Is a sword a hangar?

No, a hangar sword is a specific reference to decorative basket-hilted swords.

Although modern decorative swords are the most prolific "hangar swords", being usually made of very brittle stainless steel and not even having good tangs*, there are examples of hangar swords that date earlier on, possibly as early as the late 1600s. Historically, if a general wanted or needed a very decorative sword as a symbol of power, but did not need it to be especially useful for battle, they would go for a hangar sword.

Swords most typically called hangar swords are basket-hilted swords that belonged to people of wealth and status. Bear in mind that many generals, admirals and wealthy citizens did not expect to engage in close combat, with the exception of duels, which would be fought with different sets of swords. It was entirely possible for the same person to wear one decorative sword on the street and have one fencing sword stored for duelling purposes.

* The "tang" is the part of a sword that goes into the hilt, an extremely important feature in determining a sword's durability
No, a hangar sword is a specific reference to decorative basket-hilted swords.

Although modern decorative swords are the most prolific "hangar swords", being usually made of very brittle stainless steel and not even having good tangs*, there are examples of hangar swords that date earlier on, possibly as early as the late 1600s. Historically, if a general wanted or needed a very decorative sword as a symbol of power, but did not need it to be especially useful for battle, they would go for a hangar sword.

Swords most typically called hangar swords are basket-hilted swords that belonged to people of wealth and status. Bear in mind that many generals, admirals and wealthy citizens did not expect to engage in close combat, with the exception of duels, which would be fought with different sets of swords. It was entirely possible for the same person to wear one decorative sword on the street and have one fencing sword stored for duelling purposes.

* The "tang" is the part of a sword that goes into the hilt, an extremely important feature in determining a sword's durability