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If your husband has end stage liver disease and he receives Social Security payments can you get paid for taking care of your husband?

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Wiki User
2009-04-24 09:45:37
2009-04-24 09:45:37

No, it is assumed that one spouse will care for the other during illness or troubled times. That is the basis of the "sickness or in health..for richer or poorer" that is included in the traditional wedding vows. Even if one did actually take such vows, the presumption is still morally and legally valid. YES YOU CAN MY MOM TAKES CARE OF MY DAD AND GETS PAID FOR IT BUT ITS NOT THAT MUCH, AND I DONT THINK THATS RIGHT AND I THINK MY MOM IS WRONG FOR DOING THAT CUZ IF YOU REALLY LUV SOMEONE THE MONEY SHOULDNT MATTER!

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