then that candidate that had 21 got all the 41 electoral votes for that state.


A candidate receives electoral votes in any given state by being voted for by the voters


the candidate who receives the most popular votes in a state is credited with all that states electoral votes


Electoral votes in the US are the popular vote for each state combined into an electoral. Example - 50,000 people vote for a candidate in one state. 60,000 vote for the other candidate in the same state. The candidate with 60,000 voted in that states gets the electoral vote. Note. A state can have more electoral votes depending on population.


The amount of electoral votes a candidate will get in Virginia is decided by a primary ballot. Virginia is not a caucus state.


Richard Nixon was the Republican candidate and received 301 electoral votes. Hubert Humphrey was the Democratic candidate with 191 electoral votes. George Wallace was the American Independent Party candidate with 46 electoral votes.


Each state gets there own set number of electoral votes. If a candidate wins in that state, they get the electoral votes of that state.


The electoral college is based on the population of a state. If a majority of the state votes for a certain Candidate then the state wins all the Electoral votes which is all the Senates and Representatives.


Voters cast ballots for the President in an election. Each state has a number of electoral votes. When a candidate wins the popular vote for THAT state, they are awarded the electoral votes for that state. The candidate with the greatest number of electoral votes (not the greatest number of popular votes) is the winner of the election


The winner take all system means that all of electoral votes from a state go to the candidate who receives the majority of votes. It also means that electoral votes are not proportionally distributed, meaning that if a candidate gets 51% of citizens votes they receive 100% of the electoral votes.


Each state is entitled to a number of Electors equal to the number of the Repesentatives and Senators it is entitled to. Washington DC is given 3 electoral votes even though it has no Representatives or Senators. The total number of electors is 538, which is why 270 electoral votes are needed to win. The Electoral College is made up of men and women who are chosen by each state's political parties to be the electors for that party's candidate. Shortly after the national Republican and Democratic Conventions, when the actual candidate for each party is determined, the State Republican and Democratic Committees meet separately to choose their respective electors. New Jersey has 15 electoral votes. The State Republican Party has chosen 15 persons to be its electors and the State Democratic Committee has chosen its own 15 persons to be the Democratic electors. If the Republican candidate wins the popular vote in NJ, all 15 Republican electors get to cast their votes for their candidate. If the Democratic candidate wins, then all 15 of the Democratic electors get to cast their votes. The Electoral College does not meet in a single place at the same time the way Congress meets. Each state's electors meet within their own states to cast their votes. The electoral votes are then transmitted to Congress to be counted.


Harry Truman won the 1948 presidential election defeating Thomas Dewey. In the 1948 presidential election Democratic Party candidate Harry Truman received 303 electoral votes, Republican Party candidate Thomas Dewey received 189 electoral votes, and Dixiecrat Party candidate Strom Thurmond received 39 electoral votes. Progressive Party candidate Henry A. Wallace received popular votes for President, but no electoral votes.


President Reagan and Vice President Bush in 1984: 525 electoral votes (out of 538) Walter Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro got 10 votes from Mondale's home state of Minnesota and 3 votes from D.C., which has never cast a vote for a Presidential candidate who wasn't of the Democratic Party.


In U.S. Presidential elections, D.C. and every state except Nebraska and Maine gives 100% of their electoral votes to the candidate who gets the most popular votes within their state. In Nebraska and Maine, two electoral votes go to the candidate who gets the most popular votes within each state, and one electoral vote goes to the candidate who gets the most popular votes in each of the states' congressional districts.


The public votes to select who the Electoral delegates will vote for. In most states, state law dictates that the Electoral delegates must vote for the candidate who won their state's election. At least one state awards Electoral votes to the candidate who wins each Congressional district.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


It is possible that a candidate could win the "national" popular vote total but lose the electoral vote total. However, the electoral vote of every state accurately reflects the popular vote within that state. A candidate could win the electoral votes in a large state such as California winning the state by a huge margin. However, the opposing candidate could win the electoral votes in other states because a majority of the voters in those states vote for the opposing candidate.


How a state allocates its electoral votes is up to that state. Most states allocate all electoral votes to the candidate with more votes than any other candidate in that state; this is called a plurality. Note, however, that some states require the electors to cast their ballots in the Electoral College for the winner of the popular vote, but others have no such requirement.


People vote for a candidate. Each state has a given number of electoral votes. Win the state, get the votes from that state. Get more votes than your opponent, and you have been elected.


If a presidential candidate wins a state by recieving more state votes then he will get all of the electoral votes for that state.


The electoral college from each state. Each states gets the same amount of votes as how many representatives they have and senators they have. California, for example, has 53 representatives and so it gets 55 electoral votes with its two senators. the people voting is a winner take-all system. When the people's votes are tallied the state gives all its electoral votes to the candidate the people choose. So if the majority of the people in California vote democrat then the democratic party gets 55 electoral votes. Whichever candidate gets at least one more than half the total electoral votes possible becomes president.


Donald Trump won Alabama's 9 electoral votes in the 2016 election. The popular vote count was Republican candidate Donald Trump 1,318,255 and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton 729,547.


10 electoral votes - 1 for each district and 1 for each Senator Maryland has ten electoral votes, but unfortunately little say in which candidate receives them. In 2007 the state of Maryland became the first state in the union to 'drop out' of the electoral college. All ten votes go to the candidate receiving the most popular vote in the union.


A president is elected by getting 270 or more electoral votes from the electoral college. To get electoral votes the candidate must win the majoraty of the public in a certain state. The number of votes they get depends upon how many people are in the state, like Virginia has 13 and California gets 55.



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