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Answered 2006-06-17 16:00:24

Assuming your silver proof quarter does not have any visible nicks or scratches, it is worth $3-$4 -- otherwise it's worth about $1 (Deleted my previous update. Since the S mint mark only appears on proof coins this could not be a circulation strike. The first answer above is correct as it stands.)

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August 1, 2009 The US Mint has not issued a quarter with an "M" stamped on it. Probably what you have is a quarter that someone has put their initial on or marked it for some reason. With such a mark it has no numismatic value but is worth $2.52 for the silver it contains.


At the time of writing, a US 90% silver quarter (dated 1964 or earlier) is worth $5.55 for the silver content. A Canadian quarter dated 1920-1967 80% silver quarter is worth $4.63, a Canadian quarter dated 1967-1968 that is 50% silver is worth $2.89.


This is a rare misstruck error and is worth up to $90.00 according to condition.


A 1947 Quarter is worth $200.00!


If it's an American quarter, it contains no silver and is worth 25 cents (the last year for U.S. silver quarters was 1964). If it's a Canadian quarter, then it DOES contain silver and is currently worth about $3.


A 1970 US quarter has no silver, so it has no silver value.


Do you mean a quarter DOLLAR? Quarter eagles were not issued in 1968. And could you describe "double 'stamped"" ? (note the term is actually "struck" in coin jargon).


As of Sept. 7, 2011 silver is $41.55 an Ounce. A quarter is worth $7.5142 or 7.51


Copper-nickel, not silver, just like all the other quarters out there in change. Unless it's uncirculated, it's only worth a quarter. A P mint mark, not a "P Mint" - that would be the entire Philadelphia Mint building! The only silver state quarters were issued by the San Francisco mint ("S") and were sold in special "prestige" coin sets. All coins from Philadelphia were made out of copper-nickel.


Assuming it's an American quarter, it's worth $3 for the silver in February 2018.


No "quarter silver dollars" have been made by the U.S. Mint. Please post new question. Is it a quarter or a silver dollar?


Going purely by melt value, a U.S. quarter minted before 1965 is currently worth about $5.50 for the silver (as of 11 January 2013).



A 1953 quarter contains some silver. If it is circulated it is worth $3.66. If it is uncirculated it is worth $4.13 to $4.30.


A silver bracelet stamped with 925 is typically sterling silver. Sterling silver has a current market value of US $17.19 per ounce.


1966 Canadian quarter is 80% silver and approximately has .1501 Troy oz of silver. So it depends what silver spot is. With silver at $48/oz it's worth $7.20


30 cents; 25 for the quarter part, 5 for the nickel part.


It's a novelty item worth couple of cents for the gold plating plus whatever the underlying quarter is worth. If the quarter is copper-nickel, then it's only worth a quarter. If it's a special silver "prestige" quarter made in San Francisco it's at least worth maybe $3.50 for its metal content.


At present, one is worth around $4.


One is currently worth about $3.50 for the silver.



This quarter is not made of any silver so a 1970 quarter is only worth 25 centsIt's a common coin, still in circulation, has no silver and is just face value.


You don't have a pure silver quarter as the US has never minted a pure silver (99.9% pure or higher) silver quarter. Instead what you have is a 90% silver quarter which would be dated 1964 or prior. The value depends on a number of factors including the date, the mintmark and the condition. But a silver quarter is worth $5-6 in scrap silver regardless of type or condition, however some quarters can be worth significantly more.



It's a common date Washington quarter, most are only valued for the silver, about $5.00 as of today.



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