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2014-08-28 00:35:13
2014-08-28 00:35:13

There are too many variables to be able to give you an estimate. It depends on the car, your record, and how much insurance. For an accurate price contact an insurance company.

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Usually the Insurance underwriters would offer the licensed driver what is called a Named driver exclusion. This should not affect the cost of your insurance premium. The u/w would need to know information about the unlicensed operator (why don't they have a license? was it suspended, revoked, or are they just not licensed because of a handicap, or the person just does not drive) Once this is determined then he u/w would better know how to proceed in offering the NDE.


"This will depend on your state and the laws that are in effect. You would be able to contact any State Farm agent for the details, but you must be a licensed driver to carry auto insurance."


Yes, they can take you to court over the damage that you caused. Your insurance company would be obligated to defend you assuming that you are cooperating with their defense efforts.


The best thing to do would be to consult an attorney and file a countersuit against the unlicensed driver. You should also contact your insurance company, as you may have given them power of attorney for you in terms of automobile accidents when you signed your insurance contract, in which case your insurance company must sue for you.


Their own insurance would cover it if they had collision insurance.


the insurance of the owners car would have to be liable. basically, your not gonna get sh*t cus driving with no license or insurance automatically makes you at fault--regardless of who really in all actuality was. DONT DRIVE WITH NO INSURANCE.


It is possible that the insurance rate would go up if a permitted driver has an accident. Usually, raising insurance rates is not an individual decision.


If you are a listed driver on an insurance policy then your characteristics will be considered in the rating of the insurance policy. Under some circumstances a listed driver will have very little if any impact on the premium. In other cases a listed driver will impact the premium significantly. Many insurance companies require that all licensed drivers in a household be listed and proper premiums be paid or excluded, in writing, from coverage. If you decide to exclude a licensed operator then there would be no coverage for that person on the insurance policy. I personally know of a situation in which an excluded person was allowed to drive the car to church on Sunday. There was an accident and all coverage was denied by the insurance company.


liability insurance goes with the driver, so the drivers insurance would pay for it. If the driver does not have insurance, then the owner of the car's insurance would pay if the vehicle was knowingly lent.


Sorry but you can't. Since you have to have a licensed driver in the passenger seat when you drive, you are under that person's insurance (most likely your parents). I have never heard of an auto insurance company giving insurance to a non-licensed driver (but I'm sure they would make some more money that way!). WHEN you get your license and can show proof of you driver's license ID number (or it's on record) THEN they will give you auto insurance. You're parents can actually put you on as an "occasional driver" on their insurance. Granted, if you are under 25 and male (or just under 25), they'll be forking over some serious cash to have you on their insurance. If you wreck, their insurance will go through the roof, or worse, they'll be dropped.


You would have to be added to your parents policy as a driver, and you will be subject to premium increases if you are a younger driver because insurance trends show younger drivers to be a higher risk than others. Sean IL Licensed Ins Producer


Not necessarily. But all household members must be disclosed to the insurance company, and from there they either must be included or excluded. I would recommend everyone go on the same policy, that way you take advantage of multi-car, multi driver discounts.


You will need to be trained and licensed to sale insurance. You can get training with the insurance company you would like to represent.


they should as long as the permit holder had a licensed driver with him. now, it would help if that person was on the policy.


I would get an insurance quote from Allstate. I heard they give driver discounts for students with good grades.


It basically just depend son your insurance policy. If you have standard policy and the driver was not excluded then you likely have coverage, if you purchased a more economical but limited policy, (AKA Named Driver policy) then it may not be covered. Best advise is to simply contact your insurer to ask if the non-licensed driver will be covered or not.


The answer is NO. Yous can work in the office as an office assistant, but you cannot sell insurance. No company would appoint you if you are not licensed.


Laws on this vary by state. In some states, the answer would be yes; in others, it would be no.


The owner's insurance covers the car and usually whomever is driving it. Many people drive cars that belong to someone else. If you are a licensed driver, you'll be covered.


No. If you had broadform insurance he would be able to drive any vehical you own as long as you NAME him a driver. Broadform is nice for people with more then one vehical.


yes. you can sue an at fault driver if his insurance company refuses to pay your claim. it would not be proper to sue the insurance company.


Look for a licensed title insurance agent with an office in the state you are transacting business in. You can contact your state insurance administration for information or a list of licensed agents in your state or look on line for a licensed title insurance agent in your local area. I would recommend confirming they are licensed and bonded. You can also check other qualifications by looking for a title company affiliated with local chambers of commerce and or professional associations like ALTA.


One would find good car insurance if one was a new driver at insurance companies that are known to be reputable. Companies that offer car insurance for new drivers are: State Farm, Allstate, and Nationwide.



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