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If a person cosigns on a vehicle loan and is listed as the primary buyer on the title and the person they cosigned for has refused to make any payments can the the cosigner regain ownership of the car?

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2005-09-19 02:30:08
2005-09-19 02:30:08

If a person's name is listed on a title, that person owns the car. If a person merely cosigned the note, that person's name will not be on the title. If you own the car, you certainly can take physical possession of it.

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A cosigner is a person who signs with another person for a loan of some sort due to credit issues or financial reasons. A cosigner unfortunately does not have as many rights as the person who is first listed on a loan. For example, if you purchase a car and your boyfriend/girlfriend cosigns for you and you two break up, they cannot take the car away from you. However, if you are late on payments, the cosigner will then be responsible for the payments.

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The cosigner is responsible for the loan and payments if the signer does not pay or keep up the payments. Your credit rating can be affected.

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Then the cosigner is responsible for paying. most plases uses caladeral like a car or house, if the bond is not paid the car or house is taken

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my mother cosigned for a leased car for my sister. my mom has died. what do we do with the car? will my sister now be responsilbe?

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Yes. If the original borrower defaults, and the cosigner is unable to take over the debt.

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Yes, your parents can cosign for a loan and if you are smart keep up the payments on that loan as it will give you a good and early credit record. If you don't keep up the payments it's a lousy thing to do to your parents, and they will be stuck paying that loan. Marcy

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if you are paying on time there is no risk to the co signer

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I'm sure you won't like this answer, but only the lender can repossess the collateral. If the cosigner is also a co-owner and listed on the title, he could insist on taking his turn driving the car. But essentially, the only right a cosigner has is the "right" to make the payments if the primary borrower does not.

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I've seen enough 'Judge Judy' episodes to almost recite her exactly... Anyone who cosigns for something - is equally liable for any costs. Although they were not responsible for the actual accident - the other party can sue each cosigner for the cost of repairing the damages.The cosigner who was not driving - would then have to sue the driver to recover their money.

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None, unless the cosigner is also on the title of the vehicle they have no legal rights to the property. When someone cosigns a loan for any reason they accept the responsibility of paying the debt if the primary borrower defaults. The only option a cosigner has in recovering money paid out in connection with the loan is to sue the primary borrower in the appropriate court, in the city or county where the borrower lives.

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From what I understand any credit activities on a minor's name is illegal. You must be 18 to establish credit.

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No, you don't get any rights over the car. Co-signing just agrees that you have an obligation to pay all or part of the debt in case the other person does not. You can't really 'get out' if it unless you complete the obligation.

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It will be reported to the credit bureaus under both names, but will have a greater effect on the primary borrower's report. If payments are made on time, it will never indicate which party actually made the payment.

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If you are under age and she is making the payments, yes. Look its probably wiser she takes your dads place in this arrangement.

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You can as long as the title says:(example) John Doe or Jane Doe, if it says John Doe and Jane Doe then the cobuyer has to be a part of the sale.

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yes, and if you and your cosigner get into a disagreement. you would have to take them to court to get them off the mortgage if they dont agree. and they could sue you for half of what your mortgage is worth. and if they win you pay them what they won and then they can be taken off. but yes they own half.

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None. When a person cosigns any financial agreement they are entering into a legally binding contract to repay the debt if the primary borrower defaults on the loan. Although it would seem the cosigner should be allowed to be relieved of the debt responsiblity due to the actions of the primary borrower, it is unlikely a judge would take the same view. The cosigner does have legal option to recover money spent to cover the primary borrower's financial obligation. In a case such as cited it would be very difficult to file a lawsuit against the person in question. The person in possession of the vehicle however may be in violation of criminal statutes for removing the vehicle from the state if he or she did not receive prior approval from the lender.

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*The point is they are married and although it won't affect her credit rating if her husband is stuck with this loan it will reflect on both of them as far as possibly putting them into debt. If your spouse just cosigned then yes, they are responsible for that debt if their child decides not to pay. If the child does pay the payments then there should be no problem. Cosigning is never a good idea even if it is family because the cosigner is 100% responsible for that debt. * The non signing spouse would not be responsible for the debt nor would it affect his or her credit rating with perhaps the exception of applying for joint credit. Even if the married couple live in a community property state under such circumstances a spouse would not be responsible for the other's financial obligation that involved children of a previous marriage.

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The lender is the owner of the loan.The person who cosigns a loan is equally responsible for paying it if the primary borrower does not pay.See related question link.The lender is the owner of the loan.The person who cosigns a loan is equally responsible for paying it if the primary borrower does not pay.See related question link.The lender is the owner of the loan.The person who cosigns a loan is equally responsible for paying it if the primary borrower does not pay.See related question link.The lender is the owner of the loan.The person who cosigns a loan is equally responsible for paying it if the primary borrower does not pay.See related question link.

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Dont be silly you ninny this isn't an item from walmart your the cosigner and if you take it back to the dealer which you could do it will be considered a voluntary repossession and will go on your credit as well as your child's for the next 7 years do the smart thing and sell it or take over the payments.AnswerSo I'm guessing that's one way to say YES if you are on the loan you can return the vehicle to the bank. It will be marked as a voluntary and you run a great risk of still owing a lump sum after the vehicle is sold at auction so returning it does not constitute end of financial liability. AnswerCorrect. Returning the car to the dealer DOES NOT end financial responsibility or eliminate credit score DROPS.

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It depends on what country you are in. In America, you can do so in every state except Maine.

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Yes, so be careful. You have to be sure that you will stay with your spouse.

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To my knowledge, yes his name will be on the title and he would have equal rights to the vehicle.

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A co-signer is always responsible for the debt to the same level the borrower is. If Joe Blow reaffirms and continues payments, John Doe will not have to worry about anything. If Joe Blow does not continue payments, or does not reaffirm, John Doe is responsible. Speak with an attorney about your specific situation. If you can not find an attorney, contact your local Bar association and they will refer you to one.


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