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Insured motorist hit uninsured unlicensed driver - who's responsible?

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2008-04-12 00:02:15
2008-04-12 00:02:15

both, you for hitting the other vehicle and the other driver for being unlicensed

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regardless of whom is insured or not, the 'negligent' or liable party is responsible for the damage or 'to make whole' the injured (this means damage to vehicle as well) party........ i think the insured should pay since it was there fault


If the driver with the suspended license caused the accident then he/she is responsible.


Yes, this is because as you stated, the insured driver was at fault. The at fault driver is responsible regardless of the insured status of the person they hit. A good rule of thunb is this,, If they had insurance would I be responsible If the answer is Yes, then the answer is still Yes


When you buy a car, you have 30 days to get it insured before it becomes illegal, but you are completely financially responsible for any damage done until you are insured.


The insured drivers uninsured motorist coverage should take care of it. Doesn't matter if property is private or not.



No according to the law (which may be different from state to state) The uninsured motorist is always at fault


If the accident was caused by the uninsured driver than the uninsured driver is definitely still responsible.


Usually an uninsured motorist accident is not chargeable against insured in any way. Your rates should not be effected at all with most insurance companies.


"Stacked" refers to uninsured motorist coverage, not to liability or physical damage coverage. In essence, if there are two cars in a household, both with insured motorist coverage, the uninsured motorist limits of the cars can be "stacked"--added together. Naturally, this will only make a difference if the severity of the injury and the clarity of the liability is such as to warrant that size of a payment to the insured. Keep in mind that the assessment of damages by an insurer in an uninsured motorist claim is similar to that done by a liability insurer in a third-party claim. Note also that some states have "anti-stacking" statutes which prohibit the stacking of ininsured motorist limits.


Yes, they can. When you enrolled in the health plan and when you submitted the claim, you agreed to allow them to recoup money from any responsible party. It does not matter whether the responsible party was insured or uninsured; if they paid, the health plan has the right to recoup the money it paid for your care.


Should be turned into the company that is handling the uninsured motorist claim, (generally company that insured the 'insured' vehicle), they will most typcially wait to pay these bills until settlement is reached. If that didn't answer you question please expand it.


In most states you can purchase under-insured motorist or uninsured motorist coverage that will kick in when the other parties insurance is depleted.


The majority of the time no because it is an insured's policyholder's duty not to let unlicensed people driver their car because they cannot legally drive.



Yes they should. Did you carry uninsured motorist? The only issue is if your car had a driver that did not have a license or was living in your home and you did not tell them about this person.


If the accident was your fault and someone else was involved their uninsured motorist insurance will pay for their damage. The bad news is that they WILL sue for the amount they had to pay out.



The injury would most likely not be covered under your auto because you let an unlicensed driver drive your vehicle when they cannot legally drive.


Assuming the stolen car was insured, the stolen cars insurance would be responsible. If the stolen car was not insured, the driver, if located would be responsible. If not located then the owner would probably be held responsible. Hopefully the struck vehicle is insured for "uninsured motorist" coverage. Filing the report after the accident would document the theft, but not neccesarily clear the owner of responsibility.


If you are insured for 'full coverage' or possibly 'uninsured motorist', yes. In a standard liability policy you would probably not be covered.


Uninsured motoristUninsured Motorist coverage (which is required coverage in many states) covers injuries that the driver and occupants of a car sustain when the at-fault vehicle was not insured for liability coverage. UM does not cover the physical damage to the vehicle. UMPD (uninsured motorist property damage), where available, covers that physical damage. UMPD is essentially similar to collision coverage, which is first party insurance that pays regardless of fault, subject to a deductible.Uninsured motorist coverage pays essentially the same type of benefits (such as for pain and suffering) as the liability insurance of the other party would pay if the at-fault party had liability insurance. Additionally, the uninsured motorist insurer will generally evaluate a claimant's injuries in much the same way as a liability insurer would, and the claimant is subject to a reduction in damages for contributory or comparative negligence according to the law of the jurisdiction.


generally, it would be from your "uninsured/under-insured motorist" coverage. You wind up suing your own insurance company to collect. If the uninsured motorist coverage on your personal auto policy is not enough, you may also be able to tap the uninsured motorist coverage under your umbrella policy (if you have one). Now, if you live in a "no-fault" state you can tap the "personal injury protection" or something similar (different states call if different things). If you are in this situation, I'd highly suggest you consult an experienced lawyer.AnswerYou would have to sue the responsible party in the accident for pain and suffering. If they are insured for liability and you can prove pain and suffering in court, then their insurance company would pay a court judgement up to the policy limits.If they are not insured for it then you would first have to pay your own lawyer expenses and you could get a judgement against the responsible driver with which you could then seek wage garnishments and property liens to recoup your loss.


If you get into an accident in New Jersey and are not insured, it will cost you a substantial amount. The cost to repair the vehicle, pay the fines if responsible for the accident and possibly have to pay for some damages done to other vehicles or public property.




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