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Answered 2009-09-14 20:27:40

No. You were not ordered to give of your custody rights, just primary residency was transferred to the father. You still have your parental rights, the same as a father, and responsibility to pay child support, whether the father wants it or not.

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She can consent to a court ordered guardianship if she has sole custody and the father has no parental rights. If the father has any parental rights he must also consent.She can consent to a court ordered guardianship if she has sole custody and the father has no parental rights. If the father has any parental rights he must also consent.She can consent to a court ordered guardianship if she has sole custody and the father has no parental rights. If the father has any parental rights he must also consent.She can consent to a court ordered guardianship if she has sole custody and the father has no parental rights. If the father has any parental rights he must also consent.


Without a Will, he has no clearly defined custodial rights to a stepchild, but unless addressed in a custody decree, neither does the father. Guardianship reverts to the maternal grandparents.



The rights of the natural father depends on if the father has given up his rights or not. If he has not given up his rights, he has the same rights as the mother, or as outlines in the custody order.



You don't say which of the parents that are incarcerated but their rights to the child comes first. If the father is not in the birth certificate and he has not established paternity to the court so he can petition for visitation or custody and also pay child support, there is nothing that legally says he is the father. Then the maternal grandmother would have a better chance. If the father is not in the birth certificate but he has established paternity to the court so he can petition for visitation or custody and also pay child support, the chance should be equal.


You have full and primary rights to your children. Grandparents do not have custody rights to children over parents.


No, only parents or grandparents are mentioned in the custody rights laws of the different states and not always grandparents either. It's up to the court when you apply for custody.


No, only parents or grandparents are mentioned in the custody rights laws of the different states and not always grandparents either. It's up to the court when you apply for custody.


Not if there is a mother in the picture who has custody rights. If the father has sole custody he can voluntarily consent to the appointment of his grandparents as guardians but it will need to go through the court. You should consult with an attorney.Not if there is a mother in the picture who has custody rights. If the father has sole custody he can voluntarily consent to the appointment of his grandparents as guardians but it will need to go through the court. You should consult with an attorney.Not if there is a mother in the picture who has custody rights. If the father has sole custody he can voluntarily consent to the appointment of his grandparents as guardians but it will need to go through the court. You should consult with an attorney.Not if there is a mother in the picture who has custody rights. If the father has sole custody he can voluntarily consent to the appointment of his grandparents as guardians but it will need to go through the court. You should consult with an attorney.


No, the mother is no more entitled to custody than the father. If the father currently has temporary or implied custody, then a custody order must first be established before you can get partial custody or visitation rights. For example, if you moved out and left the child in the care of the father, you forfeited your custody rights until an official custody order has been established.


* If the father has full custody of the children, yes. * If he has partial or shared custody with the mother, it may be a violation of parental rights; that area is quite dicey, so talk to a lawyer. * If the father has no custody but does have visiting rights, then again, talk to your lawyer. * If the father has no rights to the children, then there is no crime committed.


If you are not married the custody automatically falls on the mother and the father have to go to court to get visitation or custody. If you are married you have equal rights.


Even with a custody award, if the child is in state care, his chances are 15% in getting the child. see links below


Yes as the father has become a defaulter then the mother can get full custody and have the parental rights of the father revoked.



Generally, if married he has custody rights equal to the mother unless she has brought a petition for sole custody in his absence. If he is not married his custody rights must be established by a court order.


If the parents are married they have equal rights. If not married, the mother in general have sole custody in most states until the father have established his paternity. When he has done that by DNA test he can petition for custody and visitation in court.


She has full custody from birth. The father have to prove paternity in court to gain his parental rights and get custody, visitation and pay child support.


Whoever the court says. It's possible they could wind up sharing custody.


As long as the father is a good father, he will have the same rights as the mother. You may be even able to get 50% custody of the child.


As many rights as the mother wishes to allow until the father protects himself with court ordered visitation and decision making rights. In some states, the father may have certain intrinsic rights, but you would need to provide where you reside and the state (or country if outside the USA) where the child legally resides.


AnswerNo. Only a court can grant custody rights or guardianship rights. The inmate cannot assign his parental rights to his own mother.


How does he have any visitation rights with a custody and child support order?


No. The biological father have rights. Unless the court find him unfit to have custody then there might be a chance.